11.09.2023
10:00–11:30

Building B, level 6, conference hall 6

International Cooperation in a Changed World

Valdai Discussion Club Session

An Open Far East in the World Economy: Achievements and Future Plans


The modern era is characterized by an unprecedented increase in the scale and intensity of Russia's trade and economic ties with Asian countries. This process was catalyzed by the sharp deterioration of the international security situation in Europe. However, the main reason and guarantee of successful Russian-Asian interaction was the accumulated effect of Russia's "pivot to the East," a long-term state strategy for intensifying policy in the Asia-Pacific direction, developing political dialogue with countries of the region and mutual trade and investment. The Far East, a natural hub for including the entire Russian economy in the Asian system of international and economic relations, is at the centre of this policy, which Russia has been pursuing since the beginning of the last decade. Over the past years Russia has implemented a series of programmes to develop the Far East, Siberia and the Arctic, to make them more attractive for Russian and international investors, to create a modern transport and logistics system and to make the region generally connected to the European part of the country and its closest partners in the Asia-Pacific region. This is the foundation on which a fundamentally new, by historical standards, fullscale interaction between Russia and the global economy is being built, based on mutual openness, readiness to develop trade, technological exchange and rejection of politicization of economic relations. The aim of the expert discussion is to assess the achievements already made in this area, the real scale of Russia's increased involvement in the Asian economic environment, along with the new opportunities and development potential of Russia's regions.


Welcome Remark:
Andrey Bystritskiy — Сhairman of the Board of the Foundation for Development and Support of the Valdai Discussion Club

Moderator:
Timofei Bordachev

Panellists:
Anna Bessmertnaya — Chairman of the Commission on Foreign Economic Cooperation with Partners from China, Moscow Chamber of Commerce and Industry of the Russian Federation
Wang Wen — Executive Dean, Chongyang Institute for Financial Studies, Renmin University of China (RDCY)
Sergey Pavlov — First Deputy Managing Director, Russian Railways
Alexander Timchenko — Member of the Board of Directors, FESCO
Yury Trutnev — Deputy Prime Minister of the Russian Federation and Presidential Plenipotentiary Envoy to the Far Eastern Federal District

11.09.2023
10:00–11:30

Building B, level 6, conference hall 10

International Cooperation in a Changed World

Chinese Business in Russia: Prospects for Further Growth


The last year and a half has accelerated the trends of changes in the economic landscape of Russia and its further focus on the leading Eastern economies, driven by the global macroeconomic adjustments of XXI century. Logistics chains are being reshaped, new production facilities are being created, and previously unknown brands are entering the everyday life of Russian citizens, forming radically new consumer habits and patterns. Important role in these process is played by Chinese enterprises, who are actively present in the Russian market. Having taken a leading position in such areas as commercial and light vehicles, telecom equipment and consumer electronics, should we say that Chinese businesses has already reached their peak in the Russian market, or are there even brighter prospects for them?


Moderator:
Alexey Maslov — Director, Institute of Asian and African Studies, Lomonosov Moscow State University

Panellists:
Dmitry Alexeev — General Director, DNS Group LLC
Alexander Vedyakhin — First Deputy Chairman of the Executive Board, Sberbank
Huang Guoliang — General Director, Huaxun Group Ru
Nikita Gusakov — Chief Executive Officer, EXIAR; Senior Vice President, Russian Export Center
Zhou Liqun
Song Liang — General Director, Gezhouba Russ
Alexander Osipov — Governor of Trans-Baikal Territory
Nikolay Stetsko — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Primorsky Territory
Ren Jianchao — General Director, Legendagro Holding
Li Enlin — Blogger

Front row participant:
Vladimir Zhuikov — Executive Director, Investment Department, Russian Direct Investment Fund

