05.09.2022
11:00–12:00

Far East Street, House of Indigenous Peoples

Creative Business Forum. Sociocultural Development of Northern Regions

Effective networking. Collaboration is everything!

Moderator:
Veronika Sipacheva — President, Energy of Participation Fund; Coordination, Association of Youth Governments of the Russian Federation in the Far Eastern Federal District

05.09.2022
13:00–14:00

Far East Street, House of Indigenous Peoples

Creative Business Forum. Sociocultural Development of Northern Regions

Social Agenda of the Regions: New Global Crossroads


The Russian Arctic and the Far East, which for many years have been viewed as sites of resource projects, are becoming two separate macro-centres of social and economic force in the new geopolitical realities. Russian business’s growing interest in the northern regions is not only due to the expansion of Russia’s range of influence in the Arctic, but also the emerging system of preferences for residents of the Russian Arctic. The emergence of knowledge-intensive service companies, the pivoting of investment projects to the Asia-Pacific and BRICS and the alternative logistics flows that have resulted from this, increased tourism, and new infrastructure have all combined to create a solid foundation for international cooperation. Such issues as community development, the strengthening of horizontal social ties, the development of human capital, and the preservation of a unique ecosystem in the urbanized territories of the Arctic and the Far East should remain a key element of Russia’s social and technological progress.
● How have the partnership projects of NPOs and companies changed in the new economic environment? What principles and rules for working with local communities are corporations following in the absence of international standards and requirements?
● Which social and environmental projects of funds and companies have responded to the challenges of the last three years?
● Research and reports: what do we know about philanthropy and social investment in the Arctic, BRICS, and the Asia-Pacific? What data are we lacking? Is special infrastructure needed for the third sector to cooperate with foreign partners?
● What is holding back the development of international projects in the Arctic and the Far East? How can the government and development institutions support funds and companies?
● Pivot to the North and East: what international projects in philanthropy and social investment can we expect to see in 2022–2023?


Moderator:
Aleksandra Boldyreva — Executive Director, Russian Donors Forum

Speakers:
Vladimir Vasilev — Executive Director, The Secretariat of the Northern Forum
Roman Genkel — Deputy Governor of Yugra, Director of the Economic Development Department of Yugra
Natalya Gonchar — Head of Corporate Relations Department, Sakhalin Energy
Antonina Gorbunova — Member of the UN Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
Lyudmila Danilova — Executive Director, Kupol Social Development Fund
Aisen Nikolaev — Head of Sakha Republic (Yakutia)
Alexander Stotskiy — General Director, Expert Center - Project Office for the Development of the Arctic

Front row participant:
Анатолий Зубарев — начальник управления по корпоративным коммуникациям ПАО "ДВМП" | FESCO

05.09.2022
15:00–16:00

Far East Street, House of Indigenous Peoples

Revival of the Pacific Floating University: The Foundation for Training Scientific Personnel for the Arctic and the Far East


The session is dedicated to the development of the floating universities movement, the revival of the Pacific Floating University, and the promotion of the experience of the Arctic Floating University of Northern (Arctic) Federal University and the floating universities of Moscow State University and the Institute of Oceanology of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

Floating universities are a Russian educational technology that is consistent with the Learning through Research formula. It is most effective for training personnel in marine sciences for environmental organizations and manufacturers involved in the exploration and production of minerals, as well as for scientific and educational institutions with expertise in studying the seas and oceans. It involves teaching both students and graduate students the theoretical foundations of marine sciences, ensuring they directly master the practical aspects of such sciences, and also radically improving the skills of young researchers as well as scientific and pedagogical workers by solving applied problems as they take part in scientific expeditions.

Key discussion topics
● The experience of the Arctic floating university as a form of networking between universities, scientific organizations, and industrial companies. The success of Northern (Arctic) Federal University’s project through interagency cooperation. The experience of organizing floating universities of Moscow State University and the Institute of Oceanology of the Russian Academy of Sciences in cooperation with Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology.
● The revival of the Pacific Floating University as a key project to train research personnel for the development of the Far East and the Arctic. The goals, prospects, and ways to build collaboration with the country’s universities and scientific organizations along with the cooperation and leading role of Far Eastern Federal University. In 2022, FEFU is serving as one of the five sites for the All-Russian Scientific School of Floating Universities for the first time, bringing together representatives of regional scientific organizations and students who are interested in specialized professions.
● Prospects for the creation of floating universities in other regions of the Russian Arctic, including floating universities on rivers. The development of general principles for the functioning of floating universities. Interagency collaboration as the foundation for the development of floating universities.


