07.09.2022
10:00–11:30

Building A, level 3, conference hall 2

Russia's Place in the World: Diamonds are Made under Pressure

Strategic Technology Alliances: A New Imperative for Business Cooperation in Eurasia


The depth and intensity of Russia’s business relations with partners in the East has grown significantly in recent months. If Russia’s strategy in the rapidly changing world is politically based on the BRICS and SCO, what might its economic and technological strategy be based on? Not only the political, but also the economic landscape of the world is changing right before our very eyes. The imperative for numerous countries of Greater Eurasia, as well as for Russia, is to build a common technological and economic space, where platform solutions can be created based on trust and mutual benefit that can compete with leading global corporations. What strategic high-tech alliances do Russia and its partners need? What needs to be done to make them a reality? Who can take the lead in creating them?


Moderator:
Andrey Bezrukov — President, Technological Sovereignty Exports Association; Professor, Department of Applied International Analysis, MGIMO University

Panellists:
Vadim Glushchenko — Director, Center for Global IT-Cooperation
Alexey Gruzdev — Deputy Minister of Industry and Trade of the Russian Federation
Andrey Davidyuk — Chairman of the Board of Directors, Motorica
Kirill Menshov — Senior Vice President for Information Technology, Rostelekom
Skannd Tyagi — Founder, Chief Executive Officer, Starshot Ventures (online)
Anna Sharipova — Managing Director for National Projects, Russian Technologies State Corporation

07.09.2022
10:00–11:30

Building A, level 3, conference hall 3

Financial Markets: What holds Value when there is a Loss of Confidence?

Russia's Financial Sector Transformation: Preliminary Results

In partnership with VTB Bank

The Russian financial sector was one of the first and hardest hit by the blow of large-scale sanctions. The primary objective now is to reorient the sector as quickly and efficiently as possible, taking into account the changing realities. This presents a serious challenge, as market participants will be required not only to jointly develop and implement new working principles, but also carry out an almost total rebuild of many elements of the domestic financial infrastructure that have been performing strongly. At the same time, it is vitally important that the conditions for both the long-term sustainable development of the sector itself, and the gradual implementation of an adaptive economy backed by a credit resource are put in place. Some degree of pain will of course be caused by any deep structural transformation to the Russian financial sector. Changes will inevitably be felt in legislation and the regulatory and oversight activities governing the sector, as well as the running of the stock market, activities in global markets, and mechanisms for interacting with clients. What are the initial results of the ongoing transformation? How can its success be evaluated during this process?


Moderator:
Alexandra Suvorova — Anchor, Russia 24 TV Channel

Panellists:
Nikolai Zhuravlev — Deputy Chairman of the Federation Council of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation
Andrey Kostin — President and Chairman of the Management Board, VTB Bank
Mikhail Oseevskiy — President, Rostelecom
Ilya Torosov — First Deputy Minister of Economic Development of the Russian Federation
Igor Shuvalov — Chairman, VEB.RF

07.09.2022
10:00–11:30

Building A, level 5, conference hall 4

The Global Division of Labour: From Old Connections to New

The Future of Industries: What to Buy and What to Produce? Shipbuilding


The development of the Far East as an industrial hub will make it possible to build and service ships and maritime equipment at enterprises located in the Far Eastern Federal District, including the Far Eastern Shipbuilding and Ship Repair Centre (Vladivostok), Zvezda Shipbuilding Complex (Bolshoy Kamen), Vostochnaya Verf (Vladivostok), Amur Shipbuilding Plant (Komsomolsk-on-Amur), Khabarovsk Shipbuilding Plant (Khabarovsk), Nakhodka Ship Repair Yard (Nakhodka), Livadiyskiy Ship Repair and Shipbuilding Plant (Nakhodka) and Northeastern Repair Centre (Vilyuchinsk). The current tasks in the sector include the construction of large-capacity vessels to sustain cargo traffic in the waters of the Northern Sea Route, and fishing and crab fishing vessels at the shipyards of the Far Eastern Federal District. What state support measures are needed to attract Russian and foreign investors? What steps should be taken to increase the production capacity of enterprises? How will the existing issues in securing the technological sovereignty of the shipbuilding industry be resolved?


Moderator:
Konstantin Dolgov — Deputy Chairman of the Committee on Economic Policy of the Federation Council of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation

Panellists:
Mikhail Degtyarev — Governor of Khabarovsky Territory
Viktor Evtukhov — State Secretary – Deputy Minister of Industry and Trade of the Russian Federation
Alexey Rakhmanov — Chairman of the Board, Chief Executive Officer, United Shipbuilding Corporation
Vyacheslav Ruksha — Deputy Director General – Director for the Northern Sea Route Directorate, State Atomic Energy Corporation ROSATOM

Front row participants:
Evgeniy Ditrikh — Chief Executive Officer, GTLK
Denis Kravchenko — Deputy Chairman of the Committee of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation on Economic Policy
Khasan Likhov — Deputy Head, Federal Agency for Fisheries (Rosrybolovstvo)
Sergey Tseluyko — Chief Executive Officer, "Zvezda" Shipbuilding Complex

07.09.2022
10:00–11:30

Building B, level 6, conference hall 6

Creating a New Quality of Life for People

Rental Housing – Development Opportunities

In partnership with DOM.RF

The development of the Far East not only requires investment, but also an influx of talented specialists from other regions of Russia. This cannot be accomplished without a modern and civilized rental market: corporate rentals for company employees, commercial rentals for those who want and are ready to rent housing on market terms, social rentals for the low-income bracket, student rentals for young people at university. Thanks to mass privatization, almost 90% of Russian families live in their own housing, while the rest rent. The rental market in Russia is mostly grey: citizens rent apartments from individuals, tenants’ rights are not protected by contracts, and the quality of the actual apartments also leaves much to be desired. The creation of a transparent rental market that meets the needs of the various groups of the population, with guarantees for everyone involved, is a key component of the housing policy both in Russia as a whole and in the Far Eastern Federal District in particular. What is needed to achieve this? What role does the government and its institutions play in developing such a market? What is needed to get business interested in building rental housing?


Moderator:
Maria Kudryavtseva — Anchor, Russia 24 TV Channel

Panellists:
Olga Batalina — First Deputy Minister of Labor and Social Protection of the Russian Federation
Sergey Komyshan — Member of the Board, Executive Director, SIBUR
Vladimir Koshelev — First Deputy Chairman of the Committee of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation for Construction, Housing and Communal Services
Veronika Minina — Vice-Rector, National Research University Higher School of Economics
Sergey Nosov — Governor of Magadan Region
Elvira Nurgalieva — First Deputy General Director for Social Development, Corporation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Ivan Polandov — PIK SZ
Veronica Janushkevich — Director for Rental Housing Development, DOM.RF

Front row participants:
Alexey Belik — Prime Minister of Sakhalin Region
Maxim Smirnov — Deputy Head, The Federal Service for State Registration, Cadastre and Cartography (Rosreestr)

07.09.2022
10:00–11:30

Building B, level 6, conference hall 7

The Global Division of Labour: From Old Connections to New

The Future of Industries: Where Are We Ahead, Where Are We Behind, and Why?