11.09.2023
10:00–11:30

Building A, level 3, conference hall 3

International Cooperation in a Changed World

International Social Dialogue in the Digital Environment


Engagement with civil society is currently an effective tool for self-organization of citizens and non-profit organizations to promote democratic principles for the development of society, the peaceful resolution of conflicts, the improvement of the quality of life of the public, and mutual understanding between peoples. In 2021, the Civic Chamber of the Russian Federation was elected as Chair of the International Association of Economic and Social Councils and Similar Institutions, which aims to promote a dialogue based on the values of peace and security, human rights and democracy. The programme of Russia's chairmanship of the Association includes issues of digitalization of socio-economic relations that are relevant for the entire world community. This agenda is of great significance for the entire global community, which is experiencing a boom in digital technologies and their large-scale introduction into all aspects of social and economic life. What are the results of the chairmanship of the Civic Chamber of the Russian Federation in the International Association of Economic and Social Councils and Similar Institutions? How effective are Russian and foreign initiatives and projects in the field of introducing digital services, in particular, in organizing electronic voting? How would we assess the impact of dialogue between the government and society through public feedback on socially important issues? What aspects of the digital transformation of socio-economic relations could help us identify a common pathway for the development of the non-profit sector in Russia and friendly foreign countries as a counterweight to the imposed Western agenda?


Moderator:
Olga Golyshenkova — President, Association of Civilians and Organizations for Corporate Learning and Development MAKO

Panellists:
Oleg Artyugin — Executive Director, Head of the Centre for Development of Artificial Intelligence (AI) Technologies for the Social Good, Sberbank
Irina Bakhtina — Director of Sustainable Development, RUSAL
Andrey Bezrukov — President, Technological Sovereignty Exports Association; Professor, Department of Applied International Analysis, MGIMO University
Micheline Gbeha — Advisor, Economic and Social Council of the Republic of Benin
Elena Martynova — Deputy Head,The Federal Service for State Registration, Cadastre and Cartography (Rosreestr)
Lidia Mikheeva — Secretary, Civic Chamber of the Russian Federation; Chairman of the Board, Research Centre of Private Law under the President of the Russian Federation
Igor Stolyarov — General Director, World Games of the Future; Head, Game of the Future 2024 Project
Zhang Yunyong — Member, Economic and Social Council of the People's Republic of China

Front row participants:
Kseniya Kuznetsova — Acting Head of the Department of Infocommunication Technologies, National University of Science and Technology MISiS
Mikhail Kurakin — Deputy Editor-in-Chief, The International Affairs Magazine; Member of the Union of Journalists of Russia

11.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building D, level 6, conference hall 17

International Cooperation in a Changed World

The Cultural Code of Russian-Chinese Investment Cooperation


Despite sanctions pressure, Russian–Chinese cooperation is growing at a steady pace. Bilateral trade is set to comfortably exceed the psychological barrier of USD 200 billion in 2023. The presence of Chinese companies at the territory of the Russian Federation in the industrial, agricultural, construction, automotive and e-commerce industries is expanding. The number of bilateral projects in the humanitarian and cultural spheres is also increasing. China is becoming an important source of best practices in management and technological innovation. At the same time, we have to recognize the major barriers being faced by investment activity due to both the sanctions regime and the global economic crisis. What are successful and unsuccessful models of bilateral investment cooperation in industrial production, construction and culture? What are the best practices in company management?


Moderators:
Oleg Remyga — Orientalist, Expert, Russian-Chinese Business Council, Russian-Chinese Chamber
Cui Shan — President, Russian-Sino Foundation of Developing Culture and Art

Panellists:
German Maslov — Vice President of Liner and Logistic Division, FESCO
Dmitry Savenkov
Sergey Sanakoev — Deputy Chairman, Russian-Chinese Friendship Society; Deputy Chairman, Russian Part of the Business Council of the Far East of the Russian Federation and the North-East of the People's Republic of China; Member of the Russian International Affairs Council (RIAC)
Elena Stepanova — Associate Professor of the Department of International Management, Institute for Social Sciences, Russian Academy of National Economy and Public Administration under the President of the Russian Federation (RANEPA)
He Zhenwei — Chairman, China Overseas Development Association

11.09.2023
15:00–16:30

Building A, level 3, conference hall 3

International Cooperation in a Changed World

SCO and EAEU Climate Agenda: Moving Towards Common Goals

In partnership with Gazprombank

As the parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change prepare to come together for their Conference, the need has never been greater for communication between countries and, more broadly, blocs of countries on climate issues. It is important that the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation and the Eurasian Economic Union consolidate their positions, as the largest economies in Asia, on important issues of climate regulation, how carbon markets work, and the ambitious commitments made under the Paris Agreement.
Carbon regulation is moving forward in nearly every member of the SCO and EAEU, with each state approaching the task in the light of its own unique, strategically important goals. What unites them all, however, is a balanced approach to climate policy based on the latest scientific data. In Russia, expert decision-making is facilitated by an innovative project of the highest importance: the Unified National System for Monitoring of Climatically Active Substances.
While it is possible for an approach that prioritises national interests to be effective, such does nothing to eliminate risks for alliances with other countries. Mindful of this fact, the SCO and the EAEU have been proactive in adopting a number of programme documents to this end.
What should the SCO and the EAEU be cooperating on first and foremost within the climate agenda, and could it actually drive economic growth? What role should science and data from monitoring and forecasting play in the identification and realization of potential cooperation and a joint response to climate risks? How can losses from climate change be minimized and possible benefits resulting from it be leveraged? What shared position should the states take regarding the possible application of Article 6 of the Paris Agreement?


