11.09.2023
09:00–10:30

Building A, level 5, conference hall 4

APEC Conference on Cooperation in Higher Education in Asia-Pacific Region

Education as Path to Self-realization: The Needs of the Future


The face of education continues to change rapidly. New technologies are opening up both opportunities for more effective learning and self-realization as well as challenges for specialists on the labour market. The changing needs of employers are forcing universities to adopt new educational models to provide students with all the necessary conditions to realize their potential. The APEC CCHE, which is traditionally held at the Far Eastern Federal University, has become a sustainable platform for discussing trends and challenges in the development of the regional academic and research community. It offers opportunities to find perspectives on the educational policies of APEC economies. Participants of the 12th APEC Conference are invited to discuss the future of cooperation in higher education in the Asia–Pacific region and beyond. What is the future of education in the "neural networks boom" era? What cutting-edge approaches to engaging industry representatives in the educational process should be utilized? What are the opportunities for personalizing education? How to identify challenges and predict the prospects for qualifications recognition in APEC?


Moderator:
Yevgeny Vlasov — Vice-Rector for International Relations, Far Eastern Federal University

Panellists:
Ganbold Baasanjav — Director, United Nations ESCAP East and North East Asia Office (video message)
Dmitry Birichevsky — Director of the Department of Economic Cooperation, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation
Nguyen Van Phuc — Deputy Minister of Education and Training of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam (video message)
Pornchai Danvivathana — Secretary General, Asia Cooperation Dialogue (ACD)
Boris Korobets
Yu Miaojie — Rector, Liaoning University
Olga Petrova — Deputy Minister of Science and Higher Education of the Russian Federation
Gao Xinbo — Rector, Chongqing University of Post and Telecommunications (CQUPT)
Rebecca Fatima Sta Maria — Executive Director, APEC Secretariat (video message)
Huai Jinpeng — Minister of Education of the People's Republic of China (video message)
Thomas Schneider — Executive Director, Association of Asia Pacific Universities (APRU) (online)

11.09.2023
09:25–18:15

Building A, level 4, VEB.RF

Invest Contact


Initiators of investment projects in Far Eastern cities will present their proposals to potential investors, experts, and lenders during the day. The day will feature projects from the Sakha Republic (Yakutia), the Jewish Autonomous Region, the Republic of Buryatia, the Sakhalin Region, the Primorsky Territory, the Magadan Region, the Kamchatskiy Krai, the Khabarovsky Krai, the Zabaykalsky Krai, and the Amur Region. What projects are prioritized for financing today? What do entrepreneurs and investors need to work effectively in the Far East?


Moderators:
Maria Morgun — Chief Editor, Live Planet TV; Anchor, Correspondent, Russian State Television and Radio Broadcasting Company
Kirill Tokarev — Editor-in-Chief, Anchor, RBC

Panellists:
Alexey Bakulin — Chief Executive Officer, Far East Autocluster
Rostislav Goldshtein — Governor of the Jewish Autonomous Region
Mikhail Degtyarev — Governor of Khabarovsky Territory
Valery Eremin — General Director, System Concessions
Evgeny Kogan — Professor, National Research University Higher School of Economics
Valery Limarenko — Governor of Sakhalin Region
Sergey Nosov — Governor of Magadan Region
Vasily Orlov — Governor of Amur Region
Alexander Osipov — Governor of Trans-Baikal Territory
Vladimir Solodov — Governor of Kamchatka Territory
Nikolay Stetsko — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Primorsky Territory

11.09.2023
10:00–11:30

Building B, level 7, conference hall 11

The Far East over the Past Decade: What has been a Success and What Remains to be Done?

Oil and Gas Refining: An Engine of Economic Growth


The Russian petrochemical industry had to grapple with a number of difficulties in 2022. There were predictions back in spring that the industry could face a deep crisis, however, it managed to persevere and even implement several key projects. The search for new sales markets in Asia, the optimization of delivery routes to this region due to the growing capacity of Russia’s eastern railway domain, active import substitution, and state support measures were all factors in restructuring the traditional export business model, which resulted in only a 3.2% reduction in petrochemical production, while exports declined by 25%. The petrochemical industry is projected to grow at a rate of more than 4% per year over the next 15 years, although the structure of oil consumption will change and the industry will continue to focus on the domestic market. At present, one of the main tasks in which it would make sense for the state to be involved is assistance in financing and accelerating the speed of approval procedures. How have various projects survived the first year of sanctions? What needs to be done to improve the competitiveness of the Russian petrochemical industry? How has the global crisis affected the international LNG market and how is the LNG market projected to develop over the next decade? What is the current status of technologies being replaced? What benefits can Russia offer to friendly countries?


Moderator:
Daria Kozlova — Head of Analytical, Russian Energy Agency of the Russian Federation

Panellists:
Darya Borisova — Member of the Board – Managing Director for Development and Innovations, SIBUR
Vitaly Korolev — Deputy Head, Federal Antimonopoly Service of the Russian Federation
Vitaly Markelov — Deputy Chairman of the Management Committee, Member of the Board of Directors, Gazprom
Andrey Nikipelov — Deputy General Director for Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Solutions, State Atomic Energy Corporation Rosatom
Denis Nozdrachev — General Director, InfraVEB
Evgeny Petrov — Head, Federal Agency for Subsoil Use
Mikhail Sutyaginskiy — Chairman of the Board of Directors, Titan Group of Companies

Front row participants:
Alexander Zakharov — General Director, United Oil and Gas Company
Stanislav Neverov — General Director, East Arctic Oil and Gas Corporation
Pavel Puzanov — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Amur Region

11.09.2023
10:00–11:30

Building A, level 3, conference hall 2

The Far East of the Future

National Spatial Data System: Promising Solutions in the Development of the Far Eastern Federal District


The Far East is a special territory with unique resource and economic potential, the development of which is a national priority for the entire 21st century. The most important thing for the development of the territory is the availability of complete and reliable information about it: the elimination of "white spots" on the map of Russia through the creation and operation of a unified system containing consolidated data on land, its location, features, boundaries, and real estate objects. Consolidated and up-to-date spatial data serve as the basis for the creation and functioning of investment portals and infrastructure projects planning. In addition, they provide reliability in protecting property rights, introducing new super-services for people and businesses, and accelerating the development of Russian regions. How will spatial data help in the development of the Far East? What new opportunities are opening up for people, business, and the state? What is the role of regional authorities in building the National Spatial Data System?


Moderator:
Denis Gros — Coordinator for the Far Eastern Federal District, All-Russian public organization "Business Russia"; Managing Partner, DA! Development

Panellists:
Vladislav Zhdanov — Director, Roskadastr
Anton Zaytsev — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Sakhalin Region
Vladimir Koshelev — First Deputy Chairman of the Committee of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation for Construction, Housing and Communal Services (video message)
Andrey Samokhin — Chief Executive Officer, VEB.RF
Oleg Skufinskiy — Head, The Federal Service for State Registration, Cadastre and Cartography (Rosreestr)
Suren Tovmasyan — Head, Cadastre Committee of the Republic of Armenia
Do Thi Thu Thuy — Deputy Head of the Organization and International Cooperation Directorate of the Department of Survey and Mapping, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam (online)
Wang Quan — Director General, Land Satellite Remote Sensing Application Center of the Ministry of Natural Resources of the People's Republic of China (online)

Front row participant:
Nadezda Kamynina — Rector, Moscow State University of Geodesy and Cartography

11.09.2023
10:00–11:30

Building B, level 6, conference hall 6

International Cooperation in a Changed World

Valdai Discussion Club Session

An Open Far East in the World Economy: Achievements and Future Plans


The modern era is characterized by an unprecedented increase in the scale and intensity of Russia's trade and economic ties with Asian countries. This process was catalyzed by the sharp deterioration of the international security situation in Europe. However, the main reason and guarantee of successful Russian-Asian interaction was the accumulated effect of Russia's "pivot to the East," a long-term state strategy for intensifying policy in the Asia-Pacific direction, developing political dialogue with countries of the region and mutual trade and investment. The Far East, a natural hub for including the entire Russian economy in the Asian system of international and economic relations, is at the centre of this policy, which Russia has been pursuing since the beginning of the last decade. Over the past years Russia has implemented a series of programmes to develop the Far East, Siberia and the Arctic, to make them more attractive for Russian and international investors, to create a modern transport and logistics system and to make the region generally connected to the European part of the country and its closest partners in the Asia-Pacific region. This is the foundation on which a fundamentally new, by historical standards, fullscale interaction between Russia and the global economy is being built, based on mutual openness, readiness to develop trade, technological exchange and rejection of politicization of economic relations. The aim of the expert discussion is to assess the achievements already made in this area, the real scale of Russia's increased involvement in the Asian economic environment, along with the new opportunities and development potential of Russia's regions.


Welcome Remark:
Andrey Bystritskiy — Сhairman of the Board of the Foundation for Development and Support of the Valdai Discussion Club

Moderator:
Timofei Bordachev

Panellists:
Anna Bessmertnaya — Chairman of the Commission on Foreign Economic Cooperation with Partners from China, Moscow Chamber of Commerce and Industry of the Russian Federation
Wang Wen — Executive Dean, Chongyang Institute for Financial Studies, Renmin University of China (RDCY)
Sergey Pavlov — First Deputy Managing Director, Russian Railways
Alexander Timchenko — Member of the Board of Directors, FESCO
Yury Trutnev — Deputy Prime Minister of the Russian Federation and Presidential Plenipotentiary Envoy to the Far Eastern Federal District (online)

11.09.2023
10:00–11:30

Building B, level 6, conference hall 7

Business Dialogue

Russia – ASEAN


2023 is the 5th anniversary of Russia’s Strategic Partnership with ASEAN. In the ongoing period of recovery following COVID and the transformation of the global economic system, Russia is particularly interested in creating additional incentives for deepening and diversifying trade and working together with the countries of the Association economically. Priorities include ensuring food and energy security, the closed-loop economy and environmental issues, economic digitalization, the development of smart cities, and increased cooperation in science and education. Russia’s Far Eastern regions have major competitive advantages in a wide range of industries and, by virtue of their geographical location, are able to convert the existing close cooperation with Southeast Asian countries into tangible economic, scientific and educational results. What are the challenges currently facing the development of trade and economic co-operation between Russia and ASEAN member countries? What mechanisms are best able to realize the existing potential of trade, economic and investment cooperation? What will relations between Russian and ASEAN member states look like in 2030? What sectors and projects in the Russian Far East are of the greatest interest to partners from ASEAN?


Moderator:
Ivan Polyakov — Chairman, Russia–ASEAN Business Council

Panellists:
Igor Bailen — Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the Republic of the Philippines to the Russian Federation
Denis Butsayev — General Director, Russian Environmental Operator Public Law Company
Nikolay Volobuev
Kan Zaw — Union Minister of Investment and Foreign Economic Relations of the Republic of the Union of Myanmar
Sergey Katyrin — President, Chamber of Commerce and Industry of the Russian Federation
Michael Lopez Rama — Mayor of the City of Cebu, Republic of the Philippines

11.09.2023
10:00–11:30

Building B, level 6, conference hall 8

Education and Upbringing as the Foundation of Independence

School Pupils and Students Standing Together with the Country


The education process is about teaching and, more importantly, raising. An effective model of education in schools and universities creates a harmoniously developed personality and instils a sense of belonging to the country that ensures stable socio-economic development. In this sense, patriotism is an important component of the spiritual wealth of a socially significant personality. For a deeper and more meaningful understanding of the issue at hand, we must answer some difficult questions. How can we instill in our youth a patriotic spirit and sense of responsibility for the development of their country? How should patriotic education be structured under the state system to remain an organic part of the life of society itself? What does patriotism mean to modern youth, and is it possible to teach the new generation to be patriotic? Is it possible to measure patriotism?


Moderator:
Boris Korobets

Panellists:
Alexander Bugaev — First Deputy Minister of Enlightenment of the Russian Federation
Grigoriy Kuranov — Deputy Presidential Plenipotentiary Envoy to the Far Eastern Federal District of the Russian Federation
Aleksandra Lebedeva — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Kamchatka Territory
Kazini Milarowell — Student, School of Arts and Humanities, Far Eastern Federal University
Vladimir Mikhalev — Student of the Oriental Institute – School of Regional and International Studies, Far Eastern Federal University
Olga Petrova — Deputy Minister of Science and Higher Education of the Russian Federation
Alexey Chekunkov — Minister of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic (online)

Front row participants:
Denis Burov — Rector, Admiral Nevelsky Maritime State University
Dmitry Guzhelya — Deputy General Director, ANO Russia – Land of Opportunity
Mikhail Paley — Chairman, All-Russian Movement "Inspirers"
Nataliya Pakholkova — First Deputy Minister of Tourism of the Sakhalin Region

11.09.2023
10:00–11:30

Building B, level 6, conference hall 9

The Logistics of Change

New Logistics in the Far East: The "White Swan" of the Russian Economy

In partnership with FESCO

The development of traditional and new maritime and intermodal freight transport routes through the Far East, the expansion of port infrastructure in this region are among the key priorities of the government agenda in the current geopolitical environment. Upgrading the infrastructure framework in the Far East creates new conditions for expanding the geography of transportation through this region and the growth of freight flows. For example, port capacity expansion projects are being implemented in the region today, and over the past year Russian operators have launched new logistics services from Vladivostok to China, Vietnam and other Southeast Asian countries. With the rapid growth of cargo volumes handled by Far East ports, the digitalization of logistics to reduce clearance time is coming to the forefront. The Russian Far East has significant potential in terms of the introduction of new digital platforms and technological solutions. How can we develop in the context of global digital transformation, and what are the challenges facing players in the Russian transportation and logistics market today, given the development of land and sea trade routes? Are additional technological solutions needed in the Far East in the conditions of growing freight traffic: infrastructure development projects, introduction of new digital services, etc.? How should Russia's transportation infrastructure develop for the purposes of implementing digital management principles in the transportation system? What government support measures are needed for the Russian transportation sector to accelerate the launch of new routes through the Far East and the development of ship repair and shipbuilding services in this region?