Amidst a fundamental transformation of the geopolitical and economic landscape, the task facing the Russian economy is unprecedented in its complexity and scale: the creation of an entirely new economic model to drive the country’s economic development. The model must deliver technological sovereignty, reduce dependence on imports of critical foreign products, and restore and redesign value chains in key sectors of the national economy. The sectors most dependent on imports of foreign raw materials and components today are mechanical engineering, electronics and the pharmaceutical industry. Catching up in terms of development and replenishing individuals links of production chains in turn looks like an ineffective strategy. What is needed is a fundamentally different approach that not only replaces technological solutions, but offers new ones developed through the integration of science and the real economy. In a manner that is analogous to the concept of the ‘social elevator’, the creation of ‘technological elevators’ could make it possible to advance not one but several niche technologies in tandem. Russia has colossal resource, technological and scientific potential, which has made it possible to achieve leadership in sectors such as energy, metallurgy, chemicals, forestry and agriculture. At the same time, accelerated technological development is required in priority sectors of the national economy like aviation, the automotive industry, shipbuilding, electronics and pharmaceuticals, which have been hindered in their advanced development by a lack of interconnectedness and interaction among domestic industries, as well as low levels of integration into global production chains. Russia now possesses all the necessary prerequisites for a transition to a new growth period. Clearly, realizing this goal will not be possible through state budgetary spending alone, and the Russian business community must be actively involved in the process. Overcoming the disparities in development in remote territories such as Siberia, the Arctic and the Far East, as well as creating new ‘enclaves’ of integrated economic development are also highly important factors in achieving sustainable economic growth. Will the key sectors that form the basis of society’s life-support system (the military-industrial complex, agribusiness, the fuel and energy sector, transport, telecommunications and healthcare) be able to fully transition to a policy of import independence? How can an effective system of business incentives be created in order to achieve large-scale import substitution? How can scientific research be integrated with the real economy? What should the system for managing the technological development of economic sectors look like, and to what extent is the experience of the USSR and other countries relevant here? How can remote regions (the Arctic, Siberia, the Far East) attract private investment for development?


Moderator:
Ivan Lobanov — Rector, Plekhanov Russian University of Economics

Panellists:
Nikolay Volobuev — Deputy General Director, Russian Technologies State Corporation
Alexey Kulapin — General Director, Russian Energy Agency (REA) of the Ministry of Energy of Russia
Denis Manturov — Deputy Prime Minister – Minister of Industry and Trade of the Russian Federation
Natalya Popova — First Deputy General Director, Innopraktika
Maxim Sokolov — President, AVTOVAZ
Oleg Khorokhordin — Head of the Altai Republic
Alexander Shokhin — President, Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs

Front row participants:
Konstantin Dolgov — Deputy Chairman of the Committee on Economic Policy of the Federation Council of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation
Yamil Quispe — Co-founder, Pacifica
Oksana Smirnova-Krell — Vice President for Ecosystem Technological Development, Sberbank
Alexey Fedorov — Head of "Quantum Information Technologies" Group, Russian Quantum Center (online)
Wang Qi — Director, Institute for China-Russia Strategic Cooperation, Tsinghua University (online)

07.09.2022
10:00–11:30

Building B, level 6, conference hall 8

The Global Division of Labour: From Old Connections to New

Asian Green Market Energy: Get Connected

In partnership with Gazprombank

Given the turbulence on energy markets, finding a balance between developing the climate agenda as part of a sustainable economy and a stable socioeconomic situation is a particularly acute issue. Asia-Pacific countries have traditionally tried to take a balanced approach to planning their energy transition and the harmonious distribution of investments between new and traditional industries. For most large Asian countries, green finance markets have already become an important vehicle for attracting investment. In particular, in 2021, the Asia-Pacific region became the fastest growing region in sales of green bonds, accounting for roughly 26% of the new global green debt. Recently, Asia-Pacific nations have been actively developing a brand-new segment – carbon markets. Emissions trading systems have emerged in South Korea, Japan, and China, with the Chinese system poised to become the largest in the world in the foreseeable future. Russia’s low-carbon development strategy also includes markets for green finance and carbon credits as key components of the country’s energy transition. How are these new markets developing in the Asia-Pacific region and what potential do Russian and Asian investors have for taking part in each other’s markets? What does Russia need to do in order to actively collaborate with its Asian partners and integrate into these growing Asia-Pacific markets?


Moderator:
Natalya Tretyak — First Vice President, Gazprombank

Panellists:
Vyacheslav Alenkov — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Sakhalin Region
Dmitry Vakhrukov — Deputy Minister of Economic Development of the Russian Federation
Victor Drozdov — Member of the Board, Polyus
Aleksey Kozlov — Member of the Management Board, Managing Director, SIBUR
Dmitry Pristanskov — State Secretary – Vice President for Relations with Authorities and Administration, Norilsk Nickel
Grace Hui — Honarary Adviser, Financial Reporting Council (online)
Terry Zhang — Head of Global Strategy and Business Management, Pengyuan International (online)

Front row participants:
Alexey Zhikharev — Director, Russia Renewable Energy Development Association; Partner, Vygon Consulting
Marina Slutskaya — Sustainability Director, DOM.RF Bank

07.09.2022
10:00–11:30

Building B, level 6, conference hall 9

The Global Division of Labour: From Old Connections to New

The Far East and the Arctic: A Territory of New Energy

In partnership with the State Atomic Energy Corporation Rosatom

Nuclear power engineering acts as the driver for development of macro-regions and offers implementation of small nuclear power plants (SNPPs); their construction will enable to ensure economic and technical feasibility of large-scale infrastructure projects, such as development of Kyuchus cluster of solid mineral deposits in the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) and power supply for Baimsky Ore Mining and Processing Plant. Implementation of SNPPs provides economically viable prices for the consumers estimated with due regard for the project life cycle as well as high quality of electric power. At present Rosatom State Corporation is a multi-specialty and reliable partner engaged in the projects for arrangement of wind farms on the island of Sakhalin, development of a hydrogen-powered train, disposal and pumping of carbon dioxide. The Far East and the Arctic Region have a great potential for achievement of the synergistic effect due to application of the SNPP power, wind and hydropower, development of environment-friendly hydrogen-powered transport and transport with the use of gas fuel, establishment and refurbishment of the transport infrastructure for the Northern Sea Route. Environment-friendly modern power engineering is based on the human-centered integrated approach focused on strategic development of the Far East and the Arctic Region over the coming decades. What are the needs for electric power in the Far East and the Arctic Region? How to ensure compliance with the sustainable development principles in power supply of large-scale infrastructure projects? What is the impact of new power engineering on the living standards of people and business efficiency?