Moderator:
Ekaterina Salugina-Sorokovaya — First Vice President, Gazprombank

Panellists:
Alexey Vostokov — Chief Executive Officer, Polyus
Kan Zaw — Union Minister of Investment and Foreign Economic Relations of the Republic of the Union of Myanmar
Janesh Kain — Deputy Secretary-General, Secretariat of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization
Aisen Nikolaev — Head of Sakha Republic (Yakutia)
Alexey Overchuk — Deputy Prime Minister of the Russian Federation
Maksim Reshetnikov — Minister of Economic Development of the Russian Federation
Andrey Slepnev — Member of the Board, Minister in Charge of Trade, Eurasian Economic Commission
Bakhtiyer Khakimov — Special Representative of the President of the Russian Federation for Shanghai Cooperation Organisation Affairs
Grace Hui — Chief Executive Officer, Net Zero Asia

Front row participants:
Alexander Shenderyuk-Zhidkov — Senator of the Federation Council of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation
Aleksandr Shirov — Director, Head of the Analysis, Production Potential Forecasting and Cross industry Cooperation Lab, Institute of Economic Forecasting of the Russian Academy of Sciences

11.09.2023
15:00–16:30

Building B, level 6, conference hall 10

International Cooperation in a Changed World

Global Challenges of Green Agenda: Test of Resilience and a Catalyst for Cooperation between BRICS Countries


The global challenges of today pose a significant threat to the long-term prosperity of the BRICS countries. At the same time, BRICS alliance has significant resources and opportunities to solve climate problems, make a transition to a green economy, and overcome most urgent social challenges. The BRICS countries are among the five leading developing economies in the world. The total population of the BRICS states is 3.23 billion people, or more than 40% of the world's population. BRICS provides 31.5% of world GDP (PPP) and has already outgrown the G7 in this indicator. By 2030, the share of BRICS in the world trade is predicted to exceed the combined share of the US and European countries altogether, reaching 37%. In case of expansion of the grouping, the role of BRICS on the world stage will only increase. The motto of the 15th BRICS Summit held in Johannesburg on August 22-24 2023, "BRICS and Africa: partnership for mutually accelerated growth, sustainable development and inclusive multilateralism" sets a new vector of movement towards sustainable development of the member countries of BRICS which have huge resources and potential for exponential growth, but are facing global challenges such as various climate and social risks. Despite the fact that the transition to a more sustainable development model in the BRICS countries is a multidimensional task, there is already a tendency to accelerate this movement, both at the international and regional levels. What are the new climate challenges the BRICS countries will have to deal with? What steps are the BRICS countries taking to implement the energy transition and ensure economic sustainability? What can we learn from each other? How can the BRICS countries use new opportunities for cooperation in the field of green innovation and low-carbon development? What is the role of advanced technologies in social progress? How to use their transformative power for the benefit of society?


Moderator:
Alexander Vedyakhin — First Deputy Chairman of the Executive Board, Sberbank

Panellists:
Ilangovan Angaiah — Director, Consun Energy Solution Private Limited
Percy Morapedi Koji — Co-founder, President, Africa Economic Leadership Council (AELC)
Ettore Maria Lombardi — Professor of Private Law, School of Law of the University of Florence (UniFI)
Mauricio Antonio Lopes — Lead Scientist, The Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation "Embrapa"
Slauzy Zodwa Mogami — Founder, Chief Executive Officer, Chairperson, Ladies in the Frontline (LLOA)
Xiangyu Meng — Deputy Director, The Dongguan Innovation Center Carbon Neutrality Laboratory, Tsinghua University
Ilya Torosov — First Deputy Minister of Economic Development of the Russian Federation

