Programme

07.09.2017
09:00–10:30

Building A, level 8, Conference hall 11

Demographic Policy. New Residents in the Far East

Developing air transport in the Far Eastern Federal District. What’s next?


The development of aviation in the Far Eastern Federal District is an important part of improving quality of life in the region. A special government approach is required to boost programmes aimed at expanding air transport in the Russian Far East. Both federal and regional subsidy programmes are used to ensure that flights are affordable. A prominent example of such support is the Primorsky Territory programme which includes upgrading of the aircraft fleet. This session will discuss how to achieve balanced growth of local and regional transport and upgrade aircraft and airport infrastructure. How will passengers benefit from the measures proposed? The major priority concerning transport is the issue of affordability. What measures are programmes proposing to ensure affordability? Would it be better to create a new programme for developing aviation in the Far Eastern Federal District, or to make improvements to the existing ones? What stages and deadlines are there for implementing programmes? What is needed to achieve them?


07.09.2017
09:00–10:30

Building A, level 3, Conference hall 16

Doing Business in the Russian Far East

Russky Island: The Onset of Creating a New Centre for International Cooperation and Cutting-Edge Technologies in the Asia-Pacific Region


Russky Island, which throughout its history has been an impregnable fortress protecting Russia’s eastern shores, is becoming a symbol of Russia’s openness to neighbourly and mutually beneficial relationships with the countries of the Asia-Pacific region. In 2017 the Russian Government adopted a programme for the development of Russky Island as a centre for international collaboration and cutting-edge technologies in the Asia-Pacific region. The island will become the location of an exhibition and convention centre, a new university city, a techno-innovation park, a centre for nuclear medicine, a centre for shipbuilding engineering, a centre for the export of electricity, and a biotechnopark. What investment projects could be implemented on Russky Island? What plans for projects on the island which have already been announced by investors require government support? What conditions should the government create on the island in order to attract investment from cutting-edge technology companies?


07.09.2017
09:00–10:30

Building A, level 3, Conference hall 17

Business Dialogue

Russia–China


Eighty percent of investment in the Russian Far East from the Asia-Pacific region over the last two years has come from Chinese companies. Altogether, more than 20 investment projects, with a total investment value of over USD 3 billion, are being implemented in the macroregion with the participation of Chinese capital. Chinese companies have also announced plans to implement other major projects in the Russian Far East, including construction of a pulp mill and a new sea port. Intensive construction is under way on cross-border transport projects which will connect the Russian and Chinese economies and produce a large multiplier effect for regions in both countries. Within the last year, a project to develop international transport corridors has progressed to the practical stage. The corridors will link the north-eastern provinces of China with the ports of Primorsky Territory. An agreement has been signed between the relevant agencies in the two countries to create a seamless regime for the transit of Chinese cargo via the corridor. This project is a practical example of the linking of the Eurasian Economic Union with the Belt and Road initiative. In order to increase levels of trade, economic, and investment cooperation, new intergovernmental mechanisms have been developed and a Far East centre for supporting Chinese investors has been created. Which projects have already been realized in the Russian Far East with the participation of Chinese capital and have demonstrated their viability? Which are in the early phase? What are the obstacles to their implementation? What mechanisms could become additional drivers of growth in the flow of investment into the Russian Far East from China? What effects can businesses in both countries expect from the launch of the new cross-border corridors?


07.09.2017
09:00–10:30

Building A, level 5, Conference hall 10

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Healthcare Investment in the Asia-Pacific Region: The Economic and Social Impact


Accessible healthcare services for all sectors of the population is the most important principle of inclusive economic growth in the countries of the Asia-Pacific region, together with income equality, accessible education, and environmental protection. In investing in healthcare, business is interested in returns, and the government in extending the life expectancy of its citizens, as well as their working lives, and accelerating the pace of economic growth. How is a balance between the interests of the private sector and the state ensured in healthcare in Asia-Pacific region countries? What are the key trends in healthcare development in the Asia-Pacific region? How can the Russian Far East make use of the concrete advantages of Asia-Pacific healthcare systems for its own development?


07.09.2017
09:00–10:30

Building A, level 8, Conference hall 11

Demographic Policy. New Residents in the Far East

Developing Air Transport in the Far Eastern Federal District. What’s Next?


The development of aviation in the Far Eastern Federal District is an important part of improving quality of life in the region. A special government approach is required to boost programmes aimed at expanding air transport in the Russian Far East. Both federal and regional subsidy programmes are used to ensure that flights are affordable. A prominent example of such support is the Primorsky Territory programme which includes upgrading of the aircraft fleet. This session will discuss how to achieve balanced growth of local and regional transport and upgrade aircraft and airport infrastructure. How will passengers benefit from the measures proposed? The major priority concerning transport is the issue of affordability. What measures are programmes proposing to ensure affordability? Would it be better to create a new programme for developing aviation in the Far Eastern Federal District, or to make improvements to the existing ones? What stages and deadlines are there for implementing programmes? What is needed to achieve them?