Moderator:
Alexandra Suvorova — Anchor, Russia 24 TV Channel

Panellists:
Oleg Belozerov — Chief Executive Officer – Chairman of the Executive Board, Russian Railways
Ruslan Davydov — Acting Head, Federal Customs Service of the Russian Federation
Ekaterina Lyakhova — Director for Business Development, The State Atomic Energy Corporation ROSATOM
Veronika Nikishina — General Director, Russian Export Center
Dmitry Pankov — General Director, Delo Management Company
Andrey Severilov — Chairman of the Board, FESCO
Mya Tun Oo — Deputy Prime Minister, Union Minister for Transport and Communications of the Republic of the Union of Myanmar
Yunlong Shang — Chairman, Heilongjiang Transportation Investment Group
Alexander Shokhin — President, Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs

Front row participants:
Dapeng Ji — General Director, Chery Commercial Vehicle Company
Fedor Kirsanov — General Director, Atlas Mining
Alexander Osipov — Governor of Trans-Baikal Territory
Aleksey Raikevich — General Director, GLONASS

11.09.2023
10:00–11:30

Building B, level 6, conference hall 10

International Cooperation in a Changed World

Chinese Business in Russia: Prospects for Further Growth


The last year and a half has accelerated the trends of changes in the economic landscape of Russia and its further focus on the leading Eastern economies, driven by the global macroeconomic adjustments of XXI century. Logistics chains are being reshaped, new production facilities are being created, and previously unknown brands are entering the everyday life of Russian citizens, forming radically new consumer habits and patterns. Important role in these process is played by Chinese enterprises, who are actively present in the Russian market. Having taken a leading position in such areas as commercial and light vehicles, telecom equipment and consumer electronics, should we say that Chinese businesses has already reached their peak in the Russian market, or are there even brighter prospects for them?


Moderator:
Alexey Maslov — Director, Institute of Asian and African Studies, Lomonosov Moscow State University

Panellists:
Dmitry Alexeev — General Director, DNS Group LLC
Alexander Vedyakhin — First Deputy Chairman of the Executive Board, Sberbank
Huang Guoliang — General Director, Huaxun Group Ru
Nikita Gusakov — Chief Executive Officer, EXIAR; Senior Vice President, Russian Export Center
Zhou Liqun
Song Liang — General Director, Gezhouba Russ
Alexander Osipov — Governor of Trans-Baikal Territory
Nikolay Stetsko — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Primorsky Territory
Ren Jianchao — General Director, Legendagro Holding
Li Enlin — Blogger

Front row participant:
Vladimir Zhuikov — Executive Director, Investment Department, Russian Direct Investment Fund

11.09.2023
10:00–11:30

Building D, level 5, conference hall 13

The Logistics of Change

Digital Solutions for Domestic and International Logistics


Transport and logistics companies have faced new challenges in recent times as logistics flows have been redistributed, new transport corridors have been created, and existing ones have been modernized. Moreover, there is now an even greater dependency on digital solutions, which optimize all links of the transport chain and are an integral tool for the logistics industry, particularly for companies that simultaneously use multiple modes of transport, such as sea, rail, and road. On the whole, digital solutions produce the best results in terms of the ratio of investments and the effect that is achieved. Such solutions include harmonizing multimodal electronic document management with partner countries, electronic navigation seals, and electronic queues at border crossings. These services enable companies to increase operational efficiency, and the state to control and manage supply chains, both domestically and abroad. How effective are digital services that ensure the seamless delivery of goods within a country and abroad? What are the prospects for developing electronic document management in the transport industry? What are some of the initial results of the electronic queue system? How effective has the experience of using electronic navigation seals been?


Moderator:
Polina Davidova — Director, Digital Transport and Logistics Association

Panellists:
Dmitriy Bakanov — Deputy Minister of Transport of the Russian Federation
Albert Liholet — Director General, Global Ports Management Company
Dmitry Surovets — Vice President for Information Technology, FESCO
Evgeny Charkin — Deputy Managing Director, Russian Railways
Artem Sheikin — Member of the Federation Council Committee of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation on Constitutional Legislation and State Building

11.09.2023
10:00–11:30

Building A, level 3, conference hall 3

International Cooperation in a Changed World

International Social Dialogue in the Digital Environment


Engagement with civil society is currently an effective tool for self-organization of citizens and non-profit organizations to promote democratic principles for the development of society, the peaceful resolution of conflicts, the improvement of the quality of life of the public, and mutual understanding between peoples. In 2021, the Civic Chamber of the Russian Federation was elected as Chair of the International Association of Economic and Social Councils and Similar Institutions, which aims to promote a dialogue based on the values of peace and security, human rights and democracy. The programme of Russia's chairmanship of the Association includes issues of digitalization of socio-economic relations that are relevant for the entire world community. This agenda is of great significance for the entire global community, which is experiencing a boom in digital technologies and their large-scale introduction into all aspects of social and economic life. What are the results of the chairmanship of the Civic Chamber of the Russian Federation in the International Association of Economic and Social Councils and Similar Institutions? How effective are Russian and foreign initiatives and projects in the field of introducing digital services, in particular, in organizing electronic voting? How would we assess the impact of dialogue between the government and society through public feedback on socially important issues? What aspects of the digital transformation of socio-economic relations could help us identify a common pathway for the development of the non-profit sector in Russia and friendly foreign countries as a counterweight to the imposed Western agenda?


Moderator:
Olga Golyshenkova — President, Association of Civilians and Organizations for Corporate Learning and Development MAKO

Panellists:
Oleg Artyugin — Executive Director, Head of the Centre for Development of Artificial Intelligence (AI) Technologies for the Social Good, Sberbank
Irina Bakhtina — Director of Sustainable Development, RUSAL
Andrey Bezrukov — President, Technological Sovereignty Exports Association; Professor, Department of Applied International Analysis, MGIMO University
Micheline Gbeha — Advisor, Economic and Social Council of the Republic of Benin (online)
Elena Martynova — Deputy Head,The Federal Service for State Registration, Cadastre and Cartography (Rosreestr)
Lidia Mikheeva — Secretary, Civic Chamber of the Russian Federation; Chairman of the Board, Research Centre of Private Law under the President of the Russian Federation (video message)
Igor Stolyarov — General Director, World Games of the Future; Head, Game of the Future 2024 Project
Zhang Yunyong — Member, Economic and Social Council of the People's Republic of China (online)

Front row participants:
Kseniya Kuznetsova — Acting Head of the Department of Infocommunication Technologies, National University of Science and Technology MISiS
Mikhail Kurakin — Deputy Editor-in-Chief, The International Affairs Magazine; Member of the Union of Journalists of Russia

11.09.2023
10:00–11:30

Building D, level 6, conference hall 20

Technological Development as a Guarantee of Sovereignty

Agro and Biotechnology: How to Feed 8 Billion People?


Agricultural biotechnology stands before the major challenge of improving food security for a growing global population. As it stands in 2023, there are more than 8 billion people on the planet, and the population continues to grow, making efficient, sustainable, affordable food production a must. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development expect food consumption to grow by 1.3% annually until 2032. Agricultural biotechnology’s main objectives include increasing plant yields and animal productivity and reducing product losses incurred during storage and transport. Agricultural production is increasing in the Far East every year along with processing volumes, and new storage facilities for agricultural produce are being created. In 2022, agricultural output in the Far Eastern Federal District totalled RUB 321.3 billion, a 21.6% increase over 2021. Even so, there is significant potential to increase production and processing of all types of agricultural products in the Far East even further. What must we do to realize the full potential of the agro-industrial complex in the Far East? What can the Far East contribute to global food security? How can we maintain a balance between self-sufficiency and export? What stands in the way of increasing exports of high value-added products? Is infrastructure in the Far Eastern Federal District ready for increased agro-industrial production and export?


Moderator:
Artem Belov — Director General, National Union of Milk Producers (Soyuzmoloko)

Panellists:
Anatoliy Bobrakov — Deputy Minister of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Stanislav Bogdanov — Director for Government Relations, X5 Group
Pavel Zarkov — Director of Investments and Development, Sodrugestvo Management Company
Denis Ilatovsky — Senior Vice President for Public Activities and GR, 'Delo' Management Company
Rustam Kamaletdinov — Director for Development and Interaction with Public Authorities, Molvest
Igor Moskovtsev — Chief Executive Officer, Korenovskiy Milk Processing Factory
Lyudmila Tekutyeva — General Director, Arnika
Nikolay Kharitonov — Chairman of the Committee on the Development of the Far East and the Arctic, State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation

Front row participants:
Olesya Kalashnikova — Director of Large Business Department, Russian Agricultural Bank
Vladimir Sitnov — Senior Vice President, Sberbank
Oleg Shenderyuk — Director, Yakov and Parters

11.09.2023
10:00–11:30

Building D, level 6, conference hall 17

The Far East of the Future

Financial Sustainability of Regions and Municipalities


At present, the role of the Far East in the socioeconomic development of the country is increasing. This means that new opportunities and prospects are opening up for the regions of the Far Eastern Federal District. Measures implemented at the federal and regional levels are aimed at the socioeconomic development of the macro-region, and their range and areas of focus are expanding, covering various spheres of the economy and social policy. Maintaining economic growth in the regions of the Far Eastern Federal District will eventually improve their financial stability. In this regard, the issue of how to boost the effectiveness of preferential regimes and other support measures for regional and municipal budgets becomes important. What mechanisms of advanced development have maximum potential in terms of the ultimate effects on the financial sustainability of regional and local budgets? The regions of the Far Eastern Federal District, which differ in terms of their financial situation and level of subsidy, face the task of improving their inhabitants’ quality of life. What approaches can be proposed to ensure the best possible exercise of regional and municipal powers? The system of inter-budget relations in Russia is in constant flux. In addition to the inter-budget transfers of recent years, the mechanism of budget credits has been developed significantly. Their use allows regions to finance a wide range of expenditure commitments, including those related to infrastructure development. What are the pros and cons of this mechanism? What other changes are required in inter-budget relations to improve the financial sustainability of the regions? The issues of ensuring the sustainability of regions and municipalities are relevant for many countries, while each country has its own methods for establishing and reforming inter-budget relations. What solutions from other countries with regards to stimulating mechanisms to develop individual territories and inter-budget relations can be used in the Russian Federation?


Moderator:
Natalya Trunova — Auditor, Accounts Chamber of the Russian Federation

Panellists:
Tatyana Gromova — Deputy Head, The Federal Service for State Registration, Cadastre and Cartography (Rosreestr) (online)
Vladimir Klimanov — Director, Institute for Public Finance Reform (IPFR); Head of the Regional Policy Center, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA)
Elvira Nurgalieva — Deputy Minister of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Valentina Pivnenko — Deputy Chairwoman of the Committee on Development of Far East and the Arctic of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation
Alexander Rolik — Chairman of the Legislative Assembly of the Primorsky Krai
Dmitry Tvardovsky — First Deputy General Director, InfraVEB
Evgeniy Chekin — Chairman of the Government of of Kamchatka Territory

11.09.2023
10:00–11:30

Building B, level 7, conference hall 12

The Logistics of Change

The Northern Sea Route for Global Growth


The Northern Sea Route is part of a new transport corridor benefiting the socio-economic development of the Arctic and Far East and the development of a new international route for the sustainability of global supply chains. More than 2.5 million people inhabit the Russian Arctic, and significant mineral resources are concentrated there. Backbone infrastructure is being established for this new global trade artery, the perfect logistical model linking the country’s East and West. We are talking about cabotage shipping and redirecting cargo flows from Arctic railways and rivers to sea transport in the waters of the NSR and international transit. The NSR ensures Russia’s Arctic and Far East remain connected to other countries, opens up opportunities for their integration into the world trade system, and increases the sustainability of regional and global supply chains. The swift development of the NSR places the issue of Arctic shipbuilding front and centre. In addition to icebreakers, the NSR will need dozens of new ice vessels of the highest class in the near future. These include tankers, bulk carriers, supply vessels, container ships, and port fleets. What logistical schemes for exporting cargo will the new geopolitical environment favor? What infrastructure needs to be created to ensure the NSR can operate sustainably as a national maritime transport corridor between the Far East and European Russia?