Moderator:
Alexander Milkus — Director, Learning through Research autonomous non-profit organization; Columnist, Komsomolskaya Pravda Publishing House; Director, Laboratory of Media Communications in Education, National Research University Higher School of Economics

Speakers:
Yury Vasilenko — Senior Researcher, Paleooceanology Laboratory, Pacific Oceanological Institute, Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (online)
Kirill Vinnikov — Director, Institute of the World Ocean (School), Far Eastern Federal University
Konstantin Zaykov — Vice Rector for International Cooperation, Northern (Arctic) Federal University; Candidate of Historical Sciences (online)
Olesya Rutenko — Organizer, Pacific Floating University Project
Pavel Salyuk — Director, Laboratory of Satellite Oceanology and Laser Sounding, Pacific Oceanological Institute, Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences
Natalia Stepanova — Deputy Director, Ocean Thermohydromechanics Department, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology; Director, Floating University Scientific and Educational Programme of the Institute of Oceanology of the Russian Academy of Sciences
Alexey Titov — Vice Rector for Digitalization, Innovations, and Priority Projects, Astrakhan State University namе of V.N. Tatishcheva
Nikolay Shabalin — Executive Director, Marine Research Centre, Moscow State University; Special Representative for Marine Activity, Arctic Council

05.09.2022
17:00–18:30

Far East Street, House of Indigenous Peoples

Creative Business Forum. Sociocultural Development of Northern Regions

North–South: Using Ethnocultural Heritage as a Resource for Sustainable Development


The International Year of Creative Economy for Sustainable Development 2021 not only shifted the focus to the development of the creative industries and the knowledge economy, but also began to change the paradigm in the development of cultural heritage and Indigenous languages. With globalization processes already encompassing the entire planet and reaching its most remote corners, not only has interest in the convergence and mutual influence of different cultures not diminished, it has become more pronounced. Seeing how technologies, genres, formats, and forms are becoming more unified, people have started getting a greater appreciation for cultural differences and celebrating what distinguishes the art and culture of a particular city or region. The government and corporations view investment in cultural diversity as an investment in the sustainability of local communities and businesses. Such a paradigm does not insulate Indigenous Peoples from the sustainable natural environment that shapes their worldview, creativity, and innovation, which is the basis for the economic development of Indigenous communities.
• Incorporating the traditions, knowledge, and innovations of Indigenous Peoples into the global economy will benefit all parties, provided that such inclusion takes place on the terms of the Indigenous Peoples themselves and respects their rights. This thematic discussion will address the universal and distinctive features of the knowledge economy of the world’s Indigenous Peoples: from the Arctic Taimyr to South Africa. What is the best way to develop cultural interaction between the North and the South?
• How should the traditional economy and the economy based on the traditions of Indigenous Peoples be integrated into international economic relations so that their cultural and historical heritage is protected?
• How can Indigenous Peoples and businesses build relationships to properly convey and not distort culture and traditions?
• How can the ethno-cultural and historical codes of Indigenous Peoples be linked to the ability to apply these codes in the modern world?
• What can be done locally, nationally, and internationally to support the knowledge economy of Indigenous Peoples?


Moderator:
Aleksei Tsykarev — Vice Chair of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, Northern Crafts ID Project Coordinator at Association ECHO

Speakers:
Andrey Grachev — Vice President for Federal and Regional Programs, Norilsk Nickel
Vera Kondratyeva — Head of the public organization of culture of the Indigenous Peoples of the North "Ma Mykham"
Nikolay Korchunov — Ambassador-at-Large of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation; Chair of the Senior Arctic Officials, Arctic Council (online)
Aleksandra Lebedeva — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Kamchatka Territory
Grigory Ledkov — Senator of the Federation Council of the Russian Federation, President of the Russian Association of Indigenous Peoples of the North
Mikhail Pogodaev — Deputy Minister for Arctic Development and Northern Affairs of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia); Special Representative of the Russian Chairmanship in the Arctic Council on Indigenous Peoples Issues and Regional Cooperation (online)
Aleksei Sokolov — Head of "Osikat" (online)
Phoolman Chaudhary — Member of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous People