Moderator:
Mikhail Bazhenov — Partner, Capital Projects & Infrastructure, Debt Advisory Leader, Technologies of Trust

Panellists:
Roman Berdnikov — First Deputy General Director, Member of the Management Board, RusHydro
Roman Kopin — Governor of Chukotka Autonomous Region
Dmitry Livanov — Rector, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology
Valery Limarenko — Governor of Sakhalin Region
Alexey Likhachev — Director General, State Atomic Energy Corporation ROSATOM
Aisen Nikolaev — Head of Sakha Republic (Yakutia)
Vladimir Solodov — Governor of Kamchatka Territory

07.09.2022
10:00–11:30

Building B, level 6, conference hall 10

Russia's Place in the World: Diamonds are Made under Pressure

Russian East 2.0. Regional Drivers of Digital Development in the New Reality


The digital future of Russia is inextricably linked with the successful digital development of the regions. The digital expanses of the Far East and Siberia are already developed territories with extensive infrastructure, their own IT ecosystems, and effective digital solutions that permeate and connect all spheres of life. In industry, the enterprises in these regions are actively substituting imports of software and switching to domestic analogues given the new realities. Public services are preparing to transition to the unified Gostech platform. These processes require greater human resources and the more active involvement of all participants in the digital system. What areas of digital development are the most promising in the regions of the Far East and Siberia? What industrial software are the leading enterprises in the regions using? Are the regions ready to transfer their services to Gostech? How actively are universities and research laboratories participating in projects for the digital transformation of the regions and what is their role? What additional measures to support the IT industry are being implemented in the regions?


Moderator:
Dmitry Chernyshenko — Deputy Prime Minister of the Russian Federation

Panellists:
Igor Kobzev — Governor of Irkutsk Region
Valery Limarenko — Governor of Sakhalin Region
Viktor Tomenko — Governor of Altai Territory
Andrey Travnikov — Governor of Novosibirsk Region
Sergey Tsivilev — Governor of Kemerovo Region – Kuzbass

Front row participant:
Aisen Nikolaev — Head of Sakha Republic (Yakutia)

07.09.2022
10:00–11:30

Building B, level 7, conference hall 11

Russia's Place in the World: Diamonds are Made under Pressure

Strong Business – Strong Russia


Since 2014, 22 advanced special economic zones have been created and remain active in the Far East, while the Free Port of Vladivostok incentive regime has been operating in 22 municipalities across five regions since 2015. In connection with the sanctions policy of unfriendly countries and the pivot East, cooperation with Asia-Pacific countries is taking centre stage. The Far East is becoming a ‘window into Asia’ and is a key region for the production and transportation of goods and services to friendly countries, as well as a platform for joint investment projects in border areas. Exceptional support measures for Russian and foreign investors are needed to create the most attractive conditions in the whole of Russia and bring new business to the macroregion. The current support measures are beginning to lose their uniqueness as other Russian regions are creating exceptional support measures, reducing the competitiveness of the Far Eastern regions. Further to this, founding and running a business in the Far East has always been much more expensive than in other Russian regions. Close cooperation between the state and business is necessary to identify the problems and find solutions. Business conditions must be more favourable than in the rest of Russia, with incentives for financing, unique regulatory conditions and investment protection in place if accelerated economic growth is to be achieved. How can preferential financing mechanisms for businesses be established? What can be done to attract foreign business? How can unique regulatory conditions for business be put in place?


Moderator:
Dmitry Butrin — Deputy Editor-in-Chief, Head of Economic Policy Section, Kommersant Publishing House

Panellists:
Yerkozha Akylbek — Chairman of the Board of Directors, Udokan Copper
Aleksandr Generalov — President, Arnika-Holding
Artem Dovlatov — Deputy Chairman, VEB.RF; General Director, VEB.DV
Aleksandr Isayevich — General Director – Chairman of the Management Board, Russian Small and Medium Business Corporation
Mikhail Karisalov — Chairman of the Management Board, Chief Executive Officer, SIBUR
Zhou Liqun — Chairman, Union of Chinese Entrepreneurs in Russia (online)
Anatoly Popov — Deputy Chairman of the Executive Board, Sberbank
Anna Tsivileva — Chairman of the Board of Directors, Kolmar Group
Alexey Chekunkov — Minister of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic

07.09.2022
10:00–11:30

Building B, level 7, conference hall 12

The Global Division of Labour: From Old Connections to New

Business Under Protection: Guarantees of Business Stability


Given the current situation, the only way to both preserve and develop domestic business is to improve the system that guarantees the sanctity of entrepreneurs’ rights and to expand the mechanisms for protecting Russian business. Among other things, in order to preserve, support and develop favorable conditions for entrepreneurial activity, the pressure put on business by law enforcement and controlling bodies must be alleviated. What additional measures should be taken to protect business’ rights in the current situation? What legal mechanisms are effective in the short and long term? What should be a modern national jurisdiction?


Moderator:
Vladimir Gruzdev — Chairman of the Board, Association of Lawyers of Russia

Panellists:
Elena Bezdenezhnykh — Vice President for Regional Policy and Government and Administration Relations, RUSAL
Alexey Guznov — Secretary of State – Deputy Chairman, The Central Bank of the Russian Federation (Bank of Russia)
Alexander Kalinin — President, All‑Russian Non‑Governmental Organization of Small and Medium‑Sized Businesses OPORA RUSSIA
Igor Krasnov — General Prosecutor of the Russian Federation
Tatyana Mineeva — Commissioner for Entrepreneurs' Rights Protection in Moscow
Zhang Mingqi — Vice-President, General Secretary, China Law Society (online)
Tatyana Moskalkova — High Commissioner for Human Rights in the Russian Federation
Svetlana Orlova — Auditor of Accounts Chamber of the Russian Federation
Maksim Reshetnikov — Minister of Economic Development of the Russian Federation

Front row participants:
Vadim Lobov — President, Synergy Corporation
Elina Sidorenko — General Director, Platform

07.09.2022
10:00–11:30

Building D, level 5, conference hall 14

Creating a New Quality of Life for People

Five Years of the Far Eastern Hectare: Entering the Agglomeration Phase


The Far Eastern Hectare programme has been an effective tool for active people and has provided them with an opportunity to create their own businesses in their native land. The five-year grace period has concluded for the first contracts for the free use of land plots. The next and key stage is for citizens to register ownership of their land or sign a long-term lease. The system whereby land plots are provided to citizens for free within a month with minimal administrative costs helps to eliminate administrative barriers and get people actively involved in the development of the region. Creating urban agglomerations is the next stage in the programme’s implementation. To date, priority agglomerations have been identified in the regions. Transport and energy infrastructure has already been built for more than 10 of them. People own land, but what’s next? What are the prospects for the programme’s development? What role do agglomerations play in the spatial development of territories? How should housing development be organized on the hectares? What other development prospects do suburban areas have? How will the programme develop going forward?