Moderator:
Mikhail Bazhenov — Partner, Capital Projects & Infrastructure, Debt Advisory Leader, Technologies of Trust

Panellists:
Evgeniy Ambrosov — Deputy Chairman of the Management Board, NOVATEK
Andrey Grachev — Vice President for Federal and Regional Programs, Norilsk Nickel
Gadzhimagomed Guseynov — First Deputy Minister of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Evgeniy Ditrikh — Chief Executive Officer, GTLK
Viktor Evtukhov — State Secretary – Deputy Minister of Industry and Trade of the Russian Federation
Sergei Ivanov — Special Representative of the President of the Russian Federation on Environmental Protection, Ecology and Transport
Arkady Korostelev — President, Chairman of the Management Board, FESCO
Vladimir Panov — Special Representative for the Development of the Arctic, State Atomic Energy Corporation ROSATOM
Sergey Frank — Chairman of the Council of Participants in Navigation on the NSR
Paul Fuhs — President Emeritus, Marine Exchange of Alaska (video message)
Ke Jin — Representative, NewNew Shipping Line

Front row participants:
Igor Borisevich — Deputy Head, Federal Medical-Biological Agency of the Russian Federation
Daniil Martynov — Advisor to the Minister of the Russian Federation for Civil Defence, Emergencies and Elimination of Consequences of Natural Disasters
Nikolay Shabalin — Executive Director, Marine Research Center at Moscow State University (MRC LMSU)

11.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building A, level 3, conference hall 2

The Far East over the Past Decade: What has been a Success and What Remains to be Done?

The Far East: The Path to Waste Recycling and a Circular Economy

In partnership with PLC «Russian Environmental Operator»

According to the World Bank, a little over 2 billion tonnes of municipal solid waste (MSW) are produced annually. By 2050, this is expected to grow by 1.5 times – up to 3.4 billion tonnes. Russians contribute 50–60 million tonnes to this amount every year. In the last 10 years, the volume of waste has more than doubled in Russia, with an additional 0.4 million hectares of waste per year. Internal threats to environmental safety have made it necessary to develop a new model of production and consumption – a circular economy, including the transformation of the current waste management system as a priority condition for sustainable development in the country. What has already been done and what remains to be done to create an effective solid waste management system and a circular economy in the Far East? What can the government offer to hedge investor risks? What is the role of extended producer responsibility in waste management? Economics and the environment: how can we create a safe infrastructure to safeguard the natural ecosystems of the Far East? International cooperation: what experience has been gained in waste management and what can we learn from China and India? The digitalization of the solid waste management industry in the Far East and its contribution to strengthening Russia's technological sovereignty. What is the potential for and importance of introducing IT solutions into the region on the example of the APRO automated information system?


Moderator:
Kirill Tokarev — Editor-in-Chief, Anchor, RBC

Panellists:
Igor Bailen — Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the Republic of the Philippines to the Russian Federation
Denis Butsayev — General Director, Russian Environmental Operator Public Law Company
Vitaly Korolev — Deputy Head, Federal Antimonopoly Service of the Russian Federation
Sergey Kotlyarenko — Chairman of the Board of Directors, Citymatic
Valery Limarenko — Governor of Sakhalin Region
Mikhail Chachin — Vice President, Sberbank

Front row participant:
Artem Sedov — General Director, The Big Three (Bolshaya Troyka)

11.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building B, level 6, conference hall 6

The Logistics of Change

The Challenges of the Eastern Branch Project: Accelerating Transnational Cooperation


The social and economic development of the Far Eastern Federal District and the everyday lives of all those living in the Far East are inextricably tied to the Eastern Polygon. Every new facility at the Eastern Polygon, just like every new measure taken to expand its carrying capacity, is an important step towards a more stable socio-economic situation in the regions of the Far East and all of Russia. However, the Eastern Polygon is already operating at maximum capacity. And Russia’s turn to the East, effective 2022, has aggravated the problem. According to experts, the turn has been taken. Increased load on the Far East’s primary transport artery is holding back the region’s development and keeping Russia from fully developing its trade and economic relations with other countries in the Asia-Pacific region. As such, further steps must be taken to address the Eastern Polygon’s infrastructural shortfalls. How and when should BAM and the Trans-Siberian be modernized? Which facilities are experiencing the most serious capacity constraints? Should private funds be brought into the Eastern polygon? What mechanisms can be used to attract investment?


Moderator:
Ruslan Baysarov — Chairman of the Board of Directors, Bamtonnelstroy-Most; Co-Chairman of the Board of Trustees, All-Russian Public Organization "Bamovskoye Commonwealth"

Panellists:
Pavel Brusser — First Vice President, Gazprombank
Mikhail Degtyarev — Governor of Khabarovsky Territory
Artem Dovlatov — Deputy Chairman, VEB.RF
Valentin Ivanov — Deputy Minister of Transport of the Russian Federation
Andrey Makarov — Deputy General Director, Russian Railways
Irina Olkhovskaya — General Director, Universal Logistics
Sergey Shishkarev — Chairman of the Board of Directors, Delo Group of Companies; Chairman of the Supreme Council, Handball Federation of Russia

Front row participant:
Olga Kharlamova — Vice President – Director of Key Accounts Department, Sberbank

11.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building B, level 6, conference hall 9

The Logistics of Change

‘Eurasian Agroexpress’: New Opportunities for Trade in the Asia-Pacific Region


The topic of food security and continuous supply chains is moving to the forefront of the global agenda, affecting a wide range of issues of social and political stability and the maintenance of living standards, primarily in developing countries. The EAEU offers comprehensive solutions factoring in across-the-board interests of producers and consumers, and stands ready to upscale them. The Eurasian Agroexpress project has demonstrated convincing results over a very short period, achieving targets set for 2024 in its very first year, transporting over half a million tonnes of agricultural products and food in 2022. Its range of partners is expanding, and the involvement of foreign states is growing, primarily in the Asia–Pacific Region and the North–South Corridor. In parallel, digital logistics technologies are developing, making transportation seamless and taking it to the highest level of competitiveness. Food security for countries. How is the balance between production in the EAEU and demand for agricultural products in foreign markets (China, Vietnam and other APR countries) taking shape? What infrastructure goals have been set within the Eurasian Agroexpress project? How is the transport and logistics and wholesale distribution infrastructure developing in the EAEU and Asia–Pacific Region, and what needs special attention? Introduction of modern international cargo handling standards. What are the features of digitalization, transparency, simplification and acceleration of freight transportation to ensure the proper level of control? How to reduce barriers, including administrative and commercial barriers, introduction of advanced technologies in cargo tracking? What are the benefits of moving to paperless multimodal freight? The need for and advantages of digital platforms for Eurasian Agroexpress participants. What steps need to be taken to increase agricultural exports in EAEU member states? What support measures are most in demand for agricultural producers, the development of transport corridors, and the expansion of access of goods to third country markets?


Moderator:
Andrey Slepnev — Member of the Board, Minister in Charge of Trade, Eurasian Economic Commission

Panellists:
Aleksey Gusev — Minister of Trade and Services of the Republic of Bashkortostan
Alevtina Kirillova — General Director, Eurasian Agrologistics (online)
Oleg Kobyakov — Director, Liaison Office with the Russian Federation, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)
Dmitry Murev — General Director, RZD Logistics
Veronika Nikishina — General Director, Russian Export Center
Vitaliy Sergeychuk — Member of the Management Board, VTB Bank
Mya Tun Oo — Deputy Prime Minister, Union Minister for Transport and Communications of the Republic of the Union of Myanmar
Artem Sharov — Chairman of the Board of Directors, Russian Trade Company (RTK) in China (online)

11.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building B, level 6, conference hall 8

Technological Development as a Guarantee of Sovereignty

Unmanned Systems: What Needs to Be Invented to Remove the Human from the Equation?


Global transformations of a political nature have created a new trend – Unmanned Systems. The introduction of unmanned systems will require the active development of normative standards and regulation of potential applications (aviation, motor transport, marine unmanned systems). Unmanned aerial systems are already hard at work in a number of industries (delivery, territorial monitoring, forest protection, and agriculture among others). Projects on unmanned motor transport and the use of drones in a marine environment are already underway. Expanding the application of unmanned systems throughout the economy would require that science, industry, and infrastructure be interconnected. Young scientists ready to fill the shoes of Korolev and Tsiolkovsky must step up if domestic unmanned systems are to have their breakthrough moment. It is the state’s job to bring together scientific developments and regulations to answer the following questions: Where should personnel receive training? How should science and technology centres be developed, and how can we measure demand and identify priority niches for domestically produced unmanned systems?


Moderator:
Pavel Golosov — Director, Institute of Social Sciences, Russian Academy of National Economy and Public Administration under the President of the Russian Federation (RANEPA)

Panellists:
Alexey Varyatchenko — General Director, BAS
Konstantin Dolgov — Deputy Chairman of the Committee on Economic Policy of the Federation Council of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation
Pavel Drogovoz — Vice-Rector for Science and Digital Development, Bauman Moscow State Technical University
Alexander Osadchuk — Head of the Main Department of Innovative Development, Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation
Dmitry Peskov — Head of Young Professionals Direction, Agency for Strategic Initiatives to Promote New Projects; General Director, Platform of the National Technology Initiative; Special Representative of the President of the Russian Federation on Digital and Technological Development
Vladimir Sivtsev — Minister of Transport of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

Front row participants:
Alexey Boreiko — Acting Director, Institute of Marine Technology Problems, Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences
Konstantin Gibalo — Venture Partner, Voskhod Venture Capital
Polina Davidova — Director, Digital Transport and Logistics Association
Denis Kravchenko — Deputy Chairman of the Committee of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation on Economic Policy
Maxim Kulinko — Deputy Director of the Directorate of the Northern Sea Route, State Atomic Energy Corporation Rosatom
Aleksey Raikevich — General Director, GLONASS
Oleg Shenderyuk — Director, Yakov and Parters

11.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building B, level 6, conference hall 10

Technological Development as a Guarantee of Sovereignty

AI: Evolution or a Threat to Humanity?


Over the past few years, AI technology has developed exponentially, and with it organizations and individuals have grown in their awareness of some of the ways AI-based solutions can be brought to bear. This technology can now be used to generate works of art – from text to music, increase process efficiency, capture patterns more accurately, and make predictions. At the same time, experts have begun to ring the warning bell concerning the ethics of artificial intelligence and possible dangers and call for a stop to systems training. The country and the world need an answer now more than ever to the question: is artificial intelligence evolution? Is it an opportunity or a threat to humanity? This session invites participants to engage artificial intelligence in a discussion on issues related to technological development and its impact on people.


Moderator:
Maхim Yeremenko — Vice President – Director of the Department for the Development of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning Technologies, Sberbank

Panellists:
Anatoliy Bobrakov — Deputy Minister of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Tigran Gevorkyan — Deputy Director for the Implementation of Federal Projects, N.N. Blokhin National Medical Research Center of Oncology of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation
Boris Korobets
Edward Maas — Head of Digital Laboratory, Gazprom-Media Holding
Elena Martynova — Deputy Head,The Federal Service for State Registration, Cadastre and Cartography (Rosreestr)
Anna Mesheryakova — Chief Executive Officer, Third Opinion Platform
Dmitry Pristanskov — State Secretary - Vice President, Norilsk Nickel

11.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building A, level 5, conference hall 4

The Far East over the Past Decade: What has been a Success and What Remains to be Done?

From Molecule to Product: The Development of Raw Material Deep Processing Chains

In partnership with SIBUR

The national programmes for the development of economic sectors being implemented in Russia, which include large-scale projects in housing and utilities, construction, the automotive industry and medicine, are significantly increasing the role of the country’s technological sovereignty in the field of polymer processing. Growth rates in the development of domestic polymer processing currently lag behind the pace of imports of finished products. The underutilization of processors’ capacity, excluding promising projects, stands at 24%, providing the potential for the additional production of high value-added products at the level of 690,000 tonnes per year. The market model, where demand determines supply, precludes the active development of technological sovereignty, and thus the technological leadership of the industry and country as a whole. The current drivers of growth are the import substitution of polymers and finished products, although this is a time-limited trend. A key condition for the progressive development of complete production chains from basic raw materials to final goods remains an effective combination of incentives at the level of the federal and regional authorities, including a focus on the creation of processing clusters. An additional growth point is the continued development of the use of solutions from recycled polymers with the potential for the production of over 1.5 million tonnes per year of end products in allied sectors. How can we move from simple import substitution to technological sovereignty in the production of polymer products? How can we realize Russia’s development potential in polymer processing? What role can the state play in the creation of processing clusters? How can we effectively stimulate the development of recycling and consumption of secondary polymers?


Moderator:
Yakov Sergienko — General Director, Yakov & Partners

Panellists:
Darya Borisova — Member of the Board – Managing Director for Development and Innovations, SIBUR
Lev Gorilovskiy — President, Polyplastic Group
Denis Deryushkin — Chief Executive Officer, National Hydrogen Union
Arthur Zhuravlev — Director of Development, EcoLab Technology
Pavel Sorokin — First Deputy Minister of Energy of the Russian Federation

11.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building B, level 7, conference hall 12

The Far East over the Past Decade: What has been a Success and What Remains to be Done?

Energy for Growth


The Russian Far East is home to some of the largest oil and gas fields. It’s also home to two major refineries, one in Khabarovsk and the other in Komsomolsk. LNG is produced and exported. Coal is mined in the region. New HPPs and NPPs are being considered for construction. Electricity consumption has always grown significantly faster in the Far East than the rest of Russia. The Far Eastern Federal District is approximately 40% of our country, meaning energy facilities are located far from one another. How can we see to it that every part of the fuel and energy complex is working for development? What problems need to be resolved for development to happen? What investments will be needed as a result? How can we increase export potential? What experience can we take from our foreign colleagues, and what can we share in return? And how should we set up work in a region with such difficult prevailing weather conditions?