07.09.2017
09:00–10:30

Building B, level 5, Conference hall 3

Business Dialogue

Russia–Japan


One year on from the launch of joint work on an eight-point plan for economic cooperation proposed by Japanese Prime Minister Shinzō Abe, it is possible to speak of a significant uptick in cooperation between businesses in the two countries. Discussions on joint investment projects in the oil and gas sector, agriculture, healthcare, and infrastructure have entered the practical stage. Many of these projects are connected with the Russian Far East. Negotiations have intensified between Russian and Japanese companies on the construction of a gas pipeline and a maritime energy bridge to supply electricity to Japan. Companies are especially interested in collaboration on renewable energy projects. In accordance with a Russian Government decision, from 1 August 2017, visa entry for Japanese citizens entering Vladivostok Free Port will be simplified (by the introduction of electronic visas). This will not only make it easier to do business, but also facilitate the continuing growth in tourist flows from Japan to the Russian Far East. In order to increase Japanese investment in the Russian Far East, a special company has been created jointly with the Japan Bank for International Cooperation. What projects are already being implemented by Japanese companies in the Russian Far East? What is the key to the success of these projects? What misgivings are preventing Japanese companies from investing in the Russian Far East? How can their confidence be strengthened? Which sectors are the most promising? What improvements are required in each sector from a regulatory point of view?


07.09.2017
09:00–10:30

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 6

Economic Policy in Russia’s East: What’s Next?

Advanced Special Economic Zones 2.0. The View from Investors


Faced with the considerable challenges of developing infrastructure and significantly expanding production in order to meet the needs of a rapidly growing middle class in the Asia-Pacific region, an intense battle for investment has begun. Asia-Pacific countries are developing and implementing more and more incentive schemes for investors as they seek to create the best conditions for doing business. In order to create a business environment in the Russian Far East which can compete with those found in the major centres of the Asia-Pacific region, and to attract private investment into the macroregion, advanced special economic zones (ASEZs) have been set up. These are stand-alone production sites, into which the government invests to establish the infrastructure investors need. The government also provides investors in these zones with tax incentives and essential government services under simplified arrangements. Since 2015, 17 ASEZs have been set up, in which more than 300 investment projects are being implemented and 20 new production facilities have been created with the help of capital from Russia, China, Japan, Australia, Singapore, and other countries. How do investors rate the effectiveness of the ASEZ programme and its influence on the economic viability of projects? What changes should be made to ASEZs to increase profitability and reduce the risk to investors? How competitive is the ASEZ programme compared to the incentives offered by leading Asia-Pacific countries to attract investment? What best practices from special economic zones in the Asia-Pacific region should be used to develop ASEZs? ASEZs are managed by companies owned jointly with Japan, South Korea, China and other countries: is it possible to count on significant growth in investment from the Asia-Pacific region? Digitizing ASEZs – a solution to the problem of the administrative burden faced by investors?


07.09.2017
09:00–10:30

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 7

The Russian Far East: Creating a New Quality of Life by Responding to Challenges

Environmental Consequences of Emergency Situations: Topical Problems and How to Solve Them


Russia’s Ministry of Emergency Situations is taking active steps to implement a set of measures aimed at improving day-to-day safety for the population and businesses alike, and developing modern approaches to increase the effectiveness of measures to protect people and territories from emergency situations, including those carrying environmental consequences. An important area of focus is international cooperation on issues regarding environmental safety and dealing with the aftermath of environmental disasters. What trends, both in Russia and worldwide, can be observed in mitigating the impact of environmental disasters on the national economy? What is the role and significance of international cooperation in combating the environmental consequences of disasters? How does effective coordination between different ministries and agencies result in mitigating the environmental impact of natural disasters?


07.09.2017
09:00–10:30

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 8

The Russian Far East: Creating a New Quality of Life by Responding to Challenges

Developing Borderland Territories in the Russian East: Opportunities and Challenges


Their geostrategic location and existing economic potential of their natural environment make the border regions of the Russian Far East stand out as the most attractive regions for investment and economic activity. At the present time, these regions are home to the majority of ASEZs, and a free port regime is in operation. Major cross-border transport infrastructure will be completed in 2018–2019. With limited local budgets, how can authorities keep pace with economic processes while ensuring that the local population, the incoming workforce and visitors to the border regions have access to high-quality infrastructure and public services in a timely manner? Are government support measures for geopolitically important regions sufficient? What steps need to be taken to activate cross-border cooperation as a driver for the development of border regions?