Moderator:
Kirill Bychkov — First Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

Panellists:
Irina Ilyina — Faculty of Urban and Regional Development, Institute for Regional Studies and Urban Planning, Higher School of Economics; Professor, Faculty of Urban and Regional Development, Vysokovsky Higher School of Urban Studies (online)
Sergey Karginov — First Deputy Chairman of the Committee of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation on Development of Far East and Arctic
Andrey Kutepov — Chairman of the Committee on Economic Policy, Federation Council of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation
Alexander Levintal — Managing Director for the Far East, DOM.RF
Alexander Puzanov — General Director, Foundation Institute for Urban Economics
Oleg Skufinskiy — Head, The Federal Service for State Registration, Cadastre and Cartography (Rosreestr)
Nikita Stasishin — Deputy Minister of Construction, Housing and Utilities of the Russian Federation
He Jie — Professor, Chengdu University of Technology (online)
Evgeniy Chekin — Chairman of the Government of of Kamchatka Territory
Marat Shamyunov — Deputy Minister of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic

Front row participants:
Natalia Bugaets — Participant of the Far Eastern Hectare Program
Abraham Kalugin — Participant of the Far Eastern Hectare Program; Chairman, Primorsky Regional Public Organization "Assistance in Relocation and Adaptation of Old Believers Compatriots"
Michil Kharbin — Participant of the Far Eastern Hectare Program

07.09.2022
10:00–11:30

Building D, level 5, conference hall 16

Financial Markets: What holds Value when there is a Loss of Confidence?

Your Money And/Or Your Life: The Lack of a Freedom of Choice


The current situation in the world has changed everything. The global economy is still panic braking like motorists who see an obstacle in front of them on the highway. Some of them have already driven right up on the obstacle and are pressing the brakes, while others are still cruising behind them without seeing the obstacle, but will soon have to slow down too. Factories are shutting down, supply chains are in tatters, and companies are experiencing such a shock that they cannot service loans and pay rent, as the risk of borrowers going bankrupt increases. Pessimism about future incomes is growing among the public and industries, and all social benchmarks are changing. The pre- and post-COVID worlds are two entirely different places, and perhaps there are now three different worlds after the start of Russia’s special military operation? On the other hand, though, we have been hearing about the injustices of the modern economy, humans’ attack on nature, the loss of morals, and other negative phenomena in our lives for so long that we almost always, or quite often, subconsciously hope that the emerging world will be better than the one we are leaving. The world, which until recently was not just a comfortable place to live, but also a fairly highly organized system, will never be the same as it once was. The world of the late 2020s will be very different from that of the late 2010s. It has already changed both mentally and materially. We can talk about the distant future for a long time and trust that biotechnologies will undoubtedly replace information technologies as the main driver of the economy: the former will be embodied in increasingly unique and expensive products, while the products of the latter will soon turn into a public good. It is clear that our society will become more atomized, and people will become more adapted to surviving alone. Trade will start becoming confined to regional associations, which will look more and more like separate large countries. A lot of other things will happen, but there is one thing that is clearly not going to happen: the complexity of human civilization will not wane. And we all have to make a difficult choice: our money or our life? In what direction will we develop and how? Where should we stop, where should we turn around, and where should we look back?


Moderator:
Sergey Rybakov — Chief of Staff to the Chairman, All-Russian Society for Nature Conservation (VOOP)

Panellists:
Boris Korobets — Acting Rector, Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU)
Maxim Safonov — Professor, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA)
Vyacheslav Fetisov — Deputy of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation; Goodwill Ambassador, The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP); Chairman, All-Russian Society of Nature Conservation

Front row participants:
Aleksandr Lila — Director, V.A. Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology
Yuliya Morozova — Deputy Chairman of the Government of Kamchatskiy Krai
Julia Morozova — General Director, Creative Production
Ekaterina Salugina-Sorokovaya — General Director, International and Comparative Law Research Center

07.09.2022
10:00–11:30

Building D, level 6, conference hall 17

Russia's Place in the World: Diamonds are Made under Pressure

Territories of Advanced Development in the Far East: Topical Issues of Improving Legislation


A regulatory framework has been created that allows for introducing new tools for the economic development of the Far East. A total of 68 new legislative acts have been adopted to implement and improve legislation on advanced development. Time does not stand still, and to be competitive, updates need to be made constantly. This is why there are already more than a dozen new legislative initiatives in the portfolio. The current tools that are being used for the accelerated development of the Far East region, such as advanced special economic zones and the Free Port of Vladivostok, are quite popular among investors: more than 2,700 investment projects are being implemented with overall investment of more than RUB 6.6 trillion. As part of the preferential regimes that have been created, residents are given tax, land, urban planning, and other preferences. Are the existing legislative standards on preferential regimes effective enough? What legal problems do preferential regime residents face most often? What additional support measures should be provided to businesses, especially small and medium-sized enterprises, to increase the investment appeal of the Far East? What is needed to develop and create new SMEs in the Far East? What legislative instruments can stimulate growth among small businesses?


Moderators:
Dmitry Boyarko — General Director, Eastern Aqua Paradise
Denis Gros — General Director, Operating Company of the Industrial Park Avangard; Chairman of the Board of the Union of Residents, Territory of Advanced Social and Economic Development

Panellists:
Pavel Volkov — State Secretary – Deputy Minister for the Development of the Russian Far East and the Arctic
Andrey Grachev — Vice President for Federal and Regional Programs, Norilsk Nickel
Vladimir Novikov — Member of the Board of Directors, General Director, VEB Engineering
Nikolay Kharitonov — Chairman of the Committee on the Development of the Far East and the Arctic, State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation

Front row participants:
Ivan Abramov — Deputy Chairman of the Committee on Economic Policy of the Federation Council of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation
Svetlana Volobueva — Deputy General Director, Sports Shooting Club Topgan
Ludmila Kuznetsova — Shareholder, Poultry Farm Komsomolskaya
Denis Stolypin — General Director, Integrated Logistics Systems
Виктор Усов — Adviser to the Vice President for State and Private Industrial Companies and International Cooperation, Russian Academy of Sciences

07.09.2022
10:00–11:30

Building D, level 6, conference hall 18

Russia's Place in the World: Diamonds are Made under Pressure

Eastern Dimension of International Cooperation in the Arctic


The Arctic has been and remains one of the most interesting international regions, both in terms of its constituent institutions as well as the nature of how countries collaborate within it. Up until early 2022, cooperation in the Far North seemed to be among the most stable forms of interaction in the world. But the current geopolitical trends pose a number of new challenges that have taken the importance of international cooperation in the Arctic to a new, even higher level and prompted the need to search for an optimal model of cooperation in the Arctic region. The current geopolitical situation highlights the importance of building flexible formats of interaction. The emergence on the world political map of a substantial number of centres of power that differ in terms of the extent of their information technologies as well as their military and economic potential has created additional demands for the leading players as regards maintaining sustainable ties, including in the Arctic region. One of the priorities of Russia’s chairmanship of the Arctic Council is socioeconomic development, which calls for intensifying economic cooperation, infrastructure development, and sustainable navigation in the waters of the Northern Sea Route, in particular through the exchange of experience and practices among Arctic and non-Arctic countries.