06.09.2022
11:00–12:00

Far East Street, House of Indigenous Peoples

Creative Business Forum. Sociocultural Development of Northern Regions

Snowy Homes: Pecualirities of Developing the Environment of Northern Cities


Russia’s Arctic territories cover an area of roughly 4.8 million km² (28% of the country’s territory). The region is home to 11% of the nation’s income and more than 20% of its exports. In addition, the Russian Arctic is the most urbanized region of the country, with more than 90% of local residents living in cities. Despite this, no more than 2.6 million people (less than 2% of Russia’s population) live in Arctic cities, and the population numbers have drastically declined in recent decades. Such a trend could eventually lead to a recession in the economy of the macro-region and the country as a whole, and, most importantly, the deterioration of the living conditions of people living there who do not plan to leave. To stop this trend, people not only need to have their basic needs met for heat and water as well as the availability of kindergartens and schools, but also need a comfortable urban environment, a service sector, and a creative cluster of the economy, including all types of arts as well as an IT and tourism sector.
● How can we incorporate the design code of the Arctic territories, which aims to polish the environment in the settlements of these zones, when working with the urban fabric?
● What other comprehensive tools exist for creating a comfortable environment given the harsh climatic conditions? What design solutions can be used for architecture and landscaping?
● How can we preserve the region’s identity despite the similarity of all the challenges and the design solutions that are taken in response? Most importantly, how much will all these transformations cost given the inaccessibility of building resources?


Moderator:
Evgeniya Murinets — Director, Urban Policy Institute

Speakers:
Maxim Dankin — Deputy Director for Regional Development, Information and Analytical Center of the State Commission for Arctic Development
Yulia Zubarik — Bureau founder «MASTER’S PLAN»
Svetlana Kravchuk — Co-founder, Arctic Design School
Ivan Kuryachiy — Managing Partner, New Land («Novaya Zemlya»)
Oleg Rakitov — Director-Coordinator of Social and Cultural Programs, VEB.RF

Front row participant:
Victoria Boginskaya — co-founder of PG Yarus

06.09.2022
13:00–14:00

Far East Street, House of Indigenous Peoples

Creative Business Forum. Sociocultural Development of Northern Regions

The Creative Potential of the North. What is Needed to Make the Arctic Regions Attractive for Living and Creativity?


Russia is a rich country with a well-developed industrial sector, vast natural resources, and an enormous territory. But its greatest value is the creative energy of its inhabitants. The concept of a ‘creative city’ infers that not only a metropolis, but also a remote region, small town, or rural settlement can become creative. Creating an environment for the education of professional specialists at the local level, as well as comfortable and attractive infrastructure for living, will help to put people’s innovative, entrepreneurial, and socio-cultural initiatives into action. The proper use of local residents’ creative energy creates an atmosphere that makes the city an attractive place to live and for tourism.
● What needs to be done to make the North and the Arctic appealing places for living and attract people? What role does the region’s image play in attracting and retaining human resources and how can it be improved?
● What kind of infrastructure is needed to keep young people in the northern regions? Why do cities need communities and how can creative industries help create them?
● What are the best practices for training and attracting professional skilled workers to the regions? What initial results have creative industries colleges shown?
● What benefits are there from involving third sector players, such as funds and responsible companies, in the integrated social development of territories?


Moderator:
Tatyana Abankina — Director, Center for Creative Economy, National Research University Higher School of Economics

Speakers:
Borislav Volodin — Director, National Open Championship of Creative Competencies Art Masters
Sargylana Ignatieva — Rector, Arctic State Institute of Culture and Arts
Alexey Komissarov — Director General, Russia – the Country of Opportunities
Nikita Marchenkov — Chairman of the Coordinating Council for Youth Affairs in the Scientific and Educational Spheres of the Presidential Council of the Russian Federation for Science and Education
Alexey Pinchuk — Deputy Director of the Department of Federal and Regional Programs, Norilsk Nickel
Vitaliy Ten — Founder, Mechtalet
Ekaterina Cherkes-zade — Head, Universal University

Front row participant:
Ioann Klindukhov — Head of the Federal Center, Federal Institute for the Development of Vocational Education and Training

06.09.2022
15:00–17:00

Far East Street, House of Indigenous Peoples

ESG Trends in the Context of Sustainable Development of Indigenous Peoples


The evolutionary development of human rights in the 21st century has brought ESG principles to the forefront in companies’ policies. This trend is notably supported and promoted by international and regional financial institutions. The principles of ESG – environmental, social, and governance – aim to contribute to the achievement of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals for mankind proclaimed by the UN.