Moderator:
Alexandra Suvorova — Anchor, Russia 24 TV Channel

Panellists:
Pavel Barilo — Executive Director, Siberian Generation Company
Chen Guoping — Executive Vice President, State Grid Corporation of China
Kirill Komarov — First Deputy General Director, Director of the Development and International Business Unit, State Atomic Energy Corporation ROSATOM
Vitaly Markelov — Deputy Chairman of the Management Committee, Member of the Board of Directors, Gazprom
Fedor Opadchy — Chairman of the Board, System Operator of the United Power System
Andrey Ryumin — General Director, Chairman of the Management Board, Rosseti
Mikhail Khardikov — Operations Director, En+ Group
Nikolay Shulginov — Minister of Energy of the Russian Federation

11.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building D, level 5, conference hall 13

The Far East of the Future

Supplying Small Businesses in the Far East Federal District with Specialists


The decline in the number of employees in all SME sectors has become a trend over the past year. For many small companies, the lack of staff is a constant and complex problem caused by various factors, such as demographics, lack of professional training or a shortage of the appropriate specialists, and competition for employees with the government and large businesses. These issues have now reached a critical point. The Far East is a dynamically developing macro-region, which requires a constant inflow of new labour, including from foreign countries. What issues do small companies in the Far East face? What is the role of staff availability in the development of SMEs in the Far East? What measures are being taken in the macro-region to support small businesses in addressing staffing problems? Are there opportunities for small businesses to become competitive in the labour market? What tools and programmes are available to small businesses to solve recruitment problems? What are the prospects for growth in the Far Eastern labour market, and how can this affect SMEs? What is the outlook for the development of Russia’s migration policy, and how might this affect the recruitment of foreign employees to small companies in the Far East?


Moderator:
Alexander Kalinin — President, All‑Russian Non‑Governmental Organization of Small and Medium‑Sized Businesses OPORA RUSSIA

Panellists:
Konstantin Basmanov — Vice-Chairman, Promsvyazbank
Igor Vetryuk — General Director, Wellway
Anton Zaytsev — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Sakhalin Region
Aleksandr Isayevich — General Director – Chairman of the Management Board, Russian Small and Medium Business Corporation
Alexey Maslov — Director, Institute of Asian and African Studies, Lomonosov Moscow State University

Front row participants:
Mihail Krivopal — Vice-Rector for Additional Education, Far Eastern Federal University
Sergey Nuzhdin — General Director, Regional Migrant Assistance Center ANO
Evgeniya Chavkina — General Director, Production company "Siberian Gubernia"

11.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building D, level 6, conference hall 18

Education and Upbringing as the Foundation of Independence

Protecting the Population at the Basis of Sociocultural Development in Russia


In an effort to solve demographic problems, the Russian government has adopted a number of measures, including a strategy for the period until 2050 to protect the population’s health. A key aspect of Russia’s policy is to have a social partnership in the implementation of public health and family well-being programmes in order to increase the population and people’s life expectancy. One important factor in protecting people’s health is the government sociocultural policy, which aims to boost the social status of large families in society, as well as the prestige of high moral standards in society. An equally important step in this regard is the government’s cooperation with traditional religions, non-profit organizations, and voluntary associations for the sake of strengthening the institution of the family and promoting the values of a moral and physically healthy lifestyle. How can public institutions, non-profit organizations, and the media consolidate their efforts to fulfil the government’s ambitious goal of protecting people’s health? How can we take an integrated approach to solving demographic problems by cultivating the institution of the family, motherhood, and health protection values? What communities and other tools will be fundamental for the development of today’s youth?


Moderator:
Anastasia Stolkova — First Deputy Chief Executive Officer for Development, Director of the Healthcare Directorate, Roscongress Foundation

Panellists:
Konstantin Abramov — General Director, All-Russian Public Opinion Research Center Foundation (VTsIOM); Chairman, Public Council under the Ministry of Labor and Social Protection of the Russian Federation
Maria Afonina
Anna Polezhaeva — Director, House of the Peoples of Russia
Natalya Popova — First Deputy General Director, Innopraktika
Sergey Rybalchenko — General Director, Scientific and Public Expert Evaluation Institute; Chair, Commission for Demography and the Protection of Family, Children, and Traditional Family Values, Public Chamber of the Russian Federation

Front row participants:
Irina Volynets — Commissioner for Children’s Rights in the Republic of Tatarstan
Anton Yaremchuk — Acting Deputy Governor of the Chukotka Autonomous Region

11.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building D, level 6, conference hall 20

The Far East over the Past Decade: What has been a Success and What Remains to be Done?

Russian Car Industry: In Search of a New Identity


In 2023, the Russian automotive market underwent significant changes. This transformation was mainly driven by the expansion of Chinese brands, the introduction of new Russian brands based on Chinese platforms, and the development of domestic capabilities. Nevertheless, achieving the strategic goals of the industry's growth will require answers to many new questions. How should cooperation between Russian automakers and companies from the Asia-Pacific Region be structured? What forms and requirements should underpin this collaboration? Which technologies and components should take precedence in the upcoming decade for development, import substitution, and localization? Where should the primary efforts in transportation be focused? Are there effective scenarios for establishing original Russian platforms, and what might be the cluster development policy across different regions of Russia, including the Far East?


Moderator:
Andrey Tomyshev — Partner, Advanced Manufacturing and Mobility Leader in Consulting, Technologies and Transactions, B1 Group

Panellists:
Sergey Gromak — Vice President for External Affairs and Shareholder Relations, AVTOVAZ
Zoya Kaika — Deputy Director General, SOLLERS (online)
Maxim Kalinkin — General Director, Gazprombank Leasing
Anatoly Kiyashko — Director for Interaction with Government Authorities and Corporate Partners, KAMA Automobile Company
Denis Nozdrachev — General Director, InfraVEB
Alexey Podshchekoldin — President, Russian Automobile Dealers Association (ROAD) (online)

11.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building B, level 7, conference hall 11

Education and Upbringing as the Foundation of Independence

There Is No Place Like Home. Appeal of the Regions for Young People


Youth is undoubtedly the future driver of successful socio-economic development of the region and country. Today, young people are tending to leave their home regions for big cities, with Moscow and St. Petersburg being the undisputed most popular destinations. Why do young people leave their home regions? What do young citizens need to return “home” and realize their potential in their native region? Can migration from the Far East be curtailed through housing subsidy projects for young people?


Moderator:
Mikhail Khomich — Managing Director for International Development, VEB.RF; Special Projects Director, Agency for Strategic Initiatives to Promote New Projects (ASI)

Panellists:
Aleksandr Vaino — Head of Youth Initiatives Center, Agency of Strategic Initiatives (ASI)
Elvira Nurgalieva — Deputy Minister of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Maksim Oreshkin — Aide to the President of the Russian Federation
Alexander Osipov — Governor of Trans-Baikal Territory
Vladimir Solodov — Governor of Kamchatka Territory
Nikita Stasishin — Deputy Minister of Construction, Housing and Utilities of the Russian Federation

11.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building B, level 6, conference hall 7

The Far East over the Past Decade: What has been a Success and What Remains to be Done?

Climate-related Business Objectives: The Limits of Possibilities

In partnership with Udokan Copper

Along with the new opportunities that arise for Russian companies as they turn to the East, they face a number of challenges related to the global disengagement and withdrawal of Western businesses from Russia. In today’s conditions, it is far more difficult to maintain the steps and efforts required to advance the climate agenda in Russia. Decarbonization can be continued together with new partners and with the help of new projects in the East and in the Asia–Pacific countries. Cooperation with China is becoming very promising. What challenges and opportunities from the point of view of carbon regulation does the turn to the East bring for companies? How will companies’ strategies alter due to the need to adapt to these changes today?


Moderator:
Andrey Sharonov — Chief Executive Officer, National ESG-Alliance

Panellists:
Irina Bakhtina — Director of Sustainable Development, RUSAL
Tatiana Zavyalova — Senior Vice President for ESG, Sberbank (online)
Igor Makarov — Head of the Laboratory for the Economics of Climate Change, National Research University Higher School of Economics (online)
Vadim Moskvichev — Director, Vanino Forestry Center
Elena Myakotnikova — Director of Climate Initiatives and Carbon Management, SIBUR
Ekaterina Salugina-Sorokovaya — First Vice President, Gazprombank
Ilya Torosov — First Deputy Minister of Economic Development of the Russian Federation
Yuliya Shabala — Deputy General Director for Sustainable Development and Corporate Affairs, Udokan Copper
Alexander Shokhin — President, Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs

Front row participant:
Alexey Zhikharev — Director, Russia Renewable Energy Development Association; Director, ENSOLVE

11.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building D, level 6, conference hall 19

The Far East over the Past Decade: What has been a Success and What Remains to be Done?

The Role of Closed Cities in Russia’s Long-Term Sustainable Development. Special Aspects of Developing Closed Cities


Closed cities are outposts for Russia in the literal and figurative sense. This is crucial to the country’s development, defence, and technological independence. Given their specific nature, closed cities have historically been home to people with unique expertise as well as intellectual and human capital. One of the top priorities for closed cities to develop and function has always been to provide the population with the proper level of support and social infrastructure. Greater social and infrastructural support for closed cities is not an end in itself, but a way to preserve and develop the high level of human and technological capital that has historically been accumulated in these unique cities. There are space cities. There are science cities. There are other centres of high technologies, military and civil. Their key focus is human potential. Russia is counting on them to regain its global scientific and technological leadership. Particular attention should be paid to strongholds in the Far East and the Arctic zone. The size of the population alone is not crucial in this case. Even small settlements or small towns can be of strategic importance for the country. How can we build a development strategy for closed cities and create the proper conditions for their long-term sustainable development as territories with significant state interests, while also ensuring the national security, technological leadership, and sovereignty of the Russian Federation?


Moderator:
Sergey Rybakov — Chief of Staff to the Chairman, All-Russian Society for Nature Conservation (VOOP)

Panellists:
Alexey Golubev — Advisor to the General Director, Rusatom Infrastructure Solutions, Rosatom State Corporation
Sergey Ermolenko — Chairman of the Board, ZATO Development Assistance Association (online)
Vladislav Kuznetsov — Acting Governor of the Chukotka Autonomous Region (online)
Olesya Nosova — Editor-in-Chief, General Director, Publishing House Komsomolskaya Pravda
Alexander Sergeev — Scientific Supervisor, National Center for Physics and Mathematics (NCFM)
Vyacheslav Fetisov — Deputy of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation; Goodwill Ambassador, The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP); Chairman, All-Russian Society of Nature Conservation (online)

11.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building A, level 3, conference hall 3

The Far East over the Past Decade: What has been a Success and What Remains to be Done?

Inbound Tourism: Challenges and Opportunities in a New Reality


Inbound Tourism: Challenges and Opportunities in a New Reality
In the years before the pandemic, Russia traditionally ranked as one of the world's most-visited countries, welcoming over 24 million foreign tourists annually and generating an annual income of USD 11 billion for its economy. The Far Eastern region played a significant role in the development of the inbound tourism economy, contributing up to 8% of foreign arrivals. This growth was primarily driven by tourists from Asia-Pacific countries, and it was undoubtedly facilitated by accessible transport links, simplified visa requirements, as well as the presence of unique natural and recreational resources. Having lost up to 80% of tourist traffic during the pandemic, the Far Eastern Federal District is gradually reaching pre-pandemic levels and setting ambitious goals of doubling tourist traffic to 7–8 million tourists by 2030. The region is making a significant effort to attract foreign tourists, aiming to achieve the necessary level of service, create universal year-round resorts, and develop various tourist formats – from beach and sports to ethnographic and gastronomic, as well as environmental and event tourism. Today, the development of inbound tourism is one of the strategic directions of state policy and one of the conditions for the advanced development and sustainability of the economy in Russia and the regions. What is needed for the capitalization of Russia's tourism potential, including the example of the Far East, our country's large tourist macro-region? What new opportunities exist for the development of inbound tourism in Russia in modern conditions? What support measures and incentives are required to increase the tourist flow to Russia? Which aspects of industry development, formats, and types of tourism should be focused on in the medium and long term? How can we maximize the economic and investment potential?


Moderator:
Aleksandr Sirchenko — Deputy General Director, Fun&Sun

Panellists:
Dmitriy Bakanov — Deputy Minister of Transport of the Russian Federation
Sun Guizhen — Secretary-General of the China Association of Travel Services (online)
Lu Yingchuan — Deputy Minister of Culture and Tourism of the People’s Republic of China (video message)
Arseny Krepsky — Head of the Primorsky Krai Tourism Agency
Thet Thet Khine — Union Minister of Hotels and Tourism of the Government of Republic of the Union of Myanmar
Michael Lopez Rama — Mayor of the City of Cebu, Republic of the Philippines
Maksim Reshetnikov — Minister of Economic Development of the Russian Federation
Ilya Umansky — President, Russian Union of Travel Industry; General Director, National tour operator “Alean”

Front row participants:
Александр Бардалеев — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Trans-Baikal Territory - Minister of Economic Development of the Trans-Baikal Territory
Aleksey Vasilchenko — General Director, Eastern Gates of the Country
Aleksey Geleta — Head of Digital Compliance Group, Analytical Center for the Government of the Russian Federation
Oxana Leonenko — General Manager of The Carlton Moscow
Tatyana Polovaikina — First Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Amur Region
Vladimir Rusanov — Minister of Tourism of Kamchatka Territory
Charlie Than — Union Minister of the Republic of Myanmar
Daw Than Than Swe — Governor, Central Bank of Myanmar
Timur Handy — Minister of Entrepreneurship, Trade and Tourism of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

11.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building D, level 5, conference hall 16

The Logistics of Change

Northern Delivery Management System: A New Reality


Exactly one year has passed since the announcement of the Northern Delivery concept. Over the past year, the bill has received all necessary approvals and considerations, and it was officially adopted on 4 August 2023. It will come into effect on 1 April 2024. This federal law is designed to enhance the reliability and timeliness of supply to the Far North and related territories. Most importantly, it will ensure the physical and price accessibility of imported goods for residents of the northern regions.
Based on the adopted law, a new system for managing northern imports will be created, which will include state and municipal support measures, the removal of infrastructure restrictions, and mechanisms to prevent shortages of essential goods. The central element of this system will be the federal state information system for monitoring northern deliveries. This system will ensure the processing and analysis of information regarding northern deliveries, monitor cargo movements, and promptly identify risks of supply disruptions.
What are the ways to increase the efficiency of northern deliveries: legal, transport and logistics, financial aspects, and digital tools? How will the roles and functionality of the authorities in the management of northern deliveries change? What challenges and goals does the new management system pose to the participants in northern delivery?