07.09.2017
09:00–10:30

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 9

Economic Policy in Russia’s East: What’s Next?

The ‘Far Eastern Hectare’: Initial Experiences


2016 saw the launch of a programme allocating free land in the Russian Far East, the key objectives of which were to attract new inhabitants to settle in the Far East and to stimulate entrepreneurial activity in the macroregion by providing maximally simplified and convenient access to a fundamental economic resource – land. Under the program, any Russian citizen can apply to be allocated up to 1 hectare of land anywhere in the Russian Far East (with the exclusion of territories where it is directly forbidden by law). They may use the land free-of-charge for any legal purpose for a period of 5 years, and if they have succeed in making use of it by the end of this period, it will be transferred to their ownership, again free of charge? More than 25,000 people have already become participants in the program, with the total number of applications submitted for a ‘Far Eastern hectare’ exceeding the 100,000 mark. The first ‘Far Eastern hectares’: why are people accepting land in the Russian Far East, and what use do they plan to make of it? What improvements must be made to the ‘Far Eastern hectare’ law and to the online applications system (available at надальнийвосток.рф) Easy money for ‘Far Eastern hectare’ recipients: what proposals are the government making, and how easy are they to achieve? New populated areas on the ‘Far Eastern hectares’: when will infrastructure appear? ‘Far Eastern hectares’ for business purposes: a new stage in the development of workers’ settlements? How can the programme be made more attractive, and 100,000 applications transformed into 1 million?


07.09.2017
09:00–10:30

Building B, level 7, Conference hall 5

Economic Policy in Russia’s East: What’s Next?

Entrepreneurship in the Russian Far East: Risks and Protection


The level of administrative pressure on business and the negative impact of law-enforcement and regulatory bodies on the work of entrepreneurs is as significant a factor in the global competitiveness of regions as, for example, the tax burden or labour costs. As demonstrated by the 2017 Russian Regional Investment Climate Index, administrative pressure on business in the regions of the Russian Far East is two-and-a-half times greater than that found in top-rated regions. In the ASEZs and Vladivostok Free Port, however, special mechanisms are in place to protect investors from the excessive attentions of regulatory bodies. What major risks do investors in the Russian Far East see in working with the government? How well protected do they feel? How efficient and effective are mechanisms in place to protect investors in ASEZs and the Free Port? Is it possible to achieve full trust in businesses and no checks on entrepreneurs? How can government compensation for economic losses suffered by businesses be made standard?


07.09.2017
09:00–10:30

Building D, level 5, Conference hall 12

Economic Policy in Russia’s East: What’s Next?

Support for Major Investment Projects. What Now?


Weak development of transport and energy infrastructure is one of the key factors hindering the implementation of major investment projects in the Russian Far East. In response to this problem, a mechanism for delivering targeted infrastructure support to investors in the Russian Far East was developed and launched in 2015. The key purpose of this mechanism is to make state funding available to build the infrastructure which is vital for the commissioning of new production facilities. The resources are made available free-of-charge and no repayment is required. The infrastructure created remains the property of the investor. Fourteen investors have already used this mechanism to launch their projects. Some of them had been unable to proceed for several years, or even decades, prior to the availability of government assistance of this kind. Has the infrastructure subsidy mechanism lived up to the expectations of investors and the government? To what extent has it already made its mark on ROI and the profitability of private investment? How much funding is available and how many projects will it be sufficient to support? How will a new tool for providing support – tax incentives in exchange for investment in infrastructure – function? What new steps must be taken by the government to attract major investment to the region?


07.09.2017
09:00–13:00

Building D, level 5, Conference hall 14

Seminar

‘Intellectual Property: A Regional Development Tool’ International Forum

World Intellectual Property Organization Global Services. International Registration Systems


The developing global economy is determining a new trend in the submission of applications to register objects of intellectual property, and confronting rights holders with the issue of expanding the geographical scope of their legal protection. The need to protect intellectual property rights simultaneously in several countries is creating a requirement for convenient and economical mechanisms for registering intellectual property objects and managing them throughout the world. Is it possible to protect objects of intellectual property in a large number of countries by submitting just one international application? Is it possible to pay a single set of fees in order to receive immediate protection in many countries? The seminar will present international systems for registering inventions, trademarks, and industrial designs: the Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT), the Madrid Agreement, and the Hague Agreement. Who can benefit from the PCT and the Madrid and Hague systems? What are the advantages of using these frameworks? Does a single, centralized system for trademarks exist? The seminar will also present global intellectual property databases and tools for a knowledge-based economy, as well as alternative options for settling intellectual property disputes. How well developed is the global intellectual property infrastructure? Aside from legal proceedings, what options are available for settling disputes over intellectual rights?