Indigenous peoples, as subjects of law, are among the stakeholders of the sustainability policies of industrial and other companies, but, on the other hand, they serve as a benchmark for international and country-based rating agencies in determining companies’ compliance with ESG standards.

In 2020, Russia’s National Rating Agency developed and approved a methodology for assigning non-credit ratings that assess a company’s exposure to environmental and social business risks, as well as corporate governance risks (ESG ratings). One of the criteria is whether the company has a policy on interaction with local populations who lead a traditional way of life (e.g., the Indigenous peoples of the North) and the implementation of socially significant projects in this regard.

In 2021, the European rating agency RAEX-Europe ranked Lukoil as the ESG leader in the oil and gas sector and considered the factor of support for Indigenous peoples, among other criteria.

Major companies such as Norilsk Nickel, Sakhalin Energy, Irkutsk Oil Company, the Eastern Siberia-Pacific Ocean oil pipeline, and several more place special emphasis in their social policies on supporting Indigenous peoples.

The voluntary adoption of ESG standards by small and medium-sized businesses will help achieve the sustainable development goals of Indigenous peoples in a shorter time.

Key themes of the roundtable:
● ESG standards of international financial institutions
● Standards of the UN Global Compact;
● Russia’s experience of companies engaging in social responsibility based on the example of:
a) National Standard of the Russian Federation GOST R ISO 26000-2012 ‘Guidelines for Social Responsibility’
b) Standard of responsibility for residents of the Arctic Zone of the Russian Federation
● The role of the Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs and the Russian Chamber of Commerce and Industry in disseminating social responsibility practices in places where Indigenous peoples engage in traditional economic activities
● Social responsibility practices of Russian industrial companies in places where Indigenous peoples engage in traditional economic activities
● Dissemination of knowledge about ESG standards among Indigenous peoples
● Investment appeal of Russian industrial companies that provide social support to Indigenous peoples
● Involvement of public associations of Indigenous peoples in the procedures for assigning ESG ratings to companies


Moderator:
Grigorii Diukarev — Co-Chairman of the Working Group on Sustainable Development (SDWG) of the Arctic Council, Chairman of the Council of Representatives of Indigenous People of the Russian Federation Living in the Krasnoyarsk Territory, under the Government of the Krasnoyarsk Region

Speakers:
Soslan Abisalov — Director of the Department for the Development of the Arctic Zone of the Russian Federation and the implementation of infrastructure projects, Ministry of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Ildar Gilmutdinov — First Deputy Chairman of the Committee of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation on Issues of Nationalities
Natalya Gonchar — Head of Corporate Relations, Sakhalin Enerji
Andrey Grachev — Vice President for Federal and Regional Programs, Norilsk Nickel
Natalia Dorpeko — Executive Director, Global Compact National Network Association (online)
Nikolay Korchunov — Ambassador-at-Large of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation; Chair of the Senior Arctic Officials, Arctic Council (online)
Grigory Ledkov — Senator of the Federation Council of the Russian Federation, President of the Russian Association of Indigenous Peoples of the North
Sergei Timoshkov — Advisor to the Head, Russian Federal Agency for Ethnic Affairs
Yuliya Shabala — Deputy Director General for Sustainable Development and Corporate Affairs, Udokan Copper

Front row participants:
Vladimir Vasilev — Executive Director, The Secretariat of the Northern Forum
Valery Vengo — Deputy of the Legislative Assembly of the Krasnoyarsk Territory; Vice President, Russian Association of Indigenous Peoples of the North
Elena Golomareva — Chairman of the Standing Committee on Indigenous Minorities of the North and Arctic Affairs Issues, State Assembly Il Tumen of the Republic of Sakha Yakutia
Viktoria Darmaeva — President, Trans-Baikal Association of Indigenous Peoples of the North
Nikita Dobroslavskiy — Head of the Laboratory for Low Carbon and Circular Economy, Center for Sustainable Development, Moscow School of Management SKOLKOVO
Alexander Komissarov — Deputy Director, Department of Subsoil Use and Natural Resources of the Khanty-Mansi Autonomous District
Anna Otke — Senator of the Russian Federation Council; President, Association of Indigenous Peoples of Chukotka Regional Public Organization
Konstantin Robbek — Commissioner for the Rights of Indigenous Peoples of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)
Sergey Sizonenko — Deputy of the Legislative Assembly of the Krasnoyarsk Territory; Vice President of the Association for Legal Affairs
Tamara Usatova — President, Kolta-Kup (Ob People) Association of Indigenous Peoples of the North of the Tomsk Region
Yuriy Hatanzeisky — Deputy Governor of the Nenets Autonomous District for the Affairs of the Nenets and Other Indigenous Peoples of the North
Aleksei Tsykarev — Deputy Chairman, UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues

06.09.2022
17:30–20:00

Far East Street, House of Indigenous Peoples

Traditional Life Support Systems of Indigenous Peoples in Modern Economic Conditions. Practice, Prospects, Law


The traditional life support systems of Indigenous peoples continue to play a vital role in their socioeconomic development. The identity of ethnic groups, their special legal status, and the government’s objectives of creating conditions for their preservation and well-rounded development require a rethinking of legal, economic, and infrastructural approaches and the development of new approaches to adapt the traditional types of economic activities of Indigenous peoples to the modern economic realities.

In the last two decades, legislative activity at the regional and federal levels has largely focused on social protection, which is certainly necessary, but it is just as important to create legal conditions to unleash the potential of the traditional economy of Indigenous peoples by intensifying production processes and the output of craft products with high added value.
Holding an in-depth discussion of these issues with the participation of representatives of Indigenous peoples, the federal and regional authorities, the scientific and expert community, and socially responsible business will help generate proposals to improve federal and regional legislation, regulate economic conditions for the conservation and development of the traditional use of natural resources by Indigenous peoples, and ultimately implement the goals of the Development Strategy for the Arctic Zone of the Russian Federation and Ensuring National Security for the Period until 2035 and the Strategy for the State National Policy of the Russian Federation for the Period until 2025.

Key themes of the roundtable:
● Improving legislation:
a) on the recognition of communities of Indigenous peoples of the North, Siberia, and the Far East as agricultural producers and small and medium-sized businesses
b) on state subsidies for reindeer breeding in the tundra, taiga, and mountains, hunting, fishing, and hunting for sea animals
c) approval of professional standards in the traditional sectors of the economic activities of Indigenous peoples
d) amendments to the Federal Laws “On Hunting and the Conservation of Hunting Resources and Amendments to Certain Legislative Acts of the Russian Federation”, “On Fishing and the Conservation of Aquatic Biological Resources”, “On the General Principles of Organizing Communities of Indigenous Peoples of the North, Siberia, and Far East of the Russian Federation”, the Forest Code, and the Tax Code in terms of improving mechanisms for Indigenous peoples and their communities to exercise their rights in the traditional use of natural resources

● Discussion of the Concept for the Development of Reindeer Breeding
● Prospects for the creation and development of territories for the traditional use of natural resources by Indigenous peoples
● Technologies to improve the quality of products from the traditional use of natural resources
● Export-oriented products of traditional crafts
● Ensuring the food security of the population of the Arctic Zone of the Russian Federation with the involvement of local producers
● Regulation of the number of predators in places where Indigenous peoples engage in traditional economic activities
● Staffing of sectors of the economy in places where Indigenous peoples engage in traditional economic activities


Moderator:
Yulia Yukel — Member, Public Expert Council, State Duma Committee on Ethnic Affairs; Honorary Lawyer, Moscow Regional Bar Association; Expert, Russian Association of Indigenous Peoples of the North

Speakers:
Artur Gaiulskii — Vice President of the Russian Association of Indigenous Peoples of the North, President of the Regional Association of Indigenous small-numbered peoples of the North of the Krasnoyarsk Krai
Ildar Gilmutdinov — Member of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation, First Deputy Chairman of the Committee of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation on Issues of Nationalities
Grigory Ledkov — Senator of the Federation Council of the Russian Federation, President of the Russian Association of Indigenous Peoples of the North
Anna Otke — Senator of the Federation Council of the Russian Federation, President, Regional Public Organization "Association of Indigenous Peoples of Chukotka"
Mikhail Pogodaev — Deputy Minister for Arctic Development and Northern Affairs of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) (online)
Sergei Timoshkov — Advisor to the Head, Russian Federal Agency for Ethnic Affairs
Alexander Fedotov — Acting Director of the Department of State Policy and Regulation in the Field of Hunting of the Ministry of Natural Resources and Ecology of the Russian Federation (online)

Front row participants:
Valentin Andreytsev — Chairman, Union of Indigenous Peoples of the Primorsky Territory
Elena Golomareva — Chairman of the Standing Committee on Indigenous Minorities of the North and Arctic Affairs Issues, State Assembly Il Tumen of the Republic of Sakha Yakutia
Roza Dolgan — Commissioner for the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in the Kamchatka Territory
Alexey Limanzo — Authorized Representative of the Indigenous Peoples of the North in the Sakhalin Region Duma
Andrey Metelitsa — President, Association of Indigenous Peoples of the North of the Kamchatka Territory
Anton Narchuganov — Director, Agency for the Development of the Northern Territories and the Support of Indigenous Minorities of the Krasnoyarsk Territory
Semyon Palchin — Commissioner for the Rights of Indigenous Peoples of the North in the Krasnoyarsk Territory
Konstantin Robbek — Commissioner for the Rights of Indigenous Peoples of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)
Andrey Todyshev — President, Ene-Bayat Kemerovo Association of the Teleut Peoples
Svetlana Chebodayeva — Chairwoman, Shoria Regional Society of Indigenous Peoples of the North of the Republic of Khakassia
Nikita Shulbayev — President, Kemerovo Association of the Shor People

07.09.2022
10:00–11:00

Far East Street, House of Indigenous Peoples

Creative Business Forum. Sociocultural Development of Northern Regions

Gastronomy of the Arctic, Siberia, and the Far East: How to Surprise a Picky Guest?


Today, gastronomy offers us a universal key to understanding the place, traditions, history, cultural heritage, and modern identity of different Russian territories and creating a new economy of a region: the experience economy. A region’s gastronomic image comes from the richness of its traditions and biodiversity. The distinctive brand of a region’s gastronomic identity, such as well-known regional foods, regional cuisine based on them, talented chefs, and impeccable service, contribute to a region’s tourist appeal. But can gastronomic tourism actually become a driver of a region’s economy?
● How can we develop and promote a territory’s gastronomic identity?
● How many regional products/dishes are needed to for a territory to achieve its own gastronomic identity and how should they be promoted?
● What role do food producers, restaurateurs, chefs, investors, and the authorities play in creating the gastronomic image of the region?
● Should a region form, develop, and promote a gastronomic image and then develop gastronomic tourism, or should it be the other way around?


Moderator:
Igor Bukharov — President, Federation of Restaurateurs & Hoteliers of Russia

Speakers:
Vladimir Bakanov — Director of the Institute for the Development of the National System of Regional Products and Protected Geographical Indications; President of the International Executive Committee for the Development and Promotion, Black Sea Cuisine
Vladimir Burkovskyi — Auther, Puppen Haus Gastronomic Theather; owner, Vladimir and Anzhelika Burkovsky Restaurants Group; co-owner, Siberian Bliny
Tatyana Tymyrova — Chairperson, Association of Hospitality of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)
Ekaterina Shapovalova — Author-methodologist, Head, Gastronomic Map of Russia Project

Front row participant:
Yulia Yakel — First Vice-President of the all-Russian public organization "Slow Food in Russia", expert of the Association of Indigenous Peoples of the North, Siberia and the Far East.

07.09.2022
11:30–12:30

Far East Street, House of Indigenous Peoples

Creative Business Forum. Sociocultural Development of Northern Regions

The Film Industry and Animation in the North and East: New Markets and Technologies


Today, new technologies are not only changing the way content is produced and distributed; they are changing the main character – the actual viewer and his/her values, habits, needs, and lifestyle. Cinema and animation are changing, as content becomes more diverse, complex, and multidimensional. The economic model of the industry as a whole is also changing. The regions are developing their infrastructure and conditions to create a competitive product not only for Russian consumers, but also for export. The Asian region has long been considered one of the most promising destinations for the distribution of Russian films, television series, and animation. In recent years, not only China, but also Korea, India, and Malaysia have been actively buying Russian animation and film content.
● What will the industry look like in the near future and what kind of content will the modern consumer want? What digital technologies help to bring your own product to new markets?
● Why do the regions need production? How does regional cinema affect the promotion of a region and tourism? How can a Russian region become competitive in film production? What tools for support exist today?
● What are some of the specific characteristics of regional cinema and animation in the northern regions? What production successes can northern already boast about?
● How can a finished product be adapted for the Asian consumer? How can we create high-quality material jointly with Asian producers that would be interesting for both markets?


Moderator:
Roman Karmanov — Chief Executive Officer, Presidential Fund for Cultural Initiatives

Speakers:
Maxim Dreval — General Director, Russian "Znanie" Society
Elena Dyagileva — Deputy Governor of the Murmansk Region
Natalya Komarova — Governor of Khanty‑Mansi Autonomous Area–Yugra
Lyubov Malyarevskaya — Director General, Russian Mediagroup
Margarita Popova — Project Author, Head, Kyndykan Creative Association
Anatoly Semenov — Minister of Innovations, Digital Development and Communication Technologies of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)
Vitaliy Ten — Founder, Mechtalet
Petr Khiki — producer
Fedor Scherbakov — General Director, Lenfilm Film Studio

07.09.2022
12:45–13:00

Far East Street, House of Indigenous Peoples

Creative Business Forum. Sociocultural Development of Northern Regions

Agreement signing ceremony

Speakers:
Maxim Dreval — General Director, Russian "Znanie" Society
Natalya Komarova — Governor of Khanty‑Mansi Autonomous Area–Yugra

07.09.2022
13:00–14:00

Far East Street, House of Indigenous Peoples

Creative Business Forum. Sociocultural Development of Northern Regions

From the Museum to a Creative Cluster: How Public Spaces Shape a Creative Life


In 2019, the regions began setting up cultural and educational clusters, theatre and concert halls, as well as museum and exhibition complexes as part of the National Culture Project. Creative spaces help to enhance economic value, incubate innovation in products and services, experiment and develop new ways of working and thinking, and serve as representatives of the creative sector. Modern museums, libraries, and galleries also play a similar role. They are no longer solely a place for exhibiting and storing art objects, but are becoming creative spaces and zones that integrate an innovative approach, concentrate new forms of cultural production, and provide infrastructure for the exchange of ideas and information.
● How should spaces be designed to become sites of long-term development for a region? How should creative specialists be linked to the specific tasks faced by business? What role and opportunities can galleries, museums, creative communities, and clusters play in the creator–business–city link?
● What positive effects do flagship creative projects and creative communities offer for regional development?
● How should the interests of different audiences be taken into account when creating creative spaces?
● Can the existing cultural and social infrastructure become the cornerstone for the creative development of a region?


Moderator:
Dmitry Barsenkov — General Director, Creative Industrial Cluster Octava

Speakers:
Philip Ermak — Director of art residence Mayak
Sergei Zverkov — Chairman, Ugra Creative Class Association
Igor Namakonov — General Director, Federation of Creative Industries
Maria Privalova
Alisa Prudnikova — Program Director, GES-2
Afanasiy Savvin — General Director, Sakha Republic Development Corporation

08.09.2022
11:00–12:00

Far East Street, House of Indigenous Peoples

Creative Business Forum. Sociocultural Development of Northern Regions

Russian Arctic Style: From the Epos to the Product


Well-known regional brands are often indicators of a territory’s economic development. The imprint of unique images and values that are characteristic of each individual territory and expressed in the final products of creative entrepreneurship is becoming a reliable tool for shaping a local identity and enhancing a region’s appeal and recognition.
● What is ‘Arctic style’? Does national identity have to be used in a product in the new realities? How should we work with visual and symbolic codes and convert cultural codes into finished products?
● How do contemporary artists adapt and use cultural codes in their works?
● What projects could help expand the market for creative goods and services?
● What challenges do entrepreneurs in the Arctic face in their activities? What needs to be done to make the undervalued work of a northern artisan more popular and better paid?
● How should we resolve the problem of selling the products of folk craftspeople from the northern regions? How can we ensure that small and medium-sized enterprises that produce local products can the export market?


Moderator:
Ekaterina Cherkes-zade — Head, Universal University

Speakers:
Victoria Boginskaya — co-founder of PG Yarus
Nadezhda Dorgunova — Minister of Culture and National Policy, Government of the Amur Oblast
Ksenia Ilauski — Deputy Director, Ugra Crafts Center
Vladimir Miloslavskyi — Project leader "Made in the Arctic region", Deputy Head of Bulun Region
Vasiliy Ovchinnikov — Adviser to the Chief Executive Officer, Russian Information Technology Development Fund

08.09.2022
12:15–12:30

Far East Street, House of Indigenous Peoples

Presentation of the Interactive Atlas of Indigenous Peoples of the North, Siberia and the Far East: Languages and Cultures


Atlas of Indigenous Peoples of the North, Siberia and the Far East: Languages and Cultures are systematized scientific data on the historical, cultural, socio-anthropological and linguistic diversity of the indigenous peoples of the North, Siberia and the Far East.

Interactive Atlas of Indigenous Peoples of the North, Siberia and the Far East: Languages and Cultures are implemented on the principles of technological sovereignty and collected unique information about the history and culture of indigenous peoples, the beauty of their traditional places of residence, national folklore and peculiarities of the language


Speakers:
Nina Veysalova — Vice President, Russian Association of Indigenous Peoples of the North (RAIPON)
Ilya Shponarsky — Analyst of the Project Office for the development of the "Interactive Atlas of Indigenous Peoples of the North, Siberia and the Far East: Languages and Cultures", Russian State University for the Humanities

08.09.2022
13:00–14:00

Far East Street, House of Indigenous Peoples

Creative Business Forum. Sociocultural Development of Northern Regions

Tourism or a Challenge: What Attracts People to the Arctic?


The Federal Tourism Agency says that the tourist flow to the Arctic has grown by more than 60% from 725,000 to 1,172,000 people a year over the last 10 years. The Arctic and the Northern regions are an attractive destination for sophisticated tourists. Even though the northern territories are among the most unsuitable for guests due to their low temperatures and barren landscapes, they also have mysterious and breath-taking scenery. A trip to these regions can range from a trying overnight ordeal in a tent and hiking around for weeks to a luxury getaway with an outdoor pool and local delicacies from a personal chef.
● What tourism products does the Arctic and the North offer to tourists?
● How can we make the Arctic more accessible while preserving its unique nature?
● How can we identify promising areas and formats, while taking into account the specific features of a territory?
● What impact do cultural events have on regions and how do they help promote national culture?
● What kind of expertise and human resources are needed to develop the tourism industry in the northern territories and where should they be trained?


Moderator:
Leonid Agafonov — Member, Public Council Under the Ministry for the Development of the Russian Far East; Managing Director, EastRussia

Speakers:
Bogdan Bulychev — Traveler; Blogger
Elena Veselova — Director of Development and Strategic Partnerships, Carlton Hotel
Dmitryi Gromov — General Director "Tourism Development and Territorial Marketing Agency"
Alexander Kirilov — Director, National Park Russian Arctic
Vladimir Rusanov — Minister of Tourism of Kamchatka Territory

Front row participant:
Artem Kuksa — First Deputy General Director, Murmansk Region Development Corporation

08.09.2022
14:30–15:50

Far East Street, House of Indigenous Peoples

Development of Human Resources in the Arctic Territories: Goals, Formats, and Opportunities


The Russian Arctic is always under heavy global scrutiny. It is the largest Arctic territory in terms of length and population. Russia is a northern country, which knows how to live in difficult natural conditions like no one else. This provides Russia with undeniable advantages, namely the opportunity to ensure the sustainable development of the entire territory of the country.
Today, Russia’s Arctic territories includes nine rapidly developing regions that require the appropriate level of staffing. This is a serious reason to unite the country’s efforts to transition to new standards of quality of life in the most difficult conditions.

The Arctic Challenge federal programme aims to attract new heroes to the Arctic who are able to integrate into existing regional management teams in order to jointly find effective solutions to unconventional tasks.

What kind of human resources does the Arctic need? What federal projects can help attract human resources to the Arctic region? What needs to be done to attract skilled labour to the Arctic? What prompts established professionals to exchange their usual comfort for challenging uncertainties?


Moderator:
Anna Starikova — Arctic Challenge Project Methodologist

Speakers:
Elvira Nurgalieva — First Deputy General Director for Social Development, Corporation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Angelina Prikhodko — Advisor to the Department for the Implementation of Public Projects of the Office of the Plenipotentiary Representative of the President of the Russian Federation in the Far East
Grigoriy Smolyak — Director of the Social Development Department of the Far East and the Arctic, Ministry of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Yulia Khanzhina — Deputy Director of the Direction "Young Professionals", Agency for Strategic Initiatives

Front row participants:
Andrey Bolenkov — Vice-Governor, Deputy Chairman of the Government, Head of the Department of Education, Culture and Youth Policy of Chukotka Autonomous Region
Dmitry Borisov — Director of the Management Company TOR "Yakutia"
Sergey Kolyadko — CEO of LLC "UK TOR "Chukotka"
Alexander Shutov — Director of the Advanced Development Zone "Capital of the Arctic"