Moderator:
Mikhail Kuznetsov — Director, Eastern State Planning Center (FANU Vostokgosplan)

Panellists:
Kirill Bychkov — First Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)
Gadzhimagomed Guseynov — First Deputy Minister of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Grigory Ledkov
Yuliya Morozova — Deputy Chairman, Government of Kamchatskiy Krai
Nikolay Kharitonov — Chairman of the Committee on the Development of the Far East and the Arctic, State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation

Front row participants:
Nikolai Alexeev — General Director, Yakutopttorg
Vladimir Panov — Special Representative for the Development of the Arctic, State Atomic Energy Corporation ROSATOM
Aleksey Shilo — Deputy Managing Director, Head, Centre for Corporate Transport Services (CFTO), Russian Railways
Anton Yaremchuk — Acting Deputy Governor of the Chukotka Autonomous Region

11.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building D, level 6, conference hall 17

International Cooperation in a Changed World

The Cultural Code of Russian-Chinese Investment Cooperation


Despite sanctions pressure, Russian–Chinese cooperation is growing at a steady pace. Bilateral trade is set to comfortably exceed the psychological barrier of USD 200 billion in 2023. The presence of Chinese companies at the territory of the Russian Federation in the industrial, agricultural, construction, automotive and e-commerce industries is expanding. The number of bilateral projects in the humanitarian and cultural spheres is also increasing. China is becoming an important source of best practices in management and technological innovation. At the same time, we have to recognize the major barriers being faced by investment activity due to both the sanctions regime and the global economic crisis. What are successful and unsuccessful models of bilateral investment cooperation in industrial production, construction and culture? What are the best practices in company management?


Moderators:
Oleg Remyga — Orientalist, Expert, Russian-Chinese Business Council, Russian-Chinese Chamber
Cui Shan — President, Russian-Sino Foundation of Developing Culture and Art

Panellists:
German Maslov — Vice President of Liner and Logistic Division, FESCO
Dmitry Savenkov
Sergey Sanakoev — Deputy Chairman, Russian-Chinese Friendship Society; Deputy Chairman, Russian Part of the Business Council of the Far East of the Russian Federation and the North-East of the People's Republic of China; Member of the Russian International Affairs Council (RIAC)
Elena Stepanova — Associate Professor of the Department of International Management, Institute for Social Sciences, Russian Academy of National Economy and Public Administration under the President of the Russian Federation (RANEPA)
He Zhenwei — Chairman, China Overseas Development Association

11.09.2023
15:00–16:30

Building A, level 3, conference hall 3

International Cooperation in a Changed World

SCO and EAEU Climate Agenda: Moving Towards Common Goals

In partnership with Gazprombank

As the parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change prepare to come together for their Conference, the need has never been greater for communication between countries and, more broadly, blocs of countries on climate issues. It is important that the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation and the Eurasian Economic Union consolidate their positions, as the largest economies in Asia, on important issues of climate regulation, how carbon markets work, and the ambitious commitments made under the Paris Agreement.
Carbon regulation is moving forward in nearly every member of the SCO and EAEU, with each state approaching the task in the light of its own unique, strategically important goals. What unites them all, however, is a balanced approach to climate policy based on the latest scientific data. In Russia, expert decision-making is facilitated by an innovative project of the highest importance: the Unified National System for Monitoring of Climatically Active Substances.
While it is possible for an approach that prioritises national interests to be effective, such does nothing to eliminate risks for alliances with other countries. Mindful of this fact, the SCO and the EAEU have been proactive in adopting a number of programme documents to this end.
What should the SCO and the EAEU be cooperating on first and foremost within the climate agenda, and could it actually drive economic growth? What role should science and data from monitoring and forecasting play in the identification and realization of potential cooperation and a joint response to climate risks? How can losses from climate change be minimized and possible benefits resulting from it be leveraged? What shared position should the states take regarding the possible application of Article 6 of the Paris Agreement?


Moderator:
Ekaterina Salugina-Sorokovaya — First Vice President, Gazprombank

Panellists:
Alexey Vostokov — Chief Executive Officer, Polyus
Kan Zaw — Union Minister of Investment and Foreign Economic Relations of the Republic of the Union of Myanmar
Janesh Kain — Deputy Secretary-General, Secretariat of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (online)
Aisen Nikolaev — Head of Sakha Republic (Yakutia)
Alexey Overchuk — Deputy Prime Minister of the Russian Federation
Maksim Reshetnikov — Minister of Economic Development of the Russian Federation
Andrey Slepnev — Member of the Board, Minister in Charge of Trade, Eurasian Economic Commission
Bakhtiyer Khakimov — Special Representative of the President of the Russian Federation for Shanghai Cooperation Organisation Affairs (online)
Grace Hui — Chief Executive Officer, Net Zero Asia (online)

Front row participants:
Alexander Shenderyuk-Zhidkov — Senator of the Federation Council of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation
Aleksandr Shirov — Director, Head of the Analysis, Production Potential Forecasting and Cross industry Cooperation Lab, Institute of Economic Forecasting of the Russian Academy of Sciences

11.09.2023
15:00–16:30

Building A, level 5, conference hall 4

The Far East of the Future

What's Next? Assessing the Long-Term Impact of Government Projects in the Field of Youth Entrepreneurship


Any assessment of the effectiveness of youth entrepreneurship programmes requires a long-term evaluation of the impact on the lives of young people. Such an assessment will allow to analyse the changes that occur in youth entrepreneurial activity as a result of these projects. This should include an assessment of the impact of the projects on economic growth, employment, innovation activity and the social development of young people. By evaluating the long-term impact, the effectiveness of youth entrepreneurship policies and strategies can be ascertained. Many programmes have short-term objectives, so it can be difficult to measure the long-term impact of these programmes on youth entrepreneurship. For example, how long the legal entities that young people set up during the competition lasted, etc. The results of an analysis of the long-term impact of government projects would help to derive better methods and approaches that can be applied when designing future programmes. In order to effectively assess the long-term impact of a project, it is necessary to develop approaches and select the metrics that will be evaluated. What metrics should be monitored to assess the long-term impact of a programme? Are there legal restrictions to such an analysis? Who should analyse and process this data?


Moderator:
Oleg Shenderyuk — Director, Yakov and Parters

Panellists:
Alexey Agafonov — Deputy Director, Russia – Land of Opportunity
Aleksandr Vaino — Head of Youth Initiatives Center, Agency of Strategic Initiatives (ASI)
Vladimir Zhuikov — Executive Director, Investment Department, Russian Direct Investment Fund
Aleksandr Isayevich — General Director – Chairman of the Management Board, Russian Small and Medium Business Corporation
Yury Saprykin — Vice President for Regional and International Development, Skolkovo Foundation
Alexander Chernoshchekin — Head of the block of medium and small business, Promsvyazbank

Front row participant:
Sergey Mikhnevich — Executive Secretary, EAEU Business Council; Managing Director for International Multilateral Cooperation and Integration, Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs (RSPP)

11.09.2023
15:00–16:30

Building B, level 6, conference hall 8

The Far East of the Future

Sustainable Development of the State and Business: On Those who Look to the Future


Over the past thirty years, the relative birth level around the world has declined by almost 50%. This has led to profound disproportions in the age structure of the population, inevitable aging, and a higher social burden. The UN predicts that by the end of the century Russia’s population will decrease by almost a quarter, the population of Japan and China will decline by 50%, and India will start seeing negative trends in this regard. In these conditions, competition for labour will intensify for most Eurasian countries, including Russia. The only way to achieve sustainable improvements in the demographic situation is to increase the birth rate to a level that is higher than the population’s basic reproduction rate. This requires the state and business to consolidate their efforts. Since the corporate sector employs a large portion of the economically active population, the way in which employers treat family and demographic issues has a decisive impact on people’s sentiments about reproduction. In Russia, several companies are already showing their responsibility for the future of the country, region, and city in which they work, as well as their workforce. The government is ready to support responsible business. To this end, a project is being implemented to introduce a social rating of companies (EPS rating). The rating provides a universal assessment that aims to develop a business’s level of reliability, as well as social and environmental responsibility. In addition, Russia is currently developing a standard for the social capital of businesses based on the principles of responsible business. Do other countries have a social rating of companies and a standard for the social capital of businesses? What support measures could encourage businesses to invest in achieving Russia’s national development goals? How should the experience gained by business associations and leading companies as part of the ESG agenda be taken into account when implementing new initiatives?


Moderator:
Artur Niyazmetov — Deputy Presidential Plenipotentiary Envoy to the Central Federal District

Panellists:
Dmitry Alexeev — General Director, DNS Group LLC
Kirill Babaev — Director, Institute of China and Modern Asia of the Russian Academy of Sciences; Deputy Chairman of the Presidium, National BRICS Research Committee
Georgiy Belozerov — Chief Operating Officer, Agency for Strategic Initiatives to Promote New Projects
Dmitriy Zaytsev — Auditor, Accounts Chamber of the Russian Federation
Maxim Filimonov — Director of Corporate Communications and External Relations, TransContainer
Timur Shinaliev — Head of Special Projects Department, Federal Tax Service of Russia

Front row participants:
Vladimir Egorov — General Director, Trust Fund for Future Generations of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)
Marina Slutskaya — Director of the Sustainable Development and International Cooperation Unit, DOM.RF

11.09.2023
15:00–16:30

Building B, level 6, conference hall 9

The Far East of the Future

Building Bigger, Better, and More Beautiful


Providing people with high-quality, affordable housing is one of the state’s most important tasks. In 2022, the volume of housing construction in the Far East will reach a record 3.6 million square metres. In recent years, the rate of commissioning of new housing in the Far East has been ahead of the national average. But is this enough? Probably not. The level of housing provision in the macro-region is significantly lower, with an average of 35% less housing commissioned per 1,000 people. Given the fact that housing is one of the key factors of socioeconomic wellbeing, there is no time for procrastination. It is vital to formulate and implement breakthrough solutions, to continue work on reducing the investment and construction cycle and, taking into account the current realities, to fine-tune preferential mortgage lending programmes. Is the existing arsenal of support measures sufficient and how effectively is it used? Is it possible to show a significant breakthrough in the current market conditions? What are the main construction trends and how quickly is the Far East adapting to them?


Moderator:
Leonid Stavitsky — Honored Builder of the Russian Federation

Panellists:
Alexey Almazov — Managing Partner for the Regions Segment, FSK Group of Companies
Andrey Artamonov — General Director, DNS Development
Gadzhimagomed Guseynov — First Deputy Minister of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Evgeniy Kravchenko — Senior Managing Director, Director of Trade Finance Division, Sberbank
Valery Limarenko — Governor of Sakhalin Region
Vitaly Mutko — Chief Executive Officer, DOM.RF
Aleksandr Prygunkov — Chief Executive Officer, Samolet Strana
Nikita Stasishin — Deputy Minister of Construction, Housing and Utilities of the Russian Federation

Front row participants:
Ivan Abramov — First Deputy Chairman of the Committee on Economic Policy of the Federation Council of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation
Evgeny Grigoriev — Head of Yakutsk Urban Distrikt
Andrey Osipov — Member of the Board, Director of Business Development, Post Bank JSC
Aigul Yusupova — Managing Partner, Unikey

11.09.2023
15:00–16:30

Building B, level 6, conference hall 10

International Cooperation in a Changed World

Global Challenges of Green Agenda: Test of Resilience and a Catalyst for Cooperation between BRICS Countries


The global challenges of today pose a significant threat to the long-term prosperity of the BRICS countries. At the same time, BRICS alliance has significant resources and opportunities to solve climate problems, make a transition to a green economy, and overcome most urgent social challenges. The BRICS countries are among the five leading developing economies in the world. The total population of the BRICS states is 3.23 billion people, or more than 40% of the world's population. BRICS provides 31.5% of world GDP (PPP) and has already outgrown the G7 in this indicator. By 2030, the share of BRICS in the world trade is predicted to exceed the combined share of the US and European countries altogether, reaching 37%. In case of expansion of the grouping, the role of BRICS on the world stage will only increase. The motto of the 15th BRICS Summit held in Johannesburg on August 22-24 2023, "BRICS and Africa: partnership for mutually accelerated growth, sustainable development and inclusive multilateralism" sets a new vector of movement towards sustainable development of the member countries of BRICS which have huge resources and potential for exponential growth, but are facing global challenges such as various climate and social risks. Despite the fact that the transition to a more sustainable development model in the BRICS countries is a multidimensional task, there is already a tendency to accelerate this movement, both at the international and regional levels. What are the new climate challenges the BRICS countries will have to deal with? What steps are the BRICS countries taking to implement the energy transition and ensure economic sustainability? What can we learn from each other? How can the BRICS countries use new opportunities for cooperation in the field of green innovation and low-carbon development? What is the role of advanced technologies in social progress? How to use their transformative power for the benefit of society?