Moderator:
Anastasia Likhacheva — Dean of the Faculty of World Economy and World Politics, National Research University Higher School of Economics

Panellists:
Taisuke Abiru — Senior Research Fellow, Security Studies Program, Sasakawa Peace Foundation (online)
Jonathan Wood — Researcher, Stefansson Arctic Institute; Representative from National Committee of Iceland, Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS); Editor, Peer Reviewer, Nordicum Mediterraneum (online)
Wang Wen — Executive Dean, Chongyang Institute for Financial Studies, Renmin University of China (RDCY)
Glenn Diesen — Professor, Department of Business, History and Social Sciences, University of South-Eastern Norway
Nikolay Korchunov — Ambassador-at-Large of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation; Chair of the Senior Arctic Officials, Arctic Council (online)
Artem Lukin — Associate Professor of the Department of International Relations, Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU)
Hide Sakaguchi — President, Ocean Policy Research Institute, Sasakawa Peace Foundation
Satish Soni — Navy Officer of the Republic of India (1976–2016); Commander-in-Chief of Southern Naval Command and Eastern Naval Command of the Republic of India (2012–2016) (online)
B.K. Sharma — Director, United Service Institution of India (USI)

Front row participant:
Sakiko Hataya — Research Fellow, Ocean Policy Research Institute, Sasakawa Peace Foundation

07.09.2022
12:30–14:00

Building D, level 5, conference hall 14

Creating a New Quality of Life for People

Healthcare: Accessibility, Quality, Results


The peculiarities of the Far East, such as its large territory, low population density, extreme climatic conditions, high level of population concentrated in capital cities, remoteness of settlements, and limited transport accessibility, require special differentiated approaches. Problems such as the accessibility of primary healthcare, preventive measures, and consultative and diagnostic assistance in small settlements are particularly acute. This problem cannot be solved by simply building up medical infrastructure since the creation of a full-cycle regional healthcare system requires impressive resources (financial and human resources, expertise, and patient flows). Given that it would be inadvisable to create specialized medical organizations in each individual region due to the limited nature of all types of resources, there is a unique opportunity to unify such resources at the level of interregional medical centres in regions with a low population. This approach would make it possible to achieve the effect of improving the quality of specialized medical care and save money. How can the limited resources of the regional healthcare system be effectively utilized? How can we build an effective system of territorial planning in healthcare taking into account the territorial peculiarities of the Far East? What is the best way to attract human resources to regional medicine? What should the focuses be for improving the qualifications of specialists and the effectiveness of the HR policy in the healthcare system of the Far East?


Moderator:
Tigran Gevorkyan — Deputy Director for the Implementation of Federal Projects, N.N. Blokhin National Medical Research Center of Oncology of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation

Panellists:
Vladimir Aronchik — Director of Cooperation Programmes, Development and International Business Division,State Atomic Energy Corporation ROSATOM
Igor Kobzev — Governor of Irkutsk Region
Grigoriy Kuranov — Deputy Presidential Plenipotentiary Envoy to the Far Eastern Federal District of the Russian Federation
Olga Kurilova — Director of Representative Office, Agency for Strategic Initiatives in the Far Eastern Federal District
Grigoriy Smolyak — Director of the Social Development Department of the Far East and the Arctic, Ministry of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Victor Fisenko — First Deputy Minister of Health of the Russian Federation
Alexander Khasin — Chairman of the Board of Directors, Centre for Development of Nuclear Medicine of Ulan-Ude (online)
Anastasia Khudchenko — Deputy Head of Primorye Territory Administration, Ministry of Health of Primorye Territory
Anna Sharipova — Managing Director for National Projects, Russian Technologies State Corporation
Olga Eikhler — Head of the Department of Medical Support for Conversion and Extreme Work and Blood Service, Federal Medical-Biological Agency of the Russian Federation

Front row participants:
Dmitry Morozov — Director, Veltischev Research and Clinical Institute for Pediatrics of the Pirogov Russian National Research Medical University of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation (online)
Alexander Osipov — Governor of Trans-Baikal Territory

07.09.2022
12:30–14:00

Building B, level 7, conference hall 11

Creating a New Quality of Life for People

Sports in the Far East: Creating New Opportunities


The Olympic factor and the Far East’s hosting of the Russian national teams as they geared up for Tokyo 2020 has provided a boost to the development of sports infrastructure in the regions of the Far Eastern Federal District. Systematic work is underway to form a sports map for the Far East. Projects to build new sports training centres as well as sports and tourism clusters are in the works. In the new realities, the Far East is becoming a key centre for new formats of international cooperation in sports and other industries. How has the sports development programme of the Far Eastern Federal District taken this factor into account? How will the region maintain a balance for the entire palette of sports to ensure the highest achievements as well as support grassroots and student sports? In what types of sports will Russian national teams get new bases in the Far East? Where will sports clusters be created? How is business involved in developing the sports potential of the Far East?


Moderator:
Dmitry Guberniev — Advisor to the General Director, Rossiya 1 Сhannel; Сommentator, Match TV

Panellists:
Sergey Karyakin — Russian Chess Player, Chess Grandmaster; Member, Russian Public Chamber
Igor Levitin — Aide to the President of the Russian Federation
Oleg Matytsin — Minister of Sport of the Russian Federation
Svetlana Orlova — Auditor of Accounts Chamber of the Russian Federation
Dmitry Pristanskov — State Secretary – Vice President for Relations with Authorities and Administration, Norilsk Nickel
Dmitry Chernyshenko — Deputy Prime Minister of the Russian Federation
Sergey Shishkarev — Chairman of the Board of Directors, Delo Group of Companies; President, Russian Handball Federation

Front row participants:
Georgy Bryusov — Director, Centre for Athletic Training of Russian National Teams (CAT)
Boris Korobets — Acting Rector, Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU)
Aleksandra Lebedeva — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Kamchatka Territory
Irina Olkhovskaya — Chief Officer for Seaport and Railway Projects, UMMC

07.09.2022
12:30–14:00

Building B, level 6, conference hall 6

Russia's Place in the World: Diamonds are Made under Pressure

The Greater Eurasian Partnership: Pathways to Economic Development

In partnership with Russalt

The complicated geopolitical situation that has engulfed the world this year has created serious obstacles to building and developing various integration associations. The common economic space in Eurasia, whose establishment has also been significantly impacted by the sanctions policy, has not been immune to this either. What are the main problems and prospects for creating a common economic space in Greater Eurasia? Can complementarity and synergy be achieved in the development strategies of members of the Greater Eurasian Partnership? Does the formation of the Greater Eurasian Partnership have prospects in the foreseeable future based on the principle of the ‘integration of integrations’?