11.09.2023
15:00–16:30

Building D, level 6, conference hall 20

International Cooperation in a Changed World

International Commercial Arbitration in Modern Conditions


Russia’s economic pivot towards the Asia-Pacific region in an effort to find improved balance in foreign trade has helped to expand economic ties between Russian enterprises and companies in this region. In turn, this requires an effective mechanism for resolving possible disputes in matters concerning foreign economic activity. Practice shows that the most common way to resolve such disputes is arbitration. What experience has been gained by the International Commercial Arbitration Court at the Russian Chamber of Commerce and Industry, which celebrated its 90th anniversary last year, as well as the arbitration institutions of the Asia-Pacific countries in resolving international commercial disputes? What are some of the most topical issues in terms of interaction and cooperation in the face of sanctions, as well as the use of Internet technologies for arbitration? What are some of the practices and advantages of resolving foreign economic disputes in the arbitration institutions of Russia, Mongolia, and China? What are some of the special aspects of dispute resolution in merchant shipping? What are the main goals of the UNCITRAL Regional Centre for Asia and the Pacific?


Moderator:
Sergey Katyrin — President, Chamber of Commerce and Industry of the Russian Federation

Panellists:
Anna Arkhipova — Acting Chairman, Maritime Arbitration Commission at the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of the Russian Federation
Chen Bo — Deputy Secretary-General, China Maritime Arbitration Commission (CMAC)
Ivan Zykin — Acting Chairman, International Commercial Arbitration Court at the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of the Russian Federation
Athita Komindr — Head, UNCITRAL Regional Centre for Asia and the Pacific Ocean
Dmitriy Podshibyakin — Director, Arbitration and Mediation Center of the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of the Russian Federation
Natalia Prisekina — Executive Secretary, Branch of the International Commercial Arbitration Court at the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of the Russian Federation in Vladivostok
Gu Yan — Vice President, China International Economic and Trade Arbitration Commission (CIETAC)

11.09.2023
15:00–16:30

Building D, level 5, conference hall 13

International Cooperation in a Changed World

Support and Development for SMEs: The Role of Media in Russia–Asia Economic Cooperation


Small and medium-sized businesses in Russia are steadily gaining momentum, and the rapidly increasing cash flow underscores the significance of this sector for the country's economy. The departure of foreign players has opened up vacant niches that can be effectively filled by both local small brands and brands from the Asia-Pacific region. The successful expansion of Russian brand products into Asian countries and the presence of Asian manufacturers in Russia will allow the formation of a new landscape for small and medium-sized businesses. However, the promotion of programmes supporting entrepreneurial initiatives and the media's role in disseminating knowledge and promoting new brands remain relevant. How are consumer markets developing? Which niches are available? What is the consumer demand? What legislative barriers and challenges exist for businesses entering the markets of Russia and Asian countries? What trade and investment support is available for small business development from governments? How can new brands be promoted? What effective tools exist to enhance consumer knowledge and loyalty?


Moderator:
Alina Efimova — Deputy General Director for Sales and Business Development, Gazprom Media Sales House

Panellists:
Igor Vetryuk
Zhou Liqun
Konstantin Mayor — General Director, Mayer Group
Vitaly Mankevich — President, Russian-Asian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs
Dmitry Mednikov — Managing Director, Russian Media Group
Mikhail Trufanov — General Director, XM-Digital

Front row participants:
Kirill Babaev — Director, Institute of China and Modern Asia of the Russian Academy of Sciences; Deputy Chairman of the Presidium, National BRICS Research Committee
Denis Bykov — Financial Director, Etazhi-Vladivostok
Valeriy Zhilin — Director for Marketing, Azbuka Mebeli

11.09.2023
15:00–16:30

Building D, level 6, conference hall 18

International Cooperation in a Changed World

Ensuring the Safe Movement of Capital


In the new geopolitical conditions, the Russian economy is undergoing a transformation. Business is in search of new ways to carry out foreign trade settlements and investments. Free movement of capital in the international space remains the ultimate goal of investors, which means that the main task is to ensure its safety. And here we need a set of measures aimed at eliminating international risks. How may we preserve the free movement of capital? How to ensure the safety and predictability of cross-border settlements? What effective mechanisms and instruments will protect investors from assuming excessive risk? What modern technologies are used by banks in the implementation of international projects? Which financial instruments may be in high demand and effective in these conditions?