Moderator:
Alexander Vedyakhin — First Deputy Chairman of the Executive Board, Sberbank

Panellists:
Ilangovan Angaiah — Director, Consun Energy Solution Private Limited
Percy Morapedi Koji — Co-founder, President, Africa Economic Leadership Council (AELC)
Ettore Maria Lombardi — Professor of Private Law, School of Law of the University of Florence (UniFI)
Mauricio Antonio Lopes — Lead Scientist, The Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation "Embrapa" (online)
Slauzy Zodwa Mogami — Founder, Chief Executive Officer, Chairperson, Ladies in the Frontline (LLOA)
Xiangyu Meng — Deputy Director, The Dongguan Innovation Center Carbon Neutrality Laboratory, Tsinghua University
Ilya Torosov — First Deputy Minister of Economic Development of the Russian Federation

11.09.2023
15:00–16:30

Building B, level 7, conference hall 12

The Far East over the Past Decade: What has been a Success and What Remains to be Done?

The Evolution of Preferential Regimes in Russia


At the start of 2015, the development of preferential regimes in the Far East began: the Advanced Special Economic Zone (ASEZ) and the Free Port of Vladivostok (FPV) regime. Today, the Arctic Zone of the Russian Federation (AZRF), the Special Administrative Region on Russky Island (SAR), and the Kuril Islands of the Russian Federation (RKI) have been added. Amid a dynamically changing foreign policy and economic environment, business support mechanisms are being improved, new tools are being developed, and the conditions of existing preferences are being improved. These mechanisms should also be improved in terms of making them more client-centred and simplifying administrative procedures. The measures may boost the development of internal competition for investors. What are the best practices in investor support, including in the case of foreign territories? How can the Far Eastern Federal District provide the best conditions for doing business in Russia? What areas of support are the most effective and in demand among investors in today’s conditions? What changes to the existing preferential regimes should be made in the Far East?


Moderator:
Nikolay Zapryagaev — General Director, Corporation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic

Panellists:
Dmitry Vakhrukov — Deputy Minister Economic Development of the Russian Federation
Denis Gros — Coordinator for the Far Eastern Federal District, All-Russian public organization "Business Russia"; Managing Partner, DA! Development
Anastasia Permyakova — Deputy Head, Analytical Center under the Government of the Russian Federation; Member, Expert Council under the Government of the Russian Federation
Maria Perova — Director of the Department for Development of Priority Territories of the Far East and Arctic, Ministry of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and Arctic
Ivan Smirnov — Deputy Director General for Economics and Finance, Inter RAO - Management of Electric Power Plants
Natalya Trunova — Auditor, Accounts Chamber of the Russian Federation
Xue Hailong — Executive President, Xuan Yuan Industrial Development
Mikhail Khardikov — Operations Director, En+ Group
Nikolay Kharitonov — Chairman of the Committee on the Development of the Far East and the Arctic, State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation
Valery Tsivilev — General Director, Coal Mining Company “Kolmar”
Mikhail Yurchuk — Deputy CEO for Government Relations, Atlas Mining

11.09.2023
15:00–16:30

Building D, level 6, conference hall 20

International Cooperation in a Changed World

International Commercial Arbitration in Modern Conditions


Russia’s economic pivot towards the Asia-Pacific region in an effort to find improved balance in foreign trade has helped to expand economic ties between Russian enterprises and companies in this region. In turn, this requires an effective mechanism for resolving possible disputes in matters concerning foreign economic activity. Practice shows that the most common way to resolve such disputes is arbitration. What experience has been gained by the International Commercial Arbitration Court at the Russian Chamber of Commerce and Industry, which celebrated its 90th anniversary last year, as well as the arbitration institutions of the Asia-Pacific countries in resolving international commercial disputes? What are some of the most topical issues in terms of interaction and cooperation in the face of sanctions, as well as the use of Internet technologies for arbitration? What are some of the practices and advantages of resolving foreign economic disputes in the arbitration institutions of Russia, Mongolia, and China? What are some of the special aspects of dispute resolution in merchant shipping? What are the main goals of the UNCITRAL Regional Centre for Asia and the Pacific?


Moderator:
Sergey Katyrin — President, Chamber of Commerce and Industry of the Russian Federation

Panellists:
Anna Arkhipova — Acting Chairman, Maritime Arbitration Commission at the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of the Russian Federation (online)
Chen Bo — Deputy Secretary-General, China Maritime Arbitration Commission (CMAC)
Ivan Zykin — Acting Chairman, International Commercial Arbitration Court at the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of the Russian Federation
Athita Komindr — Head, UNCITRAL Regional Centre for Asia and the Pacific Ocean (video message)
Dmitriy Podshibyakin — Director, Arbitration and Mediation Center of the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of the Russian Federation
Natalia Prisekina — Executive Secretary, Branch of the International Commercial Arbitration Court at the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of the Russian Federation in Vladivostok
Gu Yan — Vice President, China International Economic and Trade Arbitration Commission (CIETAC) (video message)

11.09.2023
15:00–16:30

Building D, level 5, conference hall 16

The Far East over the Past Decade: What has been a Success and What Remains to be Done?

Protecting the Planet: The Role of the Far East


Developing the Far East is strategically important. The territory has enormous potential for economic growth and investment attraction. The Far East could become a pilot scheme for attracting ‘green’ and environmentally friendly investments. Two-thirds of Russia is covered by permafrost. Implementing projects in these conditions requires special consideration in the face of climate change. How is the Far East adapting to global climate change? How may we assess the situation and manage to adapt to the devastating consequences in time? How may we combine the efforts of business and government? Are the decisions taken sufficient? In the global climate change situation of 2021, Russia, China, and India declared their readiness to achieve carbon neutrality by 2060–2070. Carbon neutrality: a balance between greenhouse gas emissions and their absorption by land ecosystems. What measures are the governments and businesses of countries taking to address this issue? The Far East also plays an important role in preserving biodiversity and the ecological balance in the Asia–Pacific region. The region is actively implementing the Deep Clean federal project, which addresses the problem of recovering shipwrecks that have not been removed for a number of years. This will not only expand coastal space, but also transform the already picturesque landscapes of the Far Eastern ports. What has been accomplished? What plans does the region set itself?


Moderator:
Sergey Brilev — President, The Global Energy Association

Panellists:
Vyacheslav Alenkov — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Sakhalin Region
Sergey Anoprienko — Deputy Minister of Natural Resources and Environment of the Russian Federation
Roman Berdnikov — First Deputy General Director, Member of the Management Board, RusHydro
Andrey Grachev — Vice President for Federal and Regional Programs, Norilsk Nickel
Kirill Komarov — First Deputy General Director, Director of the Development and International Business Unit, State Atomic Energy Corporation ROSATOM
Vladimir Solodov — Governor of Kamchatka Territory

Front row participants:
Bogdan Bulychev — Traveler, Blogger, Producer
Kirill Bychkov — First Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)
Andrey Nagibin

11.09.2023
15:00–16:30

Building D, level 6, conference hall 19

Technological Development as a Guarantee of Sovereignty

The Global System of Drug Safety: Protecting Health in a Multipolar World


At present, several nations have significantly altered their approach to the value of human life and health, employing double standards. Never before, even in the context of world wars, has the provision of medicines to the populations of countries been placed under such critical conditions in terms of global drug policy. The global framework for drug availability has been shattered. This is a result of demands from political elites to halt cooperation and the supply of medicines from unfriendly states, transforming the refrain of 'keep medicine out of politics' into a tactic of 'medicine as a political tool.' Today, many countries have adopted new national strategies that prioritize drug safety and sovereignty. In the global system of drug safety and health protection within a multipolar world, it seems highly necessary to establish drug-sharing agreements among specific unions of states or individual large countries. These agreements would involve the mutual provision of medicines in the event of changes in the political situation. This is crucial because the primary responsibility of any state in varying geopolitical conditions is to safeguard the lives and health of its citizens. Within the framework of alliances with friendly states, the objective is to ensure drug safety at all stages of distribution. Such alliances are feasible with countries in Africa, the Asia-Pacific region, the Middle East, Southeast Asia, and the Eurasian Union. Is it possible to build a global system of drug safety? Should each country produce all medicines? How can we establish efficient logistics systems that can adapt to changing political situations? How can international collaborative research be sustained? What steps should be taken to foster effective relationships between government agencies in different countries, ensuring their operational functionality? What key aspects should be prioritized when harmonizing regulations concerning the movement of medicines across borders?


Moderator:
Aleksandr Petrov — Head of the Expert Council for Regulating the Circulation of Medicines and Medical Devices, Committee of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation on Health Protection

Panellists:
Tigran Gevorkyan — Deputy Director for the Implementation of Federal Projects, N.N. Blokhin National Medical Research Center of Oncology of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation
Alexander Demyanov — Member of the Board of Directors, Center for the Development of Advanced Technologies
Grigoriy Kuranov — Deputy Presidential Plenipotentiary Envoy to the Far Eastern Federal District of the Russian Federation
Aleksandr Turkov — Managing Director of the Investment Business Unit, VEB Infrastructure
Victor Fisenko — First Deputy Minister of Health of the Russian Federation

Front row participants:
Victor Dmitriev — General Manager, Association of Russian Pharmaceutical Manufacturers; Chairman of the Public Council under the Federal Service for Surveillance in Healthcare (online)
Kirill Kaem — Senior Vice-President for Innovations, Skolkovo Foundation
Alexandra Mukhotina — General Director, Medicine. Obstetrics. Gynaecology; Chief Physician, Primavera Centre for Endocrine Health and Reproduction;
Tadzio Schilling — Chief Executive Officer, Association of European Businesses (АЕВ)

11.09.2023
15:00–16:30

Building D, level 5, conference hall 13

International Cooperation in a Changed World

Support and Development for SMEs: The Role of Media in Russia–Asia Economic Cooperation


Small and medium-sized businesses in Russia are steadily gaining momentum, and the rapidly increasing cash flow underscores the significance of this sector for the country's economy. The departure of foreign players has opened up vacant niches that can be effectively filled by both local small brands and brands from the Asia-Pacific region. The successful expansion of Russian brand products into Asian countries and the presence of Asian manufacturers in Russia will allow the formation of a new landscape for small and medium-sized businesses. However, the promotion of programmes supporting entrepreneurial initiatives and the media's role in disseminating knowledge and promoting new brands remain relevant. How are consumer markets developing? Which niches are available? What is the consumer demand? What legislative barriers and challenges exist for businesses entering the markets of Russia and Asian countries? What trade and investment support is available for small business development from governments? How can new brands be promoted? What effective tools exist to enhance consumer knowledge and loyalty?


Moderator:
Alina Efimova — Deputy General Director for Sales and Business Development, Gazprom Media Sales House

Panellists:
Igor Vetryuk
Zhou Liqun
Konstantin Mayor — General Director, Mayer Group
Vitaly Mankevich — President, Russian-Asian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs (online)
Dmitry Mednikov — Managing Director, Russian Media Group
Mikhail Trufanov — General Director, XM-Digital

Front row participants:
Kirill Babaev — Director, Institute of China and Modern Asia of the Russian Academy of Sciences; Deputy Chairman of the Presidium, National BRICS Research Committee
Denis Bykov — Financial Director, Etazhi-Vladivostok
Valeriy Zhilin — Director for Marketing, Azbuka Mebeli

11.09.2023
15:00–16:30

Building D, level 6, conference hall 18

International Cooperation in a Changed World

Ensuring the Safe Movement of Capital


In the new geopolitical conditions, the Russian economy is undergoing a transformation. Business is in search of new ways to carry out foreign trade settlements and investments. Free movement of capital in the international space remains the ultimate goal of investors, which means that the main task is to ensure its safety. And here we need a set of measures aimed at eliminating international risks. How may we preserve the free movement of capital? How to ensure the safety and predictability of cross-border settlements? What effective mechanisms and instruments will protect investors from assuming excessive risk? What modern technologies are used by banks in the implementation of international projects? Which financial instruments may be in high demand and effective in these conditions?


Moderator:
Marina Belyakova — Partner, Tax, Law and Business Support Department, B1 Group

Panellists:
Alexey Guznov — Secretary of State – Deputy Chairman, The Central Bank of the Russian Federation (Bank of Russia)
Andrey Klepach — Chief Economist, VEB.RF
Oleg Melnikov — Executive Vice President, Head of Contracts Banking Support Department, Gazprombank
Mikhail Khardikov — Operations Director, En+ Group
Oleg Shibanov — Director of the Center for Macroeconomic Research, Sberbank (online)

11.09.2023
15:00–16:30

Building D, level 6, conference hall 17

Technological Development as a Guarantee of Sovereignty

The Creative Economy – Russia’s New Economic Driver


The creative economy has become vital to Russia’s economic development. According to the numbers for 2022, the creative industries contributed 4.87% of GDP to the national economy, with the indicator increasing to 2.0% over 2020 (1.9%) in the FEFD and showing clear sustainability in growth trends. In August 2023, the President signed a series of orders in support of the creative economy directed towards the development of individual creative industries as well as the economic spill over to related industries and the social sphere: the development of SMEs, the recognition of Russian brands, added value, territorial development, and youth migration. How can the Russian economy make the most of the creative class? What strategies for developing the creative economy in the regions have been effective? What can industry and project development programmes do to spur on the development of the creative sector in Russia? What additional measures of support are needed? How can the creative sector help to rebuild Russian projects and products and take them to the international market? What role should the government play in creating a sustainable link between the creative industries, IT, and business?