Moderator:
Mikhail Petrov — Deputy General Director, Russian News Agency TASS

Panellists:
Kirill Barsky — Acting Head of the Department of Diplomacy, Moscow State Institute of International Relations
Alexander Vedyakhin — First Deputy Chairman of the Executive Board, Sberbank
Dmitry Volvach — Deputy Minister of Economic Development of the Russian Federation (online)
Valentin Makarov — President, RUSSOFT Association
Maxim Protasov — Head, Russian Quality System (Roskachestvo) (online)
Andrey Slepnev — Member of the Board, Minister in Charge of Trade, Eurasian Economic Commission
Alexander Shokhin — President, Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs

07.09.2022
12:30–14:00

Building B, level 6, conference hall 7

Everyone has their Own Route: The Logistics of a Changed World

Far East Logistics: Seamless Technologies in Action

In partnership with FESCO

As sanctions persist, cargo traffic is rerouted from the North-Western regions of Russia to the Far East, thus the question of cutting-edge logistical technologies is more relevant than ever. Electronic paperwork, smart contracts, vessel capacity improvement through processing automation, digitalization of seaports and warehouses – all of this can improve the turnover capacities of the Far Eastern terminals in the short timeframe. The latter is a prerequisite for expanding the logistical attractivity of the region. Which digital logistical solutions are already in place in the Far East? Which international digitalization best practices can be implemented in Russia? Does Russia possess necessary IT resources? Does the state create barriers for going digital? Do state strategies for transportation and digital transformation need to be expedited?


Moderator:
Kirill Tokarev — Editor-in-Chief, Anchor, RBC

Panellists:
Yerkozha Akylbek — Chairman of the Board of Directors, Udokan Copper
Vladimir Ivin — Deputy Head, Federal Customs Service of the Russian Federation
Arkady Korostelev — President, Chairman of the Management Board, FESCO
Le Truong Son — President, Vietnam Businessmen's Association
Aleksey Shilo — Deputy Managing Director, Head, Centre for Corporate Transport Services (CFTO), Russian Railways

Front row participant:
Igor Milashevsky — Chief Executive Officer, GLONASS

07.09.2022
12:30–14:00

Building B, level 6, conference hall 8

Everyone has their Own Route: The Logistics of a Changed World

Aviation Accessibility of the Far East in Times of Global Turbulence


The changing conditions in Russia and around the world have resulted in new demands for aircraft operating in the Far East. Ensuring air accessibility in the Far East is the best way to accelerate the socioeconomic development and enhance the investment appeal of the region. In the current conditions, the issue of making flights more accessible in the Far East has taken on even greater importance. Federal budget subsidies are provided for the air transportation of passengers who officially reside in the Far East or are entitled to benefits. Flights are also subsidized for certain routes between the regions of the Far Eastern Federal District, with each region of the district co-financing air carriers’ expenses on operating flights on intercity routes. Unified Far Eastern Airline is successfully handling the tasks it has set. How can the positive dynamics that have been seen in domestic transportation be maintained? What can be done to address the limited transport accessibility and connectivity in the Far Eastern Federal District? What can Russian aviation industry propose to supply a unified Far Eastern carrier with aircrafts?


Moderator:
Ivan Pechorin — Managing Director, Far East and Arctic Development Corporation

Panellists:
Anatoliy Bobrakov — Deputy Minister of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Oleg Bocharov — Deputy Minister of Industry and Trade of the Russian Federation
Evgeniy Ditrikh — Chief Executive Officer, GTLK
Karin Kneissl — Federal Minister for Europe and International Affairs of the Republic of Austria (2017–2019)
Konstantin Sukhorebrik — General Director, Aurora Airlines
Alexey Tsydenov — Head of the Republic of Buryatia
Igor Chalik — Deputy Minister of Transport of the Russian Federation
Andrey Chikhanchin — First Deputy Chief Executive Officer for Commerce and Finance, Aeroflot

Front row participants:
Fedor Borisov — Chief Expert, Institute of Transport Economics and Transport Policy, National Research University Higher School of Economics
Anton Eremin — Deputy General Director, Siberia Airlines (S7 Airlines) (online)
Mikhail Kuznetsov — Director, Eastern State Planning Center (FANU Vostokgosplan)
Vyacheslav Loginov — First Deputy Chairman of the Committee on the Development of the Far East and the Arctic, State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation

07.09.2022
12:30–14:00

Building B, level 6, conference hall 9

The Global Division of Labour: From Old Connections to New

Climate Agenda: New Opportunities in the New Reality

In partnership with Udokan Copper

According to the Third Assessment Report of Roshydromet on climate change and its impacts for Russia, as well as latest surveys by Roshydromet and RAS institutes it is paramount for Russia to halt global warming at 2–2,50 C, in which case adaptation measures could counteract the negative effects. Similar conclusions are contained in the Sixth Assessment Report of the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, issued in 2021–2022. If global warming reaches 4–50 C Russia and the rest of the world can expect severe climate conditions. To exclude such a scenario, at the end of 2021 all major countries including Russia, China, and India declared their readiness to achieve carbon neutrality, a balance between greenhouse gas emissions and their absorption by terrestrial ecosystems, by 2060–2070. The long-haul movement is already underway in all major developing countries, including every G20 country. How to continue international cooperation and collaboration to resolve the global climate problem in a divided world? Most Russian companies that are major emitters of greenhouse gases are refocusing their marketing strategies on APAC markets. What are the challenges and opportunities in terms of carbon regulation that the turn to the East offers to companies?


Moderator:
Aleksey Kokorin — Climate Change Officer, World Wildlife Fund

Panellists:
Malik Mahmud Al-Haythar — Chairman of the Advisory Council to the Provincial Government of Ache (online)
Roman Berdnikov — First Deputy General Director, Member of the Management Board, RusHydro
Victor Drozdov — Member of the Board, Polyus
Milena Milich — Acting Minister of Ecology and Sustainable Development of the Sakhalin Region
Ekaterina Salugina-Sorokovaya — General Director, International and Comparative Law Research Center
Stephan Solzhenitsyn — Chief Executive Officer, SGK; Member of the Board of Directors, SUEK
Yuliya Shabala — Deputy Director General for Sustainable Development and Corporate Affairs, Udokan Copper
Andrey Sharonov — Chief Executive Officer, National ESG-Alliance
Mikhail Yulkin — General Director, CarbonLab (online)
Mikhail Yurchuk — Director for Interaction with Federal Authorities, Norilsk Nickel

Front row participants:
Aleksey Kaplun — Chief Executive Officer, H2 Clean Energy
Ivan Rubanov — Deputy Head of the Carbon Market and Innovation Projects Department, St. Petersburg International Commodity and Raw Materials Exchange

07.09.2022
12:30–14:00

Building B, level 6, conference hall 10

Creating a New Quality of Life for People

Far Eastern Federal District Construction Sector: A New Quality of Life


The construction industry is one of the most essential sectors of Russian economy and is vital for its growth. Industry participants in the Far Eastern Federal District face the task of advanced development, while exceeding the national average by key indicators. Like any macro-regional industry, it has its own advantages, pros and cons. Despite a huge resource endowment, access to widespread minerals is difficult. Some of the principal construction materials are not available in quantities needed to satisfy the production needs, while significant logistics expenditures affect the overall cost of construction. The industry suffers from a shortage of engineers, technicians, and workers. How to simplify access to common construction materials? What measures will allow the construction industry in the Far Eastern Federal District to grow at a faster pace than the national average? How to solve the personnel problem and build an effective system for training workers? What solutions are needed in the construction materials industry of the FEFD?