Moderator:
Marina Belyakova — Partner, Tax, Law and Business Support Department, B1 Group

Panellists:
Alexey Guznov — Secretary of State – Deputy Chairman, The Central Bank of the Russian Federation (Bank of Russia)
Andrey Klepach — Chief Economist, VEB.RF
Oleg Melnikov — Executive Vice President, Head of Contracts Banking Support Department, Gazprombank
Mikhail Khardikov — Operations Director, En+ Group
Oleg Shibanov — Director of the Center for Macroeconomic Research, Sberbank

11.09.2023
15:00–16:30

Building A, level 3, conference hall 2

International Cooperation in a Changed World

Russia’s Islands: Unique Opportunities for Partnership


Island territories (Russky Island, the Kurils, and Bolshoi Ussuriysky) are important for the development of the Far East and Russia as a whole. Each territory is unique, with its own competitive advantages. Russky Island is about science, technology, and tourism. Far Eastern Federal University and the unique Primorsky Aquarium have already been built, RusHydro’s first engineering centre is now up and running, and construction wrapped up this year on a cultural and educational center. The ‘Russian’ innovative science and technology centre, a megascience research facility, and a Rosneft engineering centre are currently in the design stage. Plans are in the works for major tourist projects and the development of exhibition and business infrastructure to accommodate SAR residents. The Kurils are all about tourism and fish processing, and with approximately 20 hotel facilities located on the islands (Iturup, Kunashir, and Shikotan), more than 85,000 tourists visited in 2022. The outlook for eco and cruise tourism there is promising. Fish processing facilities are also actively being developed on the islands, with centers on Kunashir and Shikotan. Bolshoi Ussuriysky Island is really about transportation, logistics, and tourism. Consultations are being held with China on a unified development concept for the island to include the creation of a Bolshoi Ussuriysky international transportation corridor, a ‘Russia’ international tourist park, and a ‘Nature of Russia’ safari park. What can be done to ensure the speedy development of the islands? How can new projects be attracted to the island territories? What additional support measures are needed to attract investors? Will existing infrastructure be sufficient?


Moderator:
Valeria Plotnikova — Managing Partner, Strategy Partners

Panellists:
Maksim Baksheev — Executive Director, KVC
Sergey Bachin — General Director, Vasta Discovery
Anatoliy Bobrakov — Deputy Minister of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Mikhail Degtyarev — Governor of Khabarovsky Territory
Anton Zaytsev — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Sakhalin Region
Sergei Ivanov — Special Representative of the President of the Russian Federation on Environmental Protection, Ecology and Transport

Front row participants:
Yuriy Egorov — Director, Nevada-Far East
Dmitriy Nozhenko — Chairman of the Board of Directors, Avrora Group
Mikhail Palennyy — Beneficiary, Arkhstroy Group
Nikolay Stetsko — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Primorsky Territory

11.09.2023
17:15–18:45

Building B, level 6, conference hall 9

International Cooperation in a Changed World

Sanctions as an Opportunity for Development


Despite unprecedented pressure from sanctions, the Russian economy is adapting to the restrictions and is in fact demonstrating significant potential for sustainability and growth. In addition to the obvious negative ramifications, the tightening of sanctions could serve as an impetus to boost and develop domestic production, strengthen partnerships between business and science, and introduce innovative technologies to create high-tech products and develop human resources. The measures taken by the Russian government have helped to somewhat reduce the impact of sanctions, primarily because Russia is reorienting its partnerships towards countries in Asia, Africa, and South America. It is crucial for Russia to continue searching for new opportunities to intensify and diversify its economy and ensure its sustainable development despite the crisis and the actions of unfriendly states. In this regard, many questions still need to be answered. What opportunities are emerging for domestic producers as they grapple with sanctions? What sectors of the economy could become engines of economic growth? How effective are the state support measures that have already been taken, and what additional incentives can the government create for the domestic economy? Boosting confidence in the economy means stimulating economic cooperation and finding new areas for business and the state to collaborate while also building more mobile, efficient, and secure infrastructure for financial interaction. The methods and tools used to objectively assess the real impact of the sanctions on the economy as a whole, the functioning of individual industries, and the lives of Russian citizens are extremely important today. How can we properly assess the effectiveness and efficiency of the protectionist response measures that have been taken? What is the role and importance of science, innovation, and digital technologies in ensuring economic growth and improving efficiency at all levels of the Russian economy in the new realities?


Moderator:
Ivan Lobanov — Rector, Plekhanov Russian University of Economics

Panellists:
Kirill Bychkov — First Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)
Nikolay Volobuev
Dmitry Volvach — Deputy Minister of Economic Development of the Russian Federation
Konstantin Dolgov — Deputy Chairman of the Committee on Economic Policy of the Federation Council of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation
Galina Izotova — Acting Chairman, Accounts Chamber of the Russian Federation
Karin Kneissl — Head, Center G.O.R.K.I. (Geopolitical Observatory on Key Issues in Russia); Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Austria (2017–2019)
Denis Kravchenko — Deputy Chairman of the Committee of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation on Economic Policy
Evgeniy Popov — Deputy Chairman of the Committee of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation on Information Policy, Information Technologies and Communications; Anchor, Russia-1 Channel
Natalya Popova — First Deputy General Director, Innopraktika
Evgeniy Chekin — Chairman of the Government of of Kamchatka Territory
He Zhenwei — Chairman, China Overseas Development Association
Alexander Shokhin — President, Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs

Front row participants:
Dmitry Viktorov — Director, NPO Akonit
Artem Lukin — Chief Executive Officer, TECHNORED
Ildar Neverov — General Director, State Trust Arktikugol
Alexey Fedorov — "Quantum Information Technologies" Scientific Group Head, Russian Quantum Center; Head of the Laboratory of Quantum Information Technologies, MISIS University (online)

11.09.2023
17:15–18:45

Building A, level 3, conference hall 2

International Cooperation in a Changed World

Greater Eurasia: Drivers for the Formation of an Alternative International Monetary and Financial System


Amidst the backdrop of fundamental changes in the global economic architecture, Eurasian economies are exhibiting relative stability. Simultaneously, the factor of integration is assuming an increasingly significant stabilizing role, and integration associations are evolving into centres of economic power. According to numerous experts, it is Eurasia that has the potential to become a catalyst for fresh stimuli in economic growth, drawing upon its extensive scientific, technical, and production capabilities. This involves the advancement of IT, high technology, and resource infrastructure. The steady progress of Eurasia, serving the welfare of all inhabitants of the continent and economic entities, greatly hinges on the effective operation of a sustainable monetary and financial system. The current global trade and financial system fails to adhere to the principles of transparency, efficiency, fairness, and equity. The holders of reserve currencies exploit their monopoly position, extracting financial rents from other nations and employing their currencies as "financial weapons" through unilateral sanctions not sanctioned by the UN Security Council. At the same time, the creators of the world's reserve currencies are entering another phase of instability, escalating their debt burden beyond reasonable thresholds and resolving their issues at the cost of others. Russia, like a number of other countries in Greater Eurasia, is forced to switch to national currencies in trade. However, aspects such as pricing, insurance, and other crucial infrastructural components continue to be under the purview of the jurisdictions of the issuers of the world's reserve currencies. What could be the foundation for a more stable financial system, and is it feasible to construct it through an international treaty grounded in the principles of transparency, efficiency, fairness, and equity? What can Greater Eurasia offer to create a new monetary and financial architecture? What set of institutions, resources, and procedures are needed to launch such a system? What are the prospects for the establishment of a unified Eurasian exchange, payment, and settlement space? What opportunities for interaction exist between integration associations, the largest economies, and smaller economies of Eurasia? How can a "win-win" mode be ensured when initiating the system?


Moderator:
Alexey Bobrovsky — Economic Observer

Panellists:
Aleksandr Babakov — Deputy Chairman of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation
Wang Wen — Executive Dean, Chongyang Institute for Financial Studies, Renmin University of China (RDCY)
Sergey Glazyev — Member of the Board, Minister in Charge of Integration and Macroeconomics, Eurasian Economic Commission
Kan Zaw — Union Minister of Investment and Foreign Economic Relations of the Republic of the Union of Myanmar
Andrey Klepach — Chief Economist, VEB.RF
Oleg Solntsev — Deputy General Director, Head of Monetary Policy Analysis, Center for Macroeconomic Analysis and Short-term Forecasting
Sohail Khan — Deputy Secretary General, Secretariat of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (online)
Aleksandr Shirov — Director, Head of the Analysis, Production Potential Forecasting and Cross industry Cooperation Lab, Institute of Economic Forecasting of the Russian Academy of Sciences

Front row participants:
Oleg Noginskiy — Head of the Expert Group, Scientific Center for Eurasian Integration
Pepe Escobar — Economic and Geopolitical Analyst, Federative Republic of Brazil