07.09.2017
09:00–10:30

Building D, level 5, Conference hall 15

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

The Atom as a Carbon-Free Basis for the Energy Sector of the Future in the Asia Pacific Region


The Asian-Pacific Region is one of the largest world centres of international trade, financial resources and modern production. It is of principal importance to create energy systems on the basis of carbon-free sources in the countries of the region to ensure high growth and intensive industrial high-technological development along with compliance with the commitments in the area of struggle against the climate change. In this respect, the development of nuclear power is of special significance. Nuclear already takes about 10 % in the total energy mix of the region, the region itself is the focal point for growth of nuclear capacities. What challenges face countries in the region in developing their energy programmes? What are the high-demand solutions and what effect are new and developing nuclear generation capabilities having on the region?


07.09.2017
09:30–11:00

Building B, level 7, Conference hall 4

Doing Business in the Russian Far East

Start Up Easy! Developing Small Entrepreneurship


The successful development of small business community ensures sustainable economic growth. Much is being said about the need to support small businesses, yet its share in the gross value added amounts to around 20%. This means that since the adoption of the Federal Law No 209-FZ ‘On the Development of Small and Medium Business in Russia’ there has been no significant growth of this segment. In line with the 2030 SME Development Strategy, 2018 should be designated a Year of Entrepreneurship in Russia. What is to be done to achieve a meaningful result, in the Far East as well as elsewhere in Russia? What do entrepreneurs expect from federal and regional authorities, large companies and banks? How to make small-scale entrepreneurship more popular?


07.09.2017
10:30–11:00

Building A, level 6, ‘Far East Development’ exhibition. Investment projects presentation area

Presentation of investment projects

Projects of Social Development of the Far East: investment in human


The successful economic development of the region and its investment attractiveness largely depend on the well-being of the residents. Within the framework of the block, will be presented projects aimed at improving the social climate of the Far East and creating conditions for improving the quality of life of the population. To analysing the current changes and assessing, the level of social sentiment will allow the presentation of the Human Capital Development Index in the subjects of the Far Eastern Federal District. What is the potential for investment in human in the region? In addition, which tools will help to open it?


07.09.2017
11:10–12:20

Building A, level 6, ‘Far East Development’ exhibition. Investment projects presentation area

Presentation of investment projects

Presentation of Ideas


In modern society, human capital is a key productive factor of development, a generator of proposals and opportunities. In order to identify and replicate the best ideas for the development of "Far-Eastern hectares", the Agency for Human Capital Development in the Far East initiated a special competition. Within the framework of the block, the winners will be presented in the nominations "Agriculture", "Tourism and recreation", "Innovative and technological solutions", "Settlements", "Low-rise housing construction" and "Environmental and socially-oriented activities".


07.09.2017
11:30–13:00

Building A, level 3, Conference hall 16

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Competitive Customs Regulation: Best Practices in the Asia-Pacific Region


Russia has taken unprecedented steps in recent years to implement specialized regulations targeted at the development of the Russian Far East. Many of the practices being applied in state regulation are unique for Russia. A range of measures for simplifying customs procedures are presently being implemented in the advanced special economic zones and in the Free Port of Vladivostok, but in the face of strong competition for investors from the Asia-Pacific region these may prove insufficient. What practical results have been achieved thanks to the introduction of special customs regulations in the advanced special social and economic zones and in the Free Port of Vladivostok? Do the new customs instruments reflect the successful practices of Asia-Pacific region countries? What promising new technologies make it possible to increase the efficiency of customs operations and reduce administrative burden on foreign trade operators? What next steps should be taken to improve customs regulation mechanisms?