Moderator:
Ekaterina Cherkes-zade — Creative Economy Director, Agency for Strategic Initiatives to Promote New Projects

Panellists:
Roman Karmanov — Chief Executive Officer, Presidential Fund for Cultural Initiatives
Ilya Kuznetsov — Producer, Animation Studio Mechtalet
Aisen Nikolaev — Head of Sakha Republic (Yakutia)
Elvira Nurgalieva — Deputy Minister of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Alexander Chernikov — Director, Siberian Institute for the Development of Creative Industries

Front row participants:
Indira Zharova — Head, Ruptly
Afanasiy Savvin — General Director, Sakha Republic Development Corporation
Grigory Solomin — Managing Partner, Novaya Zemlya

11.09.2023
15:00–16:30

Building A, level 3, conference hall 2

International Cooperation in a Changed World

Russia’s Islands: Unique Opportunities for Partnership


Island territories (Russky Island, the Kurils, and Bolshoi Ussuriysky) are important for the development of the Far East and Russia as a whole. Each territory is unique, with its own competitive advantages. Russky Island is about science, technology, and tourism. Far Eastern Federal University and the unique Primorsky Aquarium have already been built, RusHydro’s first engineering centre is now up and running, and construction wrapped up this year on a cultural and educational center. The ‘Russian’ innovative science and technology centre, a megascience research facility, and a Rosneft engineering centre are currently in the design stage. Plans are in the works for major tourist projects and the development of exhibition and business infrastructure to accommodate SAR residents. The Kurils are all about tourism and fish processing, and with approximately 20 hotel facilities located on the islands (Iturup, Kunashir, and Shikotan), more than 85,000 tourists visited in 2022. The outlook for eco and cruise tourism there is promising. Fish processing facilities are also actively being developed on the islands, with centers on Kunashir and Shikotan. Bolshoi Ussuriysky Island is really about transportation, logistics, and tourism. Consultations are being held with China on a unified development concept for the island to include the creation of a Bolshoi Ussuriysky international transportation corridor, a ‘Russia’ international tourist park, and a ‘Nature of Russia’ safari park. What can be done to ensure the speedy development of the islands? How can new projects be attracted to the island territories? What additional support measures are needed to attract investors? Will existing infrastructure be sufficient?


Moderator:
Valeria Plotnikova — Managing Partner, Strategy Partners

Panellists:
Maksim Baksheev — Executive Director, KVC
Sergey Bachin — General Director, Vasta Discovery
Anatoliy Bobrakov — Deputy Minister of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Mikhail Degtyarev — Governor of Khabarovsky Territory
Anton Zaytsev — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Sakhalin Region
Sergei Ivanov — Special Representative of the President of the Russian Federation on Environmental Protection, Ecology and Transport

Front row participants:
Yuriy Egorov — Director, Nevada-Far East
Dmitriy Nozhenko — Chairman of the Board of Directors, Avrora Group
Mikhail Palennyy — Beneficiary, Arkhstroy Group
Nikolay Stetsko — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Primorsky Territory

11.09.2023
15:00–16:30

Building D, level 5, conference hall 14

II заседание президиума научно-экспертного совета Государственной комиссии по вопросам развития Арктики

11.09.2023
15:00–16:30

Building B, level 6, conference hall 6

Education and Upbringing as the Foundation of Independence

Sport in the Far East


In the new realities, the Far East for sports, as well as for other industries, is becoming the most important centre for new formats of international cooperation. Russian-Chinese exchanges in physical education and sports have entered their second year. Youth Games in winter and summer sports were held on a wide scale in China. And athletes from China took part in the International University Sports Festival and the Summer Deaflympics among other competitions in Russia. What can we already say about the results of the Years of Russian-Chinese Cooperation in Sports and Fitness? What roles do sports and classical diplomacy play in this process? What does the future hold for sporting cooperation between Russia, China, and other Asian countries? Russia has launched the World Friendship Games and other global sporting projects to be held in 2024. Have athletes from the Asia-Pacific Region shown interest in them? What new sports centres will appear in the Far East in the near future? A wide range of marathons and other large-scale competitions are actively popping up across the Far East. What kind of help do organizers need to take them global? What role does business play in creating the conditions needed to develop mass sports in the Far East?


Moderator:
Vasily Konov — Deputy General Producer, Match TV

Panellists:
Galina Izotova — Acting Chairman, Accounts Chamber of the Russian Federation
Konstantin Kolpakov — Chairman, Council of Young Diplomats Russian Foreign Ministry
Oleg Matytsin — Minister of Sport of the Russian Federation
Svetlana Romashina — Seven-Time Olympic Champion in Synchronized Swimming
Boris Rotenberg — Founder, Head of the Russian Motorsport Development Program, SMP Racing
Alexey Svirin — President, Russian Rowing Federation
Alexey Sorokin — General Director, Organizing Committee of the World Friendship Games
Marat Filippov — Secretary of the Council under the President of the Russian Federation for the Development of Physical Culture and Sports
Sergey Shishkarev — Chairman of the Board of Directors, Delo Group of Companies; Chairman of the Supreme Council, Handball Federation of Russia

Front row participants:
Georgy Bryusov — Director, Centre for Athletic Training of Russian National Teams (CAT)
Shanshan Guo — Attache of the Embassy of the People's Republic of China in the Russian Federation
Nadezhda Petrova — Olympic Medalist in Tennis
Mohammad Umair Bin Roshidi — Second Secretary, Malaysian Embassy in the Russian Federation

11.09.2023
15:00–16:30

Building B, level 6, conference hall 7

The Far East over the Past Decade: What has been a Success and What Remains to be Done?

Dealing With Natural Disasters: Prevention, Instead of Reaction


Statistics from recent years reveal that the Far Eastern and Siberian Federal Districts are systematically prone to natural fires and floods, resulting in loss of life, damage to the state's economy, and harm to the environment. Forest fires, the deterioration of infrastructure due to changes in soil load-bearing capacity, and heavy downpours lead to annual tragedies and economic losses. For instance, the emergency situation in August-September of this year in Primorsky Territory alone has already caused damage to the regional economy exceeding RUB 7.3 billion to date. What are the causes of such damage, and could it have been prevented? What materials and technologies should be used for the construction of transportation, housing, communal, and other infrastructure to protect the population and territories, as well as to minimize possible damage from emergencies? How are natural and man-made emergencies forecasted?


Moderator:
Aleksandr Bekker — Scientific Director of the Institute, Far Eastern Federal University; Doctor of Technical Sciences, Professor

Panellists:
Alexander Bondar — Director of the Department of Educational and Scientific and Technical Activities, Ministry of the Russian Federation for Civil Defense, Emergency Situations and Elimination of Consequences of Natural Disasters
Evgeny Grabchak — Deputy Minister of Energy of the Russian Federation
Vadim Nikanorov — Deputy Head, Federal Water Resources Agency
Irina Oltyan — Head, All-Russian Research Institute for Civil Defenсe and Emergencies of the Ministry for Civil Defence, Emergencies and Elimination of Consequences of Natural Disasters of the Russian Federation
Alexander Osipov — Governor of Trans-Baikal Territory
Elena Parkhomenko — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Primorsky Territory

Front row participant:
Andrey Makarov — Head of Directorate, Amur Basin Water Directorate of the Federal Water Resources Agency

11.09.2023
15:00–16:30

Building B, level 7, conference hall 11

Technological Development as a Guarantee of Sovereignty

Technological Development in Russia: Shifting the Focus from Catching Up to Overtaking


The state today has clearly a trajectory towards achieving technological sovereignty. The development of Russia's domestic critical technologies is both a priority and a prerequisite for the transition to an innovation-oriented economy. Simultaneously, big businesses, investors, and technology firms continue to explore effective models of collaboration amongst themselves within the scope of the overarching objective of technological independence. What are the most important technologies today for the state's sustainability? How can we best collaborate with all actors in the innovation chain to achieve technological progress? What role can and should the regions take on in this process?


Moderator:
Vladimir Pirozhkov — Head, Engineering Center of High-Complexity Prototyping "Kinetica", National Research Technological University MISiS

Panellists:
Igor Drozdov — Chairman of the Board, Skolkovo Foundation
Viktor Evtukhov — State Secretary – Deputy Minister of Industry and Trade of the Russian Federation
Vladislav Ivanenko — General Director, SPUTNIX
Vladimir Komlev — Chairman of the Management Board, Chief Executive Officer, National Payment Card System
Pavel Lyakhovich — Member of the Management Board, Executive Director, SIBUR LLC
Dmitry Peskov — Head of Young Professionals Direction, Agency for Strategic Initiatives to Promote New Projects; General Director, Platform of the National Technology Initiative; Special Representative of the President of the Russian Federation on Digital and Technological Development
Aleksey Raikevich — General Director, GLONASS
Ruslan Sarkisov — General Partner, Voskhod Venture Capital
Anatoly Semenov — Minister of Innovations, Digital Development and Communication Technologies of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)
Alexey Chekunkov — Minister of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic (online)
Ruslan Yunusov — Co-founder, Russian Quantum Center

11.09.2023
17:00–17:20

Building A, level 4, VEB.RF

The Far East over the Past Decade: What has been a Success and What Remains to be Done?

Invest Contact: Daily Summary


The Far East has great investment potential. During the day, project initiators presented their proposals to potential investors, lenders, and regional representatives. In this session, experts will discuss the results of the day and assess the potential for economic growth in the Far East. What are the development priorities in the Russian Far East today? How do investment projects enhance people's quality of life?


Moderator:
Mikhail Khomich — Managing Director for International Development, VEB.RF; Special Projects Director, Agency for Strategic Initiatives to Promote New Projects (ASI)

Panellists:
Maksim Oreshkin — Aide to the President of the Russian Federation
Igor Shuvalov — Chairman, VEB.RF

11.09.2023
17:15–18:45

Building B, level 6, conference hall 9

International Cooperation in a Changed World

Sanctions as an Opportunity for Development


Despite unprecedented pressure from sanctions, the Russian economy is adapting to the restrictions and is in fact demonstrating significant potential for sustainability and growth. In addition to the obvious negative ramifications, the tightening of sanctions could serve as an impetus to boost and develop domestic production, strengthen partnerships between business and science, and introduce innovative technologies to create high-tech products and develop human resources. The measures taken by the Russian government have helped to somewhat reduce the impact of sanctions, primarily because Russia is reorienting its partnerships towards countries in Asia, Africa, and South America. It is crucial for Russia to continue searching for new opportunities to intensify and diversify its economy and ensure its sustainable development despite the crisis and the actions of unfriendly states. In this regard, many questions still need to be answered. What opportunities are emerging for domestic producers as they grapple with sanctions? What sectors of the economy could become engines of economic growth? How effective are the state support measures that have already been taken, and what additional incentives can the government create for the domestic economy? Boosting confidence in the economy means stimulating economic cooperation and finding new areas for business and the state to collaborate while also building more mobile, efficient, and secure infrastructure for financial interaction. The methods and tools used to objectively assess the real impact of the sanctions on the economy as a whole, the functioning of individual industries, and the lives of Russian citizens are extremely important today. How can we properly assess the effectiveness and efficiency of the protectionist response measures that have been taken? What is the role and importance of science, innovation, and digital technologies in ensuring economic growth and improving efficiency at all levels of the Russian economy in the new realities?