Moderator:
Maria Sinicic — Director of the Department for Integrated Development of Territories, Ministry of Construction, Housing and Communal Services of the Russian Federation

Panellists:
Gadzhimagomed Guseynov — First Deputy Minister of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Viktor Evtukhov — State Secretary – Deputy Minister of Industry and Trade of the Russian Federation
Vladimir Koshelev — First Deputy Chairman of the Committee of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation for Construction, Housing and Communal Services
Dmitriy Tetenkin — Deputy Minister of Natural Resources and Environment of the Russian Federation

07.09.2022
12:30–14:00

Building B, level 7, conference hall 12

Russia's Place in the World: Diamonds are Made under Pressure

Russian-Chinese Cooperation in a New Age


Despite a serious international turmoil caused by the coronavirus pandemic and the strengthening of sanctions, Russian-Chinese economic cooperation continues to grow steadily: between January and July 2022, trade turnover between Russia and China grew by 29% year-on-year, to USD 97.7 billion. The Russian Far East and China present tremendous development opportunities for each other, and joint work is already showing results: full-scale cooperation in the oil and gas sector, agriculture, and other areas is unfolding; the construction of cross-border infrastructure facilities connecting the two countries is advancing at an accelerated pace. In the current environment, industry associations both in Russia and in China are once again playing an important role as open platforms for serving the needs of Russian-Chinese trade and economic cooperation. They are guiding the process of forming new economic ties in the right direction, establishing a dialogue between the administration and business at both the regional and the state levels. At the same time, it is important to hear the real needs of the market and start searching for optimal solutions as soon as possible. Under the new economic order, Russian-Chinese trade and economic cooperation is facing unprecedented challenges, but its prospects are still broad, relying on traditional values of historical friendship and developed mutual trust. Russian-Chinese Friendship Society, which this year celebrates its 65th anniversary, plays an important role in maintaining this relationship. How should the central authorities, regional administrations, enterprises, and industry associations act? What should they do to stimulate mutually beneficial cooperation and joint development in order to achieve the goal of increasing trade turnover to USD 200 billion by 2024? How can they promote truly high-quality cooperation between the two countries? How to improve the investment climate and business conditions in the Far East as new logistical opportunities open up? How to strengthen cooperation in the agricultural sector and ensure food security for both countries in the strategic perspective? What are the bottlenecks in trade and economic cooperation and investment activities?


Moderators:
Zhou Liqun — Chairman, Union of Chinese Entrepreneurs in Russia (online)
Sergey Sanakoev — Deputy Chairman, Russian-Chinese Friendship Society; Deputy Chairman, The Russian Part of the Business Council of the Far East of the Russian Federation and the North-East of the People's Republic of China; Member of the Russian International Affairs Council (RIAC)

Panellists:
Oleg Belozerov — Chief Executive Officer – Chairman of the Executive Board, Russian Railways
Sun Guoqiang — President, Zhongding United Dairy Farming Co. Ltd. (online)
Alexey Dakhnovskiy — Trade Representative of the Russian Federation in the People's Republic of China (online)
Wang Ruibing — Chairman of the Board of Directors, SPIC Fund Management Company (online)
Eugeny Markin — Executive Director, Russian-Chinese Business Council
Vasily Orlov — Governor of Amur Region
Valeriya Repkova — Vice President, Region Group of Companies; General Director, Project Initiatives Development Agency
Zhao Xiaojia — General Director, KitayStroy
Zhang Hanhui — Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the People's Republic of China to the Russian Federation (online)
Nikolay Kharitonov — Chairman of the Committee on the Development of the Far East and the Arctic, State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation
Wang Jun — General Representative, Sinopec Russia and Central Asia
Ji Chunqin — Deputy General Manager, Zhongchengtong International Investment

Front row participant:
Pavel Kalmychek — Director for Bilateral Cooperation Development Department, Ministry of Economic Development of the Russian Federation

07.09.2022
12:30–14:00

Building D, level 5, conference hall 16

Financial Markets: What holds Value when there is a Loss of Confidence?

Crisis Management Portfolio for the Far East Regions and Regional Fiscal Sustainability


Russian regions have adopted a large package of regional anti-crisis measures to stabilize the socio-economic situation following the measures put in place at the federal level. At present, the anti-crisis portfolio differs by region depending on budgetary capacity, economic specialization (including at the level of the impact of sanctions on primary sectors) and other factors. Some of the anti-crisis measures, both federal and regional, are gaining significant traction, while others are in place more as a formality and many measures are assumed to be short-term. At the same time, the depth of impact of the sanctions on the regional economy and the stability of regional budgets will be different for federal subjects in the Far East, most of which are currently subsidized. Medium-term anti-crisis measures are therefore required. How have federal and regional support measures affected the economic and fiscal stability of federal subjects in the Far East? Which measures have proven to be the most popular and effective? How effectively are support measures penetrating into the real economy? Can strategic priorities be maintained within an anti-crisis framework? What risks do the medium-term effects of sanctions pose for regional budgetary systems? What measures taken at the federal level to stabilize regional budgetary systems have been the most effective? What measures should be taken in the medium term, taking into account the impact of sanctions?