07.09.2017
11:30–13:00

Building A, level 3, Conference hall 17

Doing Business in the Russian Far East

Specially Protected Natural Areas: Opportunities for Government and Business


Russia’s national park network is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year. Specially protected natural areas (SPNAs) are an effective means of preserving Russia’s unique biodiversity. At the federal level, 103 state nature reserves, 51 national parks, and 58 state wildlife reserves are classified as SPNAs. According to Russia’s Ministry of Natural Resources, nine new nature reserves, 12 national parks, and two federal wildlife reserves will be created by 2020. The largest SPNAs in Russia’s Far East are the Lazovsky, Sikhote-Alinsky, Komandorsky, Kronotsky, and Kedrovaya Pad nature reserves and the Beringiya and Zov Tigra national parks. These protected sites are intended to serve conservational, educational, scientific, and cultural goals. Ecotourism has been experiencing rapid growth in recent years, but there are a number of issues in this area that require special attention. Are we willing to open Russia’s national park network up to business and tourism? How can we make tourism accessible in SPNAs? What risks do protected sites face if tourist numbers increase? Public–private partnership: what steps does business expect the government to take in order to spark more active involvement in these projects? Cross-border areas in the Russian Far East: intergovernmental cooperation mechanisms to protect ecosystems and rare species. International cooperation: what useful lessons can be learned from the experience of countries in the Asia-Pacific region (Mongolia, India, Thailand) to help develop SPNAs in Russia’s Far East? How can foreign tourists be attracted to SPNAs in Russia’s Far East?


07.09.2017
11:30–13:00

Building A, level 5, Conference hall 10

Doing Business in the Russian Far East

Agricultural Investment. Feeding the Asia-Pacific Region


The Russian Far East is located closer than any other region of the country to the largest and fastest growing market of the Asia-Pacific region, which has a population 20 times the size of Russia’s and 470 times larger than that of the macroregion. The Asia-Pacific Region is home to a rapidly growing middle class, which is the source of an enormous demand for quality and environmentally friendly food products. With its unique geographical location and environment, the Russian Far East could become one of the key suppliers of foodstuffs to the Asia-Pacific region. What trends are there in the demand for food products in the Asia-Pacific region from a medium and a long-term perspective? What food products for the Asia-Pacific region could be produced the most advantageously in the Russian Far East? How can lobbying opportunities be secured for Russian agricultural producers in the Asia-Pacific region? What steps must be taken at a government level to transform the Russian Far East into a key supplier to the highly competitive Asia-Pacific foodstuffs market?


07.09.2017
11:30–13:00

Building A, level 8, Conference hall 11

Doing Business in the Russian Far East

Sea Ports: In Good Hands

In partnership with Port Management Company

The 5.6 thousand miles of the Russian Far Eastern coastline are home to 32 trade and fishing seaports, as well as 300 small ports and port facilities. Together, these account for approximately 35% of all cargo turnover through Russian seaports. However, technical standards at seaports in the Russian Far East do not conform to modern requirements. Only 19% of the total quayside length of these ports is equipped with specialized mooring installations, and only 23% of them have a depth of more than 11 metres. The degree of wear and tear on the majority of mooring installations exceeds 70%. The majority of these facilities remain in state ownership. Amendments to legislation have already been prepared which will make it possible to transfer mooring installations in Russian Far Eastern ports into private ownership. What plans exist for the development of major marine harbours in the Russian Far East? Which ports in the Russian Far East offer the most interesting investment opportunities? What impact will the transfer of quayside installations into private ownership have on the investment attractiveness of Russian Far Eastern ports? How will this mechanism operate? What economic impact have new customs clearance regulations in the Free Port of Vladivostok had on seaports? What further steps should be taken by the government to increase cargo turnover in Russian Far Eastern ports?


07.09.2017
11:30–13:00

Building B, level 5, Conference hall 3

Business Dialogue

Russia–Republic of Korea


Investors from the Republic of Korea are increasing their commitments in regions of the Russian Far East, and discovering for themselves the new investment support mechanisms that are available in the macroregion. The majority of Korean projects are concentrated in the seafood and agroindustrial sectors. At the same time, such projects account for less than 1% of foreign investment into the Russian Far East from Asia-Pacific countries in the last two years. Investors have yet to discover the potential for investment cooperation that exists in such sectors as mineral extraction, logistics, tourism, energy, cutting-edge technology, and medicine. The window of opportunity opening up in relations between Russia and the Republic of Korea is making it possible for this potential to be realized more quickly, and for work to begin on major projects which can benefit business in both countries, such as the construction of a container line for the Northern Sea Route. Moreover, the prerequisites for a sizeable increase in trade turnover will be met by a free trade agreement between Russia and South Korea which is currently under discussion. What is obstructing the flow of Korean investment into the Russian Far East? What solutions does business need from the governments of the two countries in order to operate with confidence in the macroregion? How does Korean business rate the competitiveness of conditions for investing and doing business in the Russian Far East? What experience can South Korea draw on in the Russian Far East to improve the investment climate? Are Russian and Korean businesses interested in implementing megaprojects such as the development of the Northern Sea Route and the creation of an Asian energy ring? What are Russian and Korean businesses expecting from a free trade agreement between Russia and Korea?