Moderator:
Ivan Lobanov — Rector, Plekhanov Russian University of Economics

Panellists:
Kirill Bychkov — First Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)
Nikolay Volobuev
Dmitry Volvach — Deputy Minister of Economic Development of the Russian Federation (online)
Konstantin Dolgov — Deputy Chairman of the Committee on Economic Policy of the Federation Council of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation
Galina Izotova — Acting Chairman, Accounts Chamber of the Russian Federation
Karin Kneissl — Head, Center G.O.R.K.I. (Geopolitical Observatory on Key Issues in Russia); Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Austria (2017–2019)
Denis Kravchenko — Deputy Chairman of the Committee of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation on Economic Policy
Evgeniy Popov — Deputy Chairman of the Committee of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation on Information Policy, Information Technologies and Communications; Anchor, Russia-1 Channel
Natalya Popova — First Deputy General Director, Innopraktika
Evgeniy Chekin — Chairman of the Government of of Kamchatka Territory
He Zhenwei — Chairman, China Overseas Development Association
Alexander Shokhin — President, Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs

Front row participants:
Dmitry Viktorov — Director, NPO Akonit
Artem Lukin — Chief Executive Officer, TECHNORED
Ildar Neverov — General Director, State Trust Arktikugol
Alexey Fedorov — "Quantum Information Technologies" Scientific Group Head, Russian Quantum Center; Head of the Laboratory of Quantum Information Technologies, MISIS University (online)

11.09.2023
17:15–18:45

Building A, level 3, conference hall 2

International Cooperation in a Changed World

Greater Eurasia: Drivers for the Formation of an Alternative International Monetary and Financial System


Amidst the backdrop of fundamental changes in the global economic architecture, Eurasian economies are exhibiting relative stability. Simultaneously, the factor of integration is assuming an increasingly significant stabilizing role, and integration associations are evolving into centres of economic power. According to numerous experts, it is Eurasia that has the potential to become a catalyst for fresh stimuli in economic growth, drawing upon its extensive scientific, technical, and production capabilities. This involves the advancement of IT, high technology, and resource infrastructure. The steady progress of Eurasia, serving the welfare of all inhabitants of the continent and economic entities, greatly hinges on the effective operation of a sustainable monetary and financial system. The current global trade and financial system fails to adhere to the principles of transparency, efficiency, fairness, and equity. The holders of reserve currencies exploit their monopoly position, extracting financial rents from other nations and employing their currencies as "financial weapons" through unilateral sanctions not sanctioned by the UN Security Council. At the same time, the creators of the world's reserve currencies are entering another phase of instability, escalating their debt burden beyond reasonable thresholds and resolving their issues at the cost of others. Russia, like a number of other countries in Greater Eurasia, is forced to switch to national currencies in trade. However, aspects such as pricing, insurance, and other crucial infrastructural components continue to be under the purview of the jurisdictions of the issuers of the world's reserve currencies. What could be the foundation for a more stable financial system, and is it feasible to construct it through an international treaty grounded in the principles of transparency, efficiency, fairness, and equity? What can Greater Eurasia offer to create a new monetary and financial architecture? What set of institutions, resources, and procedures are needed to launch such a system? What are the prospects for the establishment of a unified Eurasian exchange, payment, and settlement space? What opportunities for interaction exist between integration associations, the largest economies, and smaller economies of Eurasia? How can a "win-win" mode be ensured when initiating the system?


Moderator:
Alexey Bobrovsky — Economic Observer

Panellists:
Aleksandr Babakov — Deputy Chairman of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation
Wang Wen — Executive Dean, Chongyang Institute for Financial Studies, Renmin University of China (RDCY)
Sergey Glazyev — Member of the Board, Minister in Charge of Integration and Macroeconomics, Eurasian Economic Commission (online)
Kan Zaw — Union Minister of Investment and Foreign Economic Relations of the Republic of the Union of Myanmar
Andrey Klepach — Chief Economist, VEB.RF
Oleg Solntsev — Deputy General Director, Head of Monetary Policy Analysis, Center for Macroeconomic Analysis and Short-term Forecasting
Sohail Khan — Deputy Secretary General, Secretariat of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (online)
Aleksandr Shirov — Director, Head of the Analysis, Production Potential Forecasting and Cross industry Cooperation Lab, Institute of Economic Forecasting of the Russian Academy of Sciences

Front row participants:
Oleg Noginskiy — Head of the Expert Group, Scientific Center for Eurasian Integration
Pepe Escobar — Economic and Geopolitical Analyst, Federative Republic of Brazil

11.09.2023
17:15–18:45

Building B, level 6, conference hall 6

The Far East over the Past Decade: What has been a Success and What Remains to be Done?

Discovering the Far East: Tiger and Leopard Trails


More and more tourists are visiting the Far East every year: the Far Eastern Federal District is home to six UNESCO World Heritage Sites, approximately 60% of the country’s protected areas, and its longest stretch of coastline. In 2021, the flow of tourists into the Far East had already surpassed pre-pandemic levels by more than 10%, and in 2023 exceeded the average Russian growth rate by 35%. However, trips to the Far Eastern Federal District remain but a small portion of those in the country as a whole at just under 5%. International tourism, which used to account for up to 15% of tourists to the Far East before the pandemic, is beginning to recover. Cross-border tourist routes, a single electronic visa, and open air and sea borders will all contribute to an inflow of tourists from abroad and the creation of new investment projects. By 2030, the total number of tourists visiting the Far Eastern Federal District may double, requiring an increase of at least 150% in the number of available rooms. Unique conditions have been created in the macro-region to attract new investors and increase the scale of business being conducted: every tenth project implemented with state support is related to tourism, and the Far East tourism plan has called for the creation of a further 12 investment projects. However, the cost of building a hotel in the Far East differs from the cost of building one in central Russia. At the same time, the fragile ecosystems of the Far East are the ones most vulnerable in the face of increasing tourism. How can we unlock the potential of eco-tourism as a tool for investment and preservation of natural reserves as humans increasingly alter nature. How can hospitality infrastructure in the Far East cope as the number of visitors to the macro-region continues to increase every year? How can we retain staff and increase the profitability of accommodations in the Far East in a difficult climatic season? What goals should be achieved in the development of tourism and hospitality in Russia and the Far East by 2030?


Moderator:
Bogdan Bulychev — Traveler, Blogger, Producer

Panellists:
Sergey Aramilev — General Director, Amur Tiger Centre Autonomous Non-Profit Organization
Dmitry Vakhrukov — Deputy Minister Economic Development of the Russian Federation
Maria Zakharova — Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary; Director, Department of Information and the Press, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation
Alexey Karakhan — Traveler
Sergey Krasnoperov — Executive Director, Corporation Tourism.RF
Elena Krylova — Founder, Interior Design Studio Elena Krylova
Anton Perin — Senior Banker, VEB.RF
Igor Sivets — Deputy General Director for Business Development, Tutu.ru
Ruslan Terekbayev — President, Legend Hotels Group

Front row participants:
Александр Бардалеев — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Trans-Baikal Territory - Minister of Economic Development of the Trans-Baikal Territory
Konstantin Styrin — Deputy Chairman of the Management Board, Russian Agricultural Bank

11.09.2023
17:15–18:45

Building B, level 6, conference hall 8

Education and Upbringing as the Foundation of Independence

Towards a Common Future: What Social and Cultural Business Initiatives Await the Far East?


The contribution of corporations and private and corporate foundations to the development of socio-cultural projects increases the economic sustainability of the region, its tourist attractiveness, and the satisfaction of the local population. As a result, cities receive new social initiatives, modern public spaces, and branches of major federal institutions. Statistics confirms the growing interest of both business and the state in the development of socio-cultural projects. For instance, budget expenditures on culture have grown 1.6 times in 7 years by 2020; the share of companies implementing cultural projects has grown from 48% to 60% over the last five years; and total business expenditures on social projects are growing annually by an average of RUB 50 billion. An additional incentive is public demand: according to PBN, almost 70% of Russians believe that companies should help the country by organizing cultural events, creating social infrastructure, and solving social problems. What is the role of corporations in developing effective social practices in the places where they operate? How do corporate social responsibility (CSR) programmes affect the company's economic performance and change life in the regions? In the new environment, how do business priorities and opportunities correlate with the needs of the population? What motivates companies and foundations to launch new socio-cultural projects: their own strategy, the demand of external audiences, or the interest of employees? How will foundations and companies create points of attraction in cities of the Far Eastern Federal District in 2024, develop communities, and improve the quality of life? Return on investment: what goals and target values of indicators are set when launching social projects?


Moderator:
Igor Korotetskiy — Head of the Group for the Provision of Services in the Field of Operational Risks and Sustainable Development, Kept

Panellists:
Aleksandra Boldyreva — Executive Director, Russian Donors Forum
Andrey Vinyukov — First Deputy General Director, Coal Mining Company “Kolmar”
Yuliya Morozova — Deputy Chairman, Government of Kamchatskiy Krai
Alexander Popov — Vice President, Head of the Trans-Baikal Division, OJSC MMC Norilsk Nickel
Antonina Priezzheva — Director of the Personnel Management, Gazprom-Media Holding
Olga Shamaiko — Head of the Assisted Employment Project, Naked Heart Foundation (online)

Front row participants:
Lyudmila Danilova — Executive Director, Kupol Social Development Fund
Veronika Sipacheva — President, Energy of Participation Fund

11.09.2023
17:15–18:45

Building A, level 5, conference hall 4

Technological Development as a Guarantee of Sovereignty

Priorities for Healthcare Development: Innovative Technologies and Personalized Medicine


Today, high-tech healthcare can significantly improve the quality of life for people in need of medical care due to: high-tech operations, informative modern diagnostic methods, personalized rehabilitation technologies, remote consultations, as well as the remote monitoring of patients’ health. High-tech healthcare can only develop with an industrial and technological base for the production of: modern diagnostic equipment, original medicines and innovative medical materials, and the development of genomic technologies. The use of advanced technologies to prevent diseases is equally important. Modern clusters and centres of preventive medicine in Russia already offer a high level of treatment based on advanced healthcare technologies. What new tools are currently being used in the Far East to improve the provision of medical care? What priorities exist for developing high-tech healthcare to improve people’s health and quality of life in remote and hard-to-reach regions? What are the most effective forms of cooperation in healthcare between the state and business in Russia and Asia-Pacific countries?


Moderator:
Evelina Zakamskaya — Chief Editor, Doctor TV Channel

Panellists:
Igor Borisevich — Deputy Head, Federal Medical-Biological Agency of the Russian Federation
Elena Zhidkova — Head of the Clinics Network, Russian Railways-Medicine – A Branch of Russian Railways; General Director, Russian Railways-Medicine
Aleksey Kedrin — Chairman of the Board, Association of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers of the Eurasian Economic Union (EAEU) (online)
Azer Mamedov — Director of the Investment Department, Russian Direct Investment Fund (RDIF)
Alexander Sergeev — Scientific Supervisor, National Center for Physics and Mathematics (NCFM)
Victor Fisenko — First Deputy Minister of Health of the Russian Federation
Irina Yarovaya — Deputy Chairman of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation

Front row participants:
Olesya Mishina — Head, Navigator medicine
Maxim Chernin — Co-Founder, Chairman of the Board of Directors, Doctor Nearby

11.09.2023
17:15–18:45

Building B, level 6, conference hall 7

Education and Upbringing as the Foundation of Independence

Higher Education: How Will Russia Look Tomorrow?


Education is an essential driver of economic growth and social development. The academic leadership programme ‘Priority 2030. The Russian Far East’ was created to keep university students in the Far East. Institutions of higher education in the Far East are working on network educational programmes, promoting the development of science, and contributing to the qualitative growth of human capital. The programme is seeing its first results, and they are an improvement in the quality of strategic planning in higher education and increase interested from applicants in programmes of higher education in the Far East. How is ‘Priority 2030. The Russian Far East’ influencing the transformation of universities? What challenges have universities faced? How does the programme affect regional development in the short and long term? What kind of development and support do university teams need? Should the new reality be changing how we communicate with applicants?


Moderator:
Inna Shevchenko — Rector, Southern Federal University (SFedU)

Panellists:
Dmitry Afanasiev — Deputy Minister of Science and Higher Education of the Russian Federation (online)
Irina Zhukova — Director of the Agricultural Education Development Center, Innopraktika
Kirill Kravchenko — Deputy Cheif Executive Officer, Gazprom Neft
Artur Martirosov — Venture Partner, Voskhod Venture Capital
Anatoly Nikolaev — Rector, Ammosov North-Eastern Federal University
Elvira Nurgalieva — Deputy Minister of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Alexander Samardak — Acting Rector, Sakhalin State University

Front row participants:
Denis Burov — Rector, Admiral Nevelsky Maritime State University
Elena Kharisova — Vice-Rector for Development, Far Eastern Federal University; General Director, Fund for the Development of Innovative Scientific and Technological Center "Russky"

11.09.2023
17:15–18:45

Building B, level 7, conference hall 12

The Far East over the Past Decade: What has been a Success and What Remains to be Done?

The Ocean: The Evolution of Fishing and Consumption


The fishery industry in the Far East is currently undergoing a renewal of its production and processing capacities. The primary driver for this renewal is the implementation of a quota-based incentive system in exchange for investments. Thanks to this resource-based mechanism, the Far East fishery basin has witnessed the construction of 14 high-tech fish processing plants, five fishing vessels, and five crab trawlers. What will the rules be for the second phase of the investment quota mechanism? What will it entail? Has work been done to rectify the mistakes? The multiplied financial and regulatory burden on fishermen must be taken into account, and a balance is needed. What do fishermen think? The time has come for import substitution opportunities in the industry, the creation of domestic independent production facilities, and the establishment of reliable foreign partnerships that are not subject to outside influence. The primary focus of the Far East fishery is the domestic market. The traditional mechanisms of market saturation are no longer applicable, and it is unacceptable for aquatic bioresource pricing on the country's trade shelves to be currency-dependent. Aquaculture serves as a robust driver of growth, and reforms are imperative.


Moderator:
Alexander Panin — Chairman, 'Fish Union' Non-Profit Organization

Panellists:
Roman Vityazev — Chairman, Far Eastern Union of Mariculture Enterprises; Chairman, Hyperion
Andrey Grechkin — General Director, Dalreftrans
Khasan Likhov — Deputy Head, Federal Agency for Fisheries (Rosrybolovstvo)
Georgy Martynov — President, Association of Fishery Enterprises of Primorye Territory
Sergey Mironov — Chairman, Federation of Restaurateurs and Hoteliers of Russia (FRiO)
Olga Morozova — Director for Commerce and Development, Lenta
Olga Naumova — General Director, Russian Fishery Company
Olesya Popova — Business Development Director, Founder, Food Team
Oleg Ryabov — Director of "Fish" Department, Globus
Vