Programme

06.09.2017
10:30–12:00

Building A, level 3, Conference hall 16

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Renewable Energy: The Outlook for Supplying Energy to Remote Regions That Are Not Part of the National Electricity Network


Despite the frenetic pace of development in Asia-Pacific countries, the social and economic growth of important regions is being held back by an inadequate or non-existent supply of energy. To a certain extent, this issue is being addressed by diesel power stations, although the high cost of fuel, including delivery, results in high electricity prices, while diesel facilities already in operation are harmful to the environment. Building power lines for a small number of consumers is not economically viable. At the same time, modernizing existing forms of electricity generation (or creating new ones) which make use of renewable energy sources – primarily solar and wind energy – would significantly decrease the cost of electricity, reduce atmospheric emissions, and create a solution which could be applied to numerous remote, isolated areas. For Russia, this is an issue of great importance: around 20 million people (13.7% of the population) live in regions with a decentralized energy supply. Russia already has experience of building autonomous hybrid solar-diesel and wind-diesel power plants, primarily in the Sakha Republic, the Altai Republic, and the Transbaikal region. Refining these facilities further would, however, require international cooperation, both in terms of manufacturing components and mechanisms, and in helping to develop remote regions. What measures should be implemented in Asia-Pacific countries in order to realize the potential of renewable energy to provide remote regions with an electricity supply? What is the potential for international cooperation between the countries of the Asia-Pacific region in this field? How can existing solutions for remote and isolated regions based on renewable energy sources be applied to third countries in the Asia-Pacific region?


06.09.2017
10:30–12:00

Building B, level 5, Conference hall 3

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Russia–Mongolia: A Meeting Point in the Russian Far East


Relations between Russia and Mongolia have a long history based on a tradition of good neighbourliness, and are orientated towards further development in the spirit of strategic partnership. Mongolia has an enduring interest in Russian technology, and remains a place which cherishes and respects the Russian language and the culture and traditions of Russia’s peoples. Business relations between the two countries recognize the need to bring a new dynamic to bilateral collaboration and to realize the potential of trade and economic cooperation. Areas in which expanded collaboration shows obvious promise include energy, transit, developing border regions, and environmental conservation. Strengthening cooperation between Mongolia and the EAEU could prove to be a strong driver of growth in mutual trade and cross-border economic partnership.
What decisions could provide a fresh boost to bilateral cooperation? In what sectors does cooperation between Russia and Mongolia show the most potential? How can effective collaboration between Russia and Mongolia be ensured in trade regulation, removing barriers to trade, and supporting the flow of goods and investment? What strategic proposals exist for developing bilateral relations?


06.09.2017
10:30–12:00

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 9

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Partnership for Greater Eurasia: Expanding a Future-Oriented Joint Development Space


The Eurasian continent is becoming a flagship example of regional integration, which is focused primarily on the interests of the countries of Greater Eurasia. Developments are taking place in the Eurasian Economic Union (EAEC), the ‘Belt and Road’ economic cooperation system, the initiatives being implemented by ASEAN countries, and the South Asia cooperation programme run under the aegis of India. Ensuring synergy rather than competition between Eurasian projects could advance the interests of all the continent’s nations. This is exactly the idea of the Eurasian Economic Partnership (EEP), or Greater Eurasia: building a space for joint development by creating an economic relations system that takes account of the interests of all of its participants without being tied to the signing of any one collective agreement in particular. How and by what means can the EEP be created? To what extent can the EEP serve both as a common cooperation framework and as a platform for using specific trade and investment mechanisms? What benefits can the establishment of the EEP bring to the region’s countries? How can the experience gained from the success of multilateral trade agreements and pending projects initiated by mega-regional trading blocs be taken into account in the formation of the EEP? What balance between liberalization and protectionism today best meets the interests of EEP member countries and their partners?