07.09.2017
11:30–13:00

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 6

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

New Technologies in the Asia-Pacific Financial Sector. How Blockchain is Transforming Reality


Perhaps nowhere more than in the financial sector do trust and the availability of intermediary chains play such a crucial role. Blockchain technology is potentially able to replace both, and to increase drastically the productivity in the sector. Recent direct investment in this area has amounted to nearly USD 2 billion, with more than 500 companies emerging. On the other hand, no breakthroughs have been seen yet, except for virtual currency ones. The key to the success of blockchain technology is the definition and harmonization of common standards as a key prerequisite. As no such common standards have been found and instated yet, there is a window of opportunity for the Asia-Pacific region. Once the standard is defined, everybody will follow the leader. By choosing a relevant direction for itself and combining and coordinating its efforts, the region could set a sufficient impetus for establishing a worldwide standard and achieving further dissemination and adoption of blockchain technology. How does blockchain technology affect the financial sector, and what realistic potential does it offer? What role can Russia and its Far East play in the development of blockchain technology? What are the success factors, and what is the model for international interaction and management?


07.09.2017
11:30–13:00

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 7

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Increasing Academic Mobility in the Asia-Pacific Region


The intensification in transnational flows of information, capital, and technology has created a situation in which labour markets and educational services have expanded beyond their own national borders. In the last decades, practically all developed countries have implemented numerous reforms to their education systems, including in their programmes such crucial components as internationalization, and investing enormous financial resources into them. In this context, it is in the interests of practically all Asia-Pacific region countries to invest in a more forward-looking strategy to development human resource potential in the region. What strategies for internationalization at institutions of higher learning in the Asia-Pacific region appear the most forward-looking? Is it possible to identify universal mechanisms for developing internationalization in higher education which can be applied just as effectively to the region as a whole? What are the most acute obstacles to developing academic mobility? The challenges and prospects of establishing a single educational space in the region. Experience from mutual recognition of educational courses and diplomas.


07.09.2017
11:30–13:00

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 8

Economic Policy in Russia’s East: What’s Next?

Bonds as a Means of Attracting Finance


The eastern regions of the Russian Federation possess a strong resource base and an advantageous geographical location, and offer vast and mostly unrealized potential for development. In the current environment, growing the medium and large business sector is, for the most part, impossible without attracting long-term finance. The main sources of financing in the Russian Far East are entrepreneurs’ own funds and bank financing. The potential of the stock market is hardly used at all. The issue of bonds could be used as an alternative source of financing (in relation to bank lending) that would enable business entities to diversify the debt burden on capital, to release collateral, to take their first steps towards the ‘public’ debt market and, as a result, get cheaper funding for further business development. What are the reasons for the low activity of enterprises in the Far East in attracting financing through the obviously advantageous issuance of bonds? What are the ways to increase the attractiveness of bonded loans? Is it possible to attract tens or hundreds of millions of roubles through bonds? How much does an ‘entrance ticket’ to the market cost? What are the ways to optimize costs? How can regional authorities in the Far East help their potential bond issuers? Is it possible to work with foreign investors, given the current sanctions? What mechanisms exist for attracting Asian investment?


07.09.2017
11:30–13:00

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 9

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Smart Energy: Balancing Demand with Capacity. New Projects

In partnership with En+ Group

The major revolutionary breakthroughs of the last 300 years have been possible thanks to the discovery of new kinds of fuel. Starting with hydropower during the industrial revolution, it was then the turn of hydrocarbon-based fuels: coal, oil, and gas – and now the world awaits the full arrival of renewable energy sources. But today the development of IT and technology is creating colossal opportunities for optimizing how we use energy and increasing energy efficiency – and it’s entirely possible that the results could amount to a new energy revolution. What is the present demand from the world economy for new energy technologies? What impact will big data, machine learning and other ‘smart’ technologies have on this highly traditional sector of the economy? Could the Russian Far East become a ‘smart’ energy hub for the Asia-Pacific region? What would be needed in order to achieve this, and what is the realistic potential of Russia’s Far East taking into consideration its numerous competitive neighbours who are already engaging actively with the smart energy era?


07.09.2017
11:30–13:00

Building B, level 7, Conference hall 4

Sberbank Workshop

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Cybercrime: The Key Threat to the Digital Economy


Due to explosive growth of technologies, the most innovative actors in the international community have been transitioning to the digital economy, Russia being one of the leading participants in this “race”. The total “digitalization” and other disruptive processes force Asia-Pacific companies to change their conventional practices and approaches to doing business, which means overhauling management models. The increasing take-up of AI, Big Data, Blockchain in traditional sectors of economy is enabling people on the planet to break-through to much higher living standards. The unfortunate truth is that the criminal world adapts to technological changes very quickly, and we are all becoming unwilling witnesses of international businesses falling victims to cyberattacks. Such attacks are becoming increasingly targeted, automated, simple to manage and wide-spread, whereas hacker communities are becoming ever higher organized and international. Not only conventional businesses are threatened. For example, attacks on electronic exchanges and wallet management systems of several cryptocurrencies based on blockchain inflicted damage equivalent to USD 100 million last year. Sberbank, as the largest financial institution in Russia, CIS and Eastern Europe, encounters cyberattacks every day and is keenly aware that only united efforts of state institutions, financial and corporate sectors of the world economy in fighting cyberthreats can pave a secure way for a transition to our digital future. How can Far East companies in Russia get securely integrated into the ecosystem of a digital business? How can Asia-Pacific nations interact effectively in fighting cybercrime?