11.09.2023
17:15–18:45

Building D, level 5, conference hall 13

International Cooperation in a Changed World

A New Political and Economic Model of the World


The pandemic, new conflicts, and long-term socio-economic trends are resulting in a new global outlook. The model of the new world is still multidirectional, filled with internal contradictions, instability, and immaturity, but it is radically different from the world of the late 20th to early 21st century. The geographical drivers of this new model include Pacific Asia, Eurasia, including Russia, and African countries. It is the responsibility of politicians and the academic community to understand this new world model. How distant they are in their assessments …


Moderator:
Artem Malgin — Vice-Rector for Development, Director of the MGIMO Development Program "Priority - 2030", MGIMO University

Panellists:
Kirill Babaev — Director, Institute of China and Modern Asia of the Russian Academy of Sciences; Deputy Chairman of the Presidium, National BRICS Research Committee
Pornchai Danvivathana — Secretary General, Asia Cooperation Dialogue (ACD)
Andrey Keller — Director of the Sociocenter - the Operator of the Program "Priority - 2030"
Sergey Krasilnikov — Vice President, Managing Director of the International Relations and Integration Directorate, Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs (RSPP)
Khamsen Sisavong — Vice President of Lao National Chamber of Commerce and Industry
Carlos Tabunda — Dean of the Faculty of International Relations, Director, Center for Russian Studies, New Era University
Ulugbek Khasanov — Head of the Department of International Relations, University of World Economy and Diplomacy

11.09.2023
17:15–18:45

Building D, level 6, conference hall 19

International Cooperation in a Changed World

Scientific Diplomacy in Asia: Constructive Cooperation


The current active expansion of Russia’s ties with the Global South and its most important region, Asia, requires the use of various forms, methods, and channels of interaction that aim to enhance their effectiveness. One of these channels is science diplomacy: a kind of public diplomacy that is part of international scientific cooperation and aims to solve problems that are common to mankind and establish cooperation between countries and peoples. Science is developing rapidly in modern Asia. The weight and influence of these countries in world politics is growing, as academic communities contribute more heavily to the establishment of an independent foreign policy in their states as well as the potential and activities of their science diplomacy. Can advanced scientific knowledge be developed without diplomacy, and is diplomacy effective without science? What can the scientific community do to unite humanity in overcoming the current global challenges? How does the experience that has been gained by countries and academic communities in Asian states showcase how science has helped shape an appropriate and effective foreign policy? What role can science diplomacy play in overcoming political, historical, cultural, ethnic, religious, and other contradictions in Asia and around the world? What are the opportunities and goals of science diplomacy in Russia’s interregional and border relations? What kind of international scientific organizations are needed to maximize the achievement of the goals of developing international scientific cooperation?


Moderators:
Mikhail Kuznetsov — Director, Eastern State Planning Center (FANU Vostokgosplan)
Viktor Larin — Vice Chairman, Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences

Panellists:
Xing Guangcheng — Director, Institute for Border Studies of China, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences
Andrey Denisov — First Deputy Chair of the Federation Council Committee on Foreign Affairs; Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
Yuriy Kulchin — Chairman, Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences
Vitaly Naumkin — Scientific Director, Institute of Oriental Studies of the Russian Academy of Sciences
Sergey Sanakoev — Deputy Chairman, Russian-Chinese Friendship Society; Deputy Chairman, Russian Part of the Business Council of the Far East of the Russian Federation and the North-East of the People's Republic of China; Member of the Russian International Affairs Council (RIAC)

Front row participant:
Evgeniy Rusetskiy — Head of Asia-Pacific Representative Office, International Congress of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs

12.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building B, level 6, conference hall 6