06.09.2017
10:30–12:00

Building D, level 5, Conference hall 12

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

The Potential of the Northern Sea Route. From Words to Actions


The Northern Sea Route is the shortest sea route from Asia to Europe, and experts estimate that by 2050 it will be passable for non-ice reinforced vessels all year round. Taking this into consideration, it is strategically advisable at this point to begin developing the Northern Sea Route for purposes other than simply the transport of natural resources from the Arctic zone, or ‘northern deliveries’. In 2016, a model for establishing a regular Arctic container line using the Northern Sea Route was developed. The niche which will be filled by the Northern Sea Route relates to container cargo transit between the ports of North-East Asia (China, Japan, and South Korea) and those of Northern Europe (Rotterdam, Hamburg, and others), which is preferable to a southern route. Around 455,000 TEUs of container cargo traffic currently have transit paths for which use of the Northern Sea Route would provide a significant advantage to the shipper. An optimal logistics scheme has been developed for a regular Arctic container line: transit will be conducted between two port hubs in the cities of Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky and Murmansk using ice-class container ships, with additional feeder lines to end-ports in Europe or Asia. How can participation in the joint development of the Northern Sea Route be made attractive to China, Japan, and South Korea? Would there be merit in establishing a joint venture to manage a regular Arctic container line? How can competitive conditions for container cargo transit via the Northern Sea Route be ensured? Could investment in Northern Sea Route infrastructure be made profitable in the long term?


06.09.2017
12:45–14:15

Building A, level 3, Conference hall 17

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

‘Russia’s Gateway to Asia’: The Role of the Russian Far East in Asia-Pacific Integration Initiatives


Asia today is growing ever more self-reliant, and, accordingly, more closed-off externally and more open and competitive internally as a market. Other EAEU countries can gain access to this market via the Russian Far East. To safeguard its own interests to the greatest extent possible, it is important for the region to take on a proactive role, cooperating with the Eurasian Economic Commission (EEC) in two key international areas of its activity in the coming years: coupling together the EAEU and the Belt and Road initiative, and concluding free trade agreements with partners in the Asia-Pacific region. The Russian Far East is the part of both Russia and the Eurasian Economic Union, which is situated directly in the Asia-Pacific region, and taking its interests into consideration is vital when building a long-term format for relations with countries of the region. What needs does the Russian Far East have with respect to integration processes in the Asia-Pacific region? How far are the parties prepared to go on the question of creating a free trade zone? To what extent would this be in the interests of the Russian Far East? Could the ‘coupling’ be open for other regional partners to join? Where do participants view a role for the institutions of the EAEU, and where can there be bilateral tracks within the ‘coupling’? How can investment in the Russian Far East be stimulated using free trade zones?


06.09.2017
12:45–14:15

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 8

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Competitive Law and the International Arbitration Centre in the Russian Far East


Guarantees for the protection of ownership rights, together with access to effective channels for resolving disputes with counterparties, are of significant importance in the decision as to whether to expand a business into a particular region. The examples of Hong Kong and Singapore show that the presence of competitive systems of law and independent centres of arbitration in these jurisdictions has been an important factor in the development of Asian economic centres. Could the Free Port of Vladivostok repeat the successes of Hong Kong and Singapore in establishing competitive systems for law and arbitration? And if so, how can this be achieved? How should a new arbitration centre in Vladivostok go about winning the confidence of Russian and international investors? Could it be possible to establish an Asian axis of arbitration linking Vladivostok, Beijing, Hong Kong and Singapore?


06.09.2017
12:45–14:15

Building B, level 7, Conference hall 5

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

The Asian Energy Ring. Are Politicians and Energy Companies Ready?


Current and projected energy demand in the Asia-Pacific region is enormous. At the same time, in many countries of the region it is precisely a lack of access to energy, which is acting as a brake on continued high growth rates. The launch of huge international energy projects is a key global trend. Projects like these help to address the disparity in access to energy resources, to calm price volatility, and to achieve political stability and regional economic development. To ensure comprehensive integration of these projects and to create a new configuration of connected energy networks, it is essential to set up a single technological platform for the electricity grid. Digital transformation, standardization, and ensuring a new level of energy security are all vital conditions for this. These challenges create a far-reaching opportunity to carry out scientific research in the field of electricity transmission, to establish new standards for managing a new-generation network, to ensure the integration of different sources of generation and smart users, and to provide cyber security. Science could become a key driver behind the creation of a platform for integrated energy networks in North-East Asia. The establishment of an Asian super-ring connecting Russia, China, Japan, South Korea, Mongolia, and possibly additional countries has the potential to solve many of the problems threatening sustainable development in the region, and could lead to enduring, mutually beneficial collaboration, not only in energy, but in a number of other sectors as well. What regulatory changes are necessary in order for such a project to be realized? Do the economic implications surrounding existing electricity transmission technologies make projects to integrate energy networks in North-East Asia viable, or is it vital to invent new, ground-breaking technologies? To what extent should technological solutions for integrated energy networks be standardized? What is the economic viability of implementing such a project, and what financial models have been used to implement similar projects?