07.09.2017
11:30–13:00

Building B, level 7, Conference hall 5

Economic Policy in Russia’s East: What’s Next?

Investments by State Companies. A Focus on Russia’s Far East


In order to accelerate development in the Russian Far East, all available resources must be consolidated with this objective in mind. President of the Russian Federation Vladimir Putin issued an instruction at the first Eastern Economic Forum to make it a special priority to generate finance for the Russian Far East through the activity of state companies. These companies must coordinate their strategic and policy documents with the Ministry for the Development of the Russian Far East with the aim of prioritizing development in the macroregion. This move is aimed at synchronizing plans for the development of the Russian Far East enacted by state programmes and in the policies of state companies. This will significantly increase the effectiveness of state investment in accelerating development in the Russian Far East. At the present time, Gazprom, Rosneft, Transneft, Russian Railways, RusHydro, and FGC UES are already participating in the implementation of strategic projects such as the construction of the Amur Gas Processing Plant, the Far Eastern Petrochemical Complex, and the Zvezda Shipbuilding Complex, and the modernization of the Baikal–Amur Mainline and Trans-Siberian Railway, as well as new power stations and transmission lines. Traditionally in the Russian Far East, it is state companies which have acted as the catalyst for economic processes and which enable the implementation of projects of national importance. Where and in what are state-owned companies planning to invest in the Russian Far East? What support are they counting on? With respect to investment by Russian state companies, how can a multiplier effect be achieved that will accelerate growth in the Russian Far East? How can small and medium-sized businesses in the Russian Far East become participants in the investment programmes of major state-owned companies?


07.09.2017
11:30–13:00

Building D, level 5, Conference hall 12

Demographic Policy. New Residents in the Far East

Culture and Art. What Will Be Done?


A discernible feature of the Russian Far East is its remoteness from traditional spiritual and cultural centres – a remoteness which is keenly felt by its inhabitants. The lack of regional and municipal cultural institutions in the Russian Far East is keenly felt. New facilities must be built, and existing ones modernized. Full use is not being made of the potential for international cultural cooperation, and the potential of Vladivostok as an outpost of Russian culture in Asia has not been sufficiently explored. It is vital to increase the competitiveness and attractiveness of regional cultural projects, on both the Russian and the international stage. What needs to be done to improve the satisfaction of residents of the Russian Far East with the quality of cultural services? Which regional points of cultural growth have been identified as priorities? What projects are set to be implemented in the near future? What is the Russian Ministry of Culture doing to develop the cultural sector in the Russian Far East?


07.09.2017
11:30–13:00

Building D, level 5, Conference hall 15

The Russian Far East: Creating a New Quality of Life by Responding to Challenges

Talent in the Russian Far East: To Import or Nurture?


The effectiveness of talent management is today taking on an ever greater significance for the global competitiveness of a country. In Russia, a range of strategic programs are being implemented to develop talent for participation in efforts to upgrade the country’s scientific and technological base, launching businesses on new markets, and the digital economy. The Russian Far East should not remain on the sidelines as solutions to these challenges are put into effect, and has its own part to play in Russia’s national strategy. The Russian Far East is a territory of great challenges. The very opportunity created by these for self-realization in difficult circumstances could become the ‘business card’ used by the region to attract talent. What role could the Russian Far East play in Russia’s national talent management strategy? Which of the challenges posed by the Russian Far East are on a grand enough scale to attract Russia’s most talented young people? In what way should the Russian Far East participate in global competition for talent?


07.09.2017
12:30–13:30

Building A, level 6, ‘Far East Development’ exhibition. Investment projects presentation area

Presentation of investment projects

Investment Projects in the Production of Building Materials


According to the Ministry of Industry and Trade of the Russian Federation, the share of production of building materials in the Far East is only 0.76% of the total Russian output. The investment projects within this panel are significant both for the region's economy and for local construction companies. The production capacities can totally meet the need of construction companies in heat-insulating materials, ceramic facing bricks, OSB boards and construction ceramics. The session will also present an electronic platform, created specifically for the convenience of communication between investors and project initiators. It will provide you with complete information on all investment projects in the Far East and enter into a dialogue with a potential partner.