Moderator:
Natalya Trunova — Auditor, Accounts Chamber of the Russian Federation

Panellists:
Sardana Avksentieva — Deputy Head of the Faction, "New People" Political Party
Anton Basansky — Deputy Chairman of the Committee of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Leonid Gornin — First Deputy Finance Minister of the Russian Federation (online)
Natalya Zubarevich — Professor of the Department of Economic and Social Geography of Russia, Faculty of Geography, Lomonosov Moscow State University (online)
Vladimir Klimanov — Director, Institute for Public Finance Reform (IPFR); Head of the Regional Policy Center, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA)
Alexander Osipov — Governor of Trans-Baikal Territory
Marat Shamyunov — Deputy Minister of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic

Front row participants:
Alexander Bardunaev — Chairman of the Committee on Budget, Taxes and Finance, People's Khural of the Republic of Buryatia
Evgeniy Chekin — Chairman of the Government of of Kamchatka Territory

07.09.2022
12:30–14:00

Building D, level 6, conference hall 17

Creating a New Quality of Life for People

Human Development in the Far East: The Key Asset Is People


Developing human capital is one of the main prerequisites for ensuring the socioeconomic development of the Far East. It is crucial to make an impact on the quantity and quality of human capital in the territory. Managing demographic and migration processes as well as risks creates conditions for the rapid socioeconomic development of the Far East. The labour market is experiencing new challenges due to the influence of internal and external factors and is imposing additional demands for the employment of the population, including the development of entrepreneurial skills. How can we preserve and attract human capital to the region? What are the demographic trends in the Far East region, and what impact are they having on ensuring stabilization in the population and creating conditions for growth? How can we ensure employment for young professionals immediately after graduation and keep them in the region? How can we expand the expertise of residents of the Far East? How should the government promptly respond to changes on and the transformation of the labour market? Are there any best practices for improving the demographic situation and attracting managerial personnel to the Far East and the Arctic?


Moderator:
Oksana Kosachenko — President, Sistema Charitable Foundation

Panellists:
Olga Batalina — First Deputy Minister of Labor and Social Protection of the Russian Federation
Evgeny Grigoriev — Head of Yakutsk Urban Distrikt
Olga Dergunova — Deputy President and Chairman of the Management Board, VTB Bank
Mihail Krivopal — Vice-Rector for Additional Education, Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU)
Elvira Nurgalieva — First Deputy General Director for Social Development, Corporation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic

Front row participants:
Ivan Abramov — Deputy Chairman of the Committee on Economic Policy of the Federation Council of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation
Roman Baskin — Director, Corporate University of Russian Railways
Alexander Fedyakov — Director, "School 21"
Yulia Khanzhina — Deputy Director of the Direction "Young Professionals", Agency for Strategic Initiatives
Pyotr Chekordun — Director, Fund for Assistance to the Development of the North of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

07.09.2022
12:30–14:00

Building D, level 6, conference hall 18

Russia's Place in the World: Diamonds are Made under Pressure

The Global Impact of the Russian Arctic: Opportunities for South Asia


The growing geopolitical tensions between countries on the global political arena has prompted changes in the status of the Arctic region. Given the extent of global competition, countries are striving to implement a comprehensive security strategy that focuses on increasing their presence in different geographical and economic zones. The leading superpowers are attempting to build closer ties between countries within the framework of interregional cooperation. They emphasize a collaborative approach to cooperation in such areas as the economy, maintaining the international rule-based order, deterring potential rivals, developing trade relations, logistics, ensuring environmental prosperity, and risk management. For South Asia, the Arctic is a region that offers opportunities for research and resource policy. South Asia’s position and interests in this region raise many questions, but also underscore the importance of holding discussions at the international level in the new economic realities. What prospects exist for cooperation in the Arctic region? What new opportunities are being created for individual states that do not have direct access to the Arctic due to their vast distance from it?


Moderator:
Maxim Filimonov — Vice President for Government Relations, "Delo" Group of Companies

Panellists:
Datla Bala Venkatesh Varma — Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the Republic of India to the Russian Federation (2018–2021) (online)
Alexey Zakharov — Research Fellow, Institute of Oriental Studies of the Russian Academy of Sciences (online)
Nikolay Korchunov — Ambassador-at-Large of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation; Chair of the Senior Arctic Officials, Arctic Council (online)
Anastasia Likhacheva — Dean of the Faculty of World Economy and World Politics, National Research University Higher School of Economics
Artem Lukin — Associate Professor of the Department of International Relations, Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU)
Alexander Makarov — Director, Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (online)
K.M. Seethi — Professor, School of International Relations and Politics, Mahatma Gandhi University (online)
Satish Soni — Navy Officer of the Republic of India (1976–2016); Commander-in-Chief of Southern Naval Command and Eastern Naval Command of the Republic of India (2012–2016) (online)
B.K. Sharma — Director, United Service Institution of India (USI)

07.09.2022
12:30–14:00

Building D, level 6, conference hall 19

Creating a New Quality of Life for People

Age and Image as Part of Social Attitude Towards Culture and Traditions


What is age? Does it depend on appearance, social status, or life accomplishments? According to the WHO, in 1955 the average life expectancy in the world was only 48 years. In 1995, the number rose to 65. By 2030, the average life expectancy in Russia should be 78 years. Today, the concept of "age" has become a phantom. On one side are 20-year-old CEOs of large companies and 15-year-old Influencers, while on the other side are people mastering new professions at 60. Medicine, bioprosthetics, cosmetology and plastic surgery are rapidly developing. The popularity of healthy lifestyle is gaining momentum. The key events that define social age are now distributed throughout a person’s life in a completely different way compared to 20 years ago. However, there are still age stereotypes we can hardly get rid of as they have become entrenched in our consciousness. How much has the age "census" changed? Is it because we have learned to look good, and therefore the time has come to feel good about ourselves accordingly? Is this the reason that more and more attention is being paid to health in general and preventive medicine in particular? How are big companies (including cosmetic companies) encouraging this, what pitfalls are there in this regard? Is it possible to fight the latter on the state level? What is the threat of the mass fad for body positivity from the point of view of clinical medicine?


Panellists:
Julia Bordovskikh — Health Coach; Brand Creator, Vitamin L (online)
Dina Gayzatullina — Deputy General Director for Government Relations, Innotech Group of Companies
Zalina Gurieva — Founder, Bionika Preventive Medicine Clinic
Hovhannes Davidyan — Founder, General Director, Avicenna
Ruslan Dreval — Research Supervisor, Expert Healthcare (North-West, Siberia, and the Far East); Expert, Social Policy Committee of the Federation Council of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation
Elena Istyagina-Eliseeva — Director, State Museum of Sport; Deputy Chairman of the Commission on Physical Culture and Promotion of a Healthy Lifestyle, Public Chamber of the Russian Federation; Research Supervisor, Institute of Sports Management and Law, National Research University Higher School of Economics (online)
Ekaterina Odintsova — TV Presenter, Blogger (online)

Front row participant:
Alexandra Mukhotina — General Director, Medicine. Obstetrics. Gynaecology; Chief Physician, Primavera Centre for Endocrine Health and Reproduction;

07.09.2022
15:00–17:00

Building S, level 3, plenary session hall

Plenary session


Address by the President of the Russian Federation Vladimir Putin
Address by the Chairman of the State Administrative Council, Prime Minister of the Provisional Government, and Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces of Myanmar Min Aung Hlaing
Address by the Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan
Address by the Mongolian Prime Minister Luvsannamsrai Oyun-Erdene
Address by the Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress of China Li Zhanshu

Video addresses:
Narendra Modi, Prime Minister of the Republic of India
Ismail Sabri Yaakob, Prime Minister of Malaysia
Pham Minh Chinh, Prime Minister of Vietnam


Moderator:
Ilya Doronov — Managing Director, RBC