International Cooperation in a Changed World

EAEU and BRICS: Role in Shaping a New Multipolar World


Profound and fundamental changes are taking place in the global arena. More and more countries are in favour of building a new and fairer architecture of international relations. The key role in this process can be played by international associations, where progressive initiatives and projects to promote the development of economic relations take shape, in which all stakeholders have a voice. The Eurasian Economic Union is the world’s largest integration association in terms of the territory it covers. The Union is developing at pace, achieving high rates of industrial and agricultural production and establishing an open dialogue with its foreign partners. BRICS, as a unique format of inter-state cooperation, is of particular interest to rapidly developing economies. The share of GDP of the BRICS countries currently stands at 26 per cent, with purchasing power parity at 31.5 per cent, compared to 30 per cent for the G7 countries. More than 20 countries have expressed their desire to join BRICS, including Belarus and Kazakhstan, member states of the Eurasian Economic Union. There is a great scope for expanding cooperation between EAEU and BRICS countries both in Eurasia and globally. What mechanisms are needed to build EAEU–BRICS relations and facilitate the creation of a new multipolar order? How will combining the potential of the EAEU and BRICS contribute to the development of an independent infrastructure for the monetary and financial market? What is the role of the EAEU and BRICS development institutions in this process? What are the opportunities and preconditions for creating the transport and logistics framework of the macroregion through the development of the modern intermodal logistics solutions and transport corridors? What is the potential for cooperation in the digital economy and innovative technologies? Is business interested in creating joint projects in the EAEU and BRICS countries?


Moderator:
Ksenia Komissarova — Chief Editor, TV BRICS International Media Network

Panellists:
Sammy Kotwani — President, Indian Business Alliance (IBA)
Dmitry Krutoy — Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Ambassador of the Republic of Belarus to the Russian Federation
Mikhail Myasnikovich — Chairman of the Board, Eurasian Economic Commission
Alexey Overchuk — Deputy Prime Minister of the Russian Federation
Sergey Pavlov — First Deputy Managing Director, Russian Railways
Vladimir Padalko — Vice President, Chamber of Commerce and Industry of the Russian Federation

Front row participants:
Dmitry Volvach — Deputy Minister of Economic Development of the Russian Federation
Danil Ibraev — President, Kyrgyz Union of Manufactures and Entrepreneurs
Sergey Storchak — Senior Banker, VEB.RF
He Zhenwei — Chairman, China Overseas Development Association

13.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building B, level 6, conference hall 6

International Cooperation in a Changed World

A Global Alternative to Western Dominance: The Contours of the Future


The policy of dominance by the countries of the "collective West" presents unpromising scenarios for the future of the rest of the world. In the context of global confrontation, the West has shifted from promoting quasi-democratic models to openly imposing formats of dependent existence on individual countries and regions through alternative means. This involves either relinquishing sovereignty, erasing traditional values and cultural identity, gaining access to the exploitation of resources and labour, controlling media, education, and national security systems, or facing political and economic isolation through the use of systemic sanctions. The West's desire to dictate its rules to the world is further strengthened by the extensive manipulation of consciousness using digital technologies, social media, and mass culture. The primary target of this manipulation is the younger generation, who will play a crucial role in shaping the political, socio-economic, and cultural agendas in their respective countries in the near future. The propaganda of the West's neo-colonial attitudes, widespread distortion of information and historical facts, and the digital dominance of American Internet platforms are just a few of the challenges that Russia, China, countries in the Asia-Pacific region, BRICS, SCO, and the Global South – all those who reject externally imposed programmes for their own future – are currently confronting. What could be the contours of the emerging world order that would serve the interests of those who do not wish to submit to the will of the 'golden billion' and global elites? What is their undiscovered full potential? What can be done to counteract the inertia of globalization, which solely serves the interests of a group of countries at the expense of the rest of the world? What alternative development path can be offered to young people?


Moderator:
Roman Mironov — Senior Producer of the International Multimedia Press Center of the Rossiya Segodnya Media Group

Panellists:
Aleksandr Babakov — Deputy Chairman of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation
Andrey Denisov — First Deputy Chair of the Federation Council Committee on Foreign Affairs; Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
Alexander Dugin — Philosopher, Doctor of Political Sciences, Doctor of Sociological Sciences, Professor, Public Figure (online)
Maria Zakharova — Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary; Director, Department of Information and the Press, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation
Oleg Karpovich — Vice-Rector for Research, Diplomatic Academy of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation; Doctor of Law, Doctor of Political Science, Professor; Member of the Expert Council under the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation for Science and Higher Education
Karin Kneissl — Head, Center G.O.R.K.I. (Geopolitical Observatory on Key Issues in Russia); Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Austria (2017–2019)
Boris Korobets — Rector, Far Eastern Federal University; Scientist, Public Figure; Member of the Bureau of the Coordinating Council for Youth Affairs in the Scientific and Educational Spheres of the Council under the President of the Russian Federation for Science and Education; Head of the Department "Security in the Digital World" and Professor of the Department "Information Security", N.E. Bauman MSTU