06.09.2017
15:15–16:45

Building A, level 5, Conference hall 10

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

The Export Potential of the Russian Far East. Meeting Growing Demand in the Asia-Pacific Region


One of the key challenges posed by the creation of favourable conditions for investment in the Russian Far East lies in establishing a system for delivering regional goods to the rapidly expanding markets of the Asia-Pacific region; in particular, to markets in which the consumer represents the major economic class of modern Asia – the urban middle class. Here, the Russian Far East is in competition, not only with national Asian producers, but also with companies from the USA and Europe who have already been exporting to these markets for some time. These export competitors already enjoy the support of their Asian partners and their governments, through chambers of commerce and export-import banks. These invest directly in information, networking with Asian regulatory bodies, engaging Asian experts to do outreach work with exporters, and assisting exporters by organizing industry and marketing research in their interests. A full range of tools are used by the government in support of exports. What barriers are hindering the export of goods from the Russian Far East? How can a support system for exports from the Russian Far East be formed on a governmental and intergovernmental level? What are the most effective channels for promoting export-oriented goods produced in the Russian Far East? What role could be played by electronic platforms? How can a marketing strategy for Russian Far Eastern goods be implemented, and a ‘Made in the Russian Far East’ brand be created to promote them on foreign markets?


06.09.2017
15:15–16:45

Building A, level 8, Conference hall 11

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Pandemic Preparedness as a Condition of Sustainable Economic Growth in the Asia-Pacific Region


The Asia-Pacific region is among the most vulnerable to the threat of pandemic. The spread of infection has an impact on many sectors, including trade, investment, tourism, medicine, and scientific and technological cooperation. Losses caused by new (highly pathogenic influenza, the Zika virus, coronavirus) and well-known (HIV/AIDS, dengue fever, malaria) infections in a region can amount to billions of dollars, but they can be avoided. To make this possible, rapidly growing economic and social links in the region should be accompanied by investment in strengthening epidemic warning and reaction systems, and in developing intergovernmental cooperation on a regional level. This will reduce the negative effects of pandemics on the economy and the progress of integration processes, and increase investment attractiveness. The key to increasing preparedness and the ability to react to a pandemic in the Asia-Pacific region lies in political commitment to cooperation in this area, developing collaboration between healthcare services, and scientific and technological cooperation in research and development to identify new means of diagnosing and preventing infection. Is the Asia-Pacific region prepared for the next pandemic? What weak points are there in existing systems for controlling epidemics in the region? Would it be possible to create a single international epidemic warning and reaction system in the region? What could Russia and other states in the region contribute to the creation of such a system? What are the priorities for scientific and technological cooperation between countries in the region in order to increase readiness to deal with the threat of infection? What incentives exist to encourage private sector investment in healthcare, scientific and technological cooperation to counter pandemics in the Asia-Pacific region?


06.09.2017
15:15–16:45

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 6

Valdai Club Session

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

The Russia–China–Japan–US Quadrangle: Are There Opportunities for Cooperation?


A session devoted to discussing new opportunities for multilateral cooperation in Asia. The context for such a discussion is provided by the continuation of ‘Russia’s turn pivot to the East’, changes in USA regional and global policy, the strengthening of the multifaceted partnership between Russia and China, and the spirit of cooperation pervading Russian-Japanese relations. Although contradictions and disagreements on important issues exist between the countries of the Asian region, Asia should not be allowed to become a region divided by zones of influence and competition between groupings of states. The refusal of the USA to participate in projects regarded by the previous administration as a means of containing China and, in part, Russia, could open up new opportunities for multilateral cooperation. Russia needs to further strengthen its position in Asia through collaboration with all of the important players in the region, and to engage them in projects to develop the Russian Far East and deepen its integration into regional and global markets. It is the relationships that exist within the Russia-China-USA-Japan quadrangle that could eventually become a basis for cooperation and coordination of interests which is beneficial to all. A practical agenda for such cooperation must be formed now, through substantive discussion of its participants’ approaches to the political and economic development of Asia and the world as a whole.


06.09.2017
15:15–16:45

Building D, level 5, Conference hall 15

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

International space projects in the Asia-Pacific region


Today, the development of space-related activities and rapid progress in the field of applied space systems and research have created a solid foundation for intensifying international cooperation in this area. These trends are emerging most clearly in the Asia-Pacific region. What kinds of areas of space-related activity are of particular interest for cooperation in the Asia-Pacific region? How may regional international organizations assist in identifying and advancing large-scale, multilateral space projects?


06.09.2017
17:15–18:45

Building D, level 5, Conference hall 12

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

The Fight Against Social Inequality and Polarization in Countries of the Asia-Pacific Region


The risks arising from growing social inequality have been discussed by international experts for a number of years. On the basis of UN data for 2017, it is clear that social inequality is far more pronounced than anyone had assumed: 3.6 billion people on the planet lack the basic essentials and many cannot afford to go to school or to visit the doctor. Reducing the scale of social inequality in the Asia-Pacific region will be of crucial importance in achieving the objective of reducing social inequality at the international level. What policies for reducing social inequality are being pursued by the countries of the Asia-Pacific region in order to protect disadvantaged groups? What programmes and ideas for reducing social polarization have already been implemented? Will these prove effective in the long-term? If not, what urgent steps must be taken?


06.09.2017
17:30–19:00

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 8

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Logistics in Russia and Asia-Pacific Interconnect under China’s Belt and Road Initiative

In partnership with FESCO

China is moving its Belt and Road initiative from a framework discussion phase to tangible projects, establishing the preconditions for the development of routes across Russia with the active involvement of major players in the Russian transport industry. Sino-Russian cooperation in this area is supported by the two countries’ heads of state, who signed a joint declaration on cooperation to connect the Eurasian Economic Union and the Silk Road Economic Belt. Freight owners in Asia-Pacific countries currently spend up to USD 1 billion per year on transporting freight by sea (bypassing Russia). If Russian and Chinese transport companies begin offering cheaper and more convenient services, up to 30% of freight could be transported by land across China and Russia rather than by sea. How should Russia make the most of the opportunities presented by China’s Belt and Road initiative? What action is already being taken by market players to develop the country’s transit potential, such as overland routes along the Trans-Siberian Railway? What limiting factors are currently preventing freight traffic in Asia-Pacific countries, like China, from being connected to Russian transit routes? What steps need to be taken by the Chinese and Russian governments in the near future to create conditions that will foster increased cooperation in this area?


06.09.2017
17:30–19:00

Building B, level 7, Conference hall 5

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Connecting Europe and Asia. International Transport Corridors in the Russian Far East


An important project for realizing the transit potential of the Russian Far East is the development of the international transport corridors ‘Primorye 1’ and ‘Primorye 2’, linking the north-eastern provinces of China with ports in the south of Primorsky Territory. The potential total cargo base of these is estimated at around 45 million tonnes annually. It is the objective of both countries’ governments to make the transit of cargo through these corridors ‘seamless’ and competitive. Between 2016 and 2017, Russia for its part has adopted a full range of practical solutions for creating attractive conditions for cargo transit via international transport corridors: a 24-hour regime has been introduced for checkpoint operation together with simplified and fast-tracked customs control procedures designated for seaports rather than the land border. What action is the Chinese side taking to develop these corridors? When and under what conditions will the construction of new infrastructure for the international transport corridors begin? How will support for investors from both countries be realized as investment projects for the development of transport corridors are implemented? What measures must be taken to create a ‘seamless’ regime, reduce transport costs for shippers, and lower expenses and customs clearance times for transit cargo?


06.09.2017
18:00–19:30

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 6

TV Debates of Russia 24 and the Valdai Discussion Club

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Russia’s Pivot to the East: Outcomes and New Goals


‘Russia’s Turn to the East’ has taken place. This is true both in an international respect – both political and economic – and, more importantly, internally, with measures for the development of Siberia and the Russian Far East, with the creation of the conditions for integrating them into the Asian and European markets. At the same time, Russia is diversifying its links with Asia – the number of highly important partners with which it is strengthening its relations already includes a large group of countries – China, Japan, South Korea, Singapore, and Vietnam. In a changing global environment, it is vital for Russia to build cooperation with its Asian partners. It is equally important that leading European, and perhaps also American players, should be ‘hitched’ to cooperative relationships between Russia, Asia, and Eurasia, both on a state and on a corporate level. A programme of action is needed which will strengthen Russia’s position in Asia and create a critical mass of collaboration and cooperation. This must be achieved first and foremost in economic terms, in order to make the country a fully-fledged Atlantic-Pacific power of the future. It is likewise important now to confirm Russia’s negotiating position – what do we want from our partners? It is vital that we address our partners in Asia with a clear and precise message, indicating what areas and topics in our relations with them are optimal for Russia from the point of view of the challenges posed by her internal development.


07.09.2017
09:00–10:30

Building A, level 5, Conference hall 10

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Healthcare Investment in the Asia-Pacific Region: The Economic and Social Impact


Accessible healthcare services for all sectors of the population is the most important principle of inclusive economic growth in the countries of the Asia-Pacific region, together with income equality, accessible education, and environmental protection. In investing in healthcare, business is interested in returns, and the government in extending the life expectancy of its citizens, as well as their working lives, and accelerating the pace of economic growth. How is a balance between the interests of the private sector and the state ensured in healthcare in Asia-Pacific region countries? What are the key trends in healthcare development in the Asia-Pacific region? How can the Russian Far East make use of the concrete advantages of Asia-Pacific healthcare systems for its own development?


07.09.2017
09:00–10:30

Building D, level 5, Conference hall 15

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

The Atom as a Carbon-Free Basis for the Energy Sector of the Future in the Asia Pacific Region


The Asian-Pacific Region is one of the largest world centres of international trade, financial resources and modern production. It is of principal importance to create energy systems on the basis of carbon-free sources in the countries of the region to ensure high growth and intensive industrial high-technological development along with compliance with the commitments in the area of struggle against the climate change. In this respect, the development of nuclear power is of special significance. Nuclear already takes about 10 % in the total energy mix of the region, the region itself is the focal point for growth of nuclear capacities. What challenges face countries in the region in developing their energy programmes? What are the high-demand solutions and what effect are new and developing nuclear generation capabilities having on the region?


07.09.2017
11:30–13:00

Building A, level 3, Conference hall 16

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Competitive Customs Regulation: Best Practices in the Asia-Pacific Region


Russia has taken unprecedented steps in recent years to implement specialized regulations targeted at the development of the Russian Far East. Many of the practices being applied in state regulation are unique for Russia. A range of measures for simplifying customs procedures are presently being implemented in the advanced special economic zones and in the Free Port of Vladivostok, but in the face of strong competition for investors from the Asia-Pacific region these may prove insufficient. What practical results have been achieved thanks to the introduction of special customs regulations in the advanced special social and economic zones and in the Free Port of Vladivostok? Do the new customs instruments reflect the successful practices of Asia-Pacific region countries? What promising new technologies make it possible to increase the efficiency of customs operations and reduce administrative burden on foreign trade operators? What next steps should be taken to improve customs regulation mechanisms?


07.09.2017
11:30–13:00

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 6

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

New Technologies in the Asia-Pacific Financial Sector. How Blockchain is Transforming Reality


Perhaps nowhere more than in the financial sector do trust and the availability of intermediary chains play such a crucial role. Blockchain technology is potentially able to replace both, and to increase drastically the productivity in the sector. Recent direct investment in this area has amounted to nearly USD 2 billion, with more than 500 companies emerging. On the other hand, no breakthroughs have been seen yet, except for virtual currency ones. The key to the success of blockchain technology is the definition and harmonization of common standards as a key prerequisite. As no such common standards have been found and instated yet, there is a window of opportunity for the Asia-Pacific region. Once the standard is defined, everybody will follow the leader. By choosing a relevant direction for itself and combining and coordinating its efforts, the region could set a sufficient impetus for establishing a worldwide standard and achieving further dissemination and adoption of blockchain technology. How does blockchain technology affect the financial sector, and what realistic potential does it offer? What role can Russia and its Far East play in the development of blockchain technology? What are the success factors, and what is the model for international interaction and management?


07.09.2017
11:30–13:00

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 7

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Increasing Academic Mobility in the Asia-Pacific Region


The intensification in transnational flows of information, capital, and technology has created a situation in which labour markets and educational services have expanded beyond their own national borders. In the last decades, practically all developed countries have implemented numerous reforms to their education systems, including in their programmes such crucial components as internationalization, and investing enormous financial resources into them. In this context, it is in the interests of practically all Asia-Pacific region countries to invest in a more forward-looking strategy to development human resource potential in the region. What strategies for internationalization at institutions of higher learning in the Asia-Pacific region appear the most forward-looking? Is it possible to identify universal mechanisms for developing internationalization in higher education which can be applied just as effectively to the region as a whole? What are the most acute obstacles to developing academic mobility? The challenges and prospects of establishing a single educational space in the region. Experience from mutual recognition of educational courses and diplomas.


07.09.2017
11:30–13:00

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 9

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Smart Energy: Balancing Demand with Capacity. New Projects

In partnership with En+ Group

The major revolutionary breakthroughs of the last 300 years have been possible thanks to the discovery of new kinds of fuel. Starting with hydropower during the industrial revolution, it was then the turn of hydrocarbon-based fuels: coal, oil, and gas – and now the world awaits the full arrival of renewable energy sources. But today the development of IT and technology is creating colossal opportunities for optimizing how we use energy and increasing energy efficiency – and it’s entirely possible that the results could amount to a new energy revolution. What is the present demand from the world economy for new energy technologies? What impact will big data, machine learning and other ‘smart’ technologies have on this highly traditional sector of the economy? Could the Russian Far East become a ‘smart’ energy hub for the Asia-Pacific region? What would be needed in order to achieve this, and what is the realistic potential of Russia’s Far East taking into consideration its numerous competitive neighbours who are already engaging actively with the smart energy era?


07.09.2017
11:30–13:00

Building B, level 7, Conference hall 4

Sberbank Workshop

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Cybercrime: The Key Threat to the Digital Economy


Due to explosive growth of technologies, the most innovative actors in the international community have been transitioning to the digital economy, Russia being one of the leading participants in this “race”. The total “digitalization” and other disruptive processes force Asia-Pacific companies to change their conventional practices and approaches to doing business, which means overhauling management models. The increasing take-up of AI, Big Data, Blockchain in traditional sectors of economy is enabling people on the planet to break-through to much higher living standards. The unfortunate truth is that the criminal world adapts to technological changes very quickly, and we are all becoming unwilling witnesses of international businesses falling victims to cyberattacks. Such attacks are becoming increasingly targeted, automated, simple to manage and wide-spread, whereas hacker communities are becoming ever higher organized and international. Not only conventional businesses are threatened. For example, attacks on electronic exchanges and wallet management systems of several cryptocurrencies based on blockchain inflicted damage equivalent to USD 100 million last year. Sberbank, as the largest financial institution in Russia, CIS and Eastern Europe, encounters cyberattacks every day and is keenly aware that only united efforts of state institutions, financial and corporate sectors of the world economy in fighting cyberthreats can pave a secure way for a transition to our digital future. How can Far East companies in Russia get securely integrated into the ecosystem of a digital business? How can Asia-Pacific nations interact effectively in fighting cybercrime?


07.09.2017
17:00–18:30

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 8

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Fostering Cooperation from Lisbon to Vladivostok: Vladivostok!


The key tasks the ‘From Lisbon to Vladivostok’ project is designed to address are promoting the development of international cooperation and joint activities from Lisbon to Vladivostok, and establishing and coordinating further bilateral and multilateral relations between EAEU member countries and EU partners. The Eurasian Economic Union (EAEU) is one of the centres around which the Greater Eurasian partnership is being formed. The formation of a Greater Eurasia is a necessary but insufficient prerequisite for the growth of trade on the Eurasian continent, and one of the future pillars of the world economy. Are the interested parties ready to start implementing this megaproject now? What steps can be taken to start forming a Greater Eurasia now, despite political difficulties? How do we ensure Russia’s involvement in the Silk Road Economic Belt project? Which economic cooperation model will most benefit trade between the EU and the EAEU? What infrastructure projects need to be implemented in the Russian Far East to fully connect the region to European integration processes?