07.09.2017
14:00–16:00

Building S, level 3, Plenary session hall

Plenary Session

The Russian Far East: Creating a New Reality


Address by President of the Russian Federation Vladimir Putin

Address by President of the Republic of Korea Moon Jae-in

Address by President of Mongolia Khaltmaagiin Battulga

Address by Prime Minister of Japan Shinzō Abe


07.09.2017
17:00–18:30

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 8

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Fostering Cooperation from Lisbon to Vladivostok: Vladivostok!


The key tasks the ‘From Lisbon to Vladivostok’ project is designed to address are promoting the development of international cooperation and joint activities from Lisbon to Vladivostok, and establishing and coordinating further bilateral and multilateral relations between EAEU member countries and EU partners. The Eurasian Economic Union (EAEU) is one of the centres around which the Greater Eurasian partnership is being formed. The formation of a Greater Eurasia is a necessary but insufficient prerequisite for the growth of trade on the Eurasian continent, and one of the future pillars of the world economy. Are the interested parties ready to start implementing this megaproject now? What steps can be taken to start forming a Greater Eurasia now, despite political difficulties? How do we ensure Russia’s involvement in the Silk Road Economic Belt project? Which economic cooperation model will most benefit trade between the EU and the EAEU? What infrastructure projects need to be implemented in the Russian Far East to fully connect the region to European integration processes?


07.09.2017
17:00–18:30

Building B, level 7, Conference hall 4

Economic Policy in Russia’s East: What’s Next?

Financing Innovation as a Driver of Economic Growth in the Russian Far East

In partnership with Orient Express Bank

The structure of the global economy is set to change fundamentally in the coming years. Not only will new markets emerge; the very foundations of the economy will be transformed. Success will belong to those countries and regions that manage to implement new technologies faster than others. A full complement of key sectors in the Russian Far East are in need of innovative development. Advanced unmanned technologies are essential to the future of agriculture and forestry. The fishing sector requires the latest technologies for freezing, storing, and transporting seafood. The region’s aviation and shipbuilding industries need the advanced manufacturing technologies that are part of the Industry 4.0 paradigm. Without essential robotization, the extractive industries could become uncompetitive in the twenty-first century. What real needs do the sectors of the Russian Far Eastern economy have with respect to innovation? What domestic innovations might be applied in the Russian Far East? Who are the main clients of innovation: the regions or big business? Which institutes for innovative development in Russia are ready to work in the Russian Far East? What financial instruments exist? Is this topic of interest to major investors?


07.09.2017
17:00–18:30

Building B, level 7, Conference hall 5

Doing Business in the Russian Far East

The Russian Far East: An Investor’s Perspective


At the plenary session of the Eastern Economic Forum (EEF) on 3 September 2016, the Russian President stated that Russia’s Far Eastern regions should be taken as a case study of best practice in the work of business support institutions. The session will include a presentation of best practices used in the Business Agent project, and an overview of the results of the ‘mystery shopper’ operation run by the non-profit organization Leaders’ Club, aimed at assessing the quality of the efforts undertaken by institutions in the Russian Far East to attract investment and support business, and evaluating existing development zones. The discussion will focus on problems encountered by Russian and foreign investors in Russia’s Far Eastern regions. Are the Far Eastern regions ready to welcome investors? What are the most effective tools for attracting investors to the Russian Far East?


07.09.2017
17:00–18:30

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 9

The Russian Far East: Creating a New Quality of Life by Responding to Challenges

Government and the Public – Working Together. The Russian Far East as a Region of Social and Public Innovation


Involving inhabitants of the Russian Far East en masse in tackling everyday municipal and regional issues and increasing their level of constructive engagement demands new approaches to creating a system of local self-government and relations between government, public institutions, and active citizens. The foundations of such an undertaking must be improving the system of local self-government; more actively engaging socially oriented non-profits in the provision of social services, together with improving government support mechanisms for non-profits; identifying and supporting active citizens (or ‘doers’) whose efforts create new opportunities to provide good living standards in the Russian Far East and helping them to implement and replicate their projects; and developing the infrastructure of the non-profit sector and the opportunities it can offer non-profit organizations and active citizens. What is the role of civil society institutions in ensuring the forward-looking development of the Russian Far East? What is being done to secure access for non-governmental organizations seeking to provide social services? How are measures to support the non-profit sector being improved, and what opportunities for socially oriented non-profits and active citizens are afforded by the non-profit infrastructure being built today: resource centres and innovation centres in the social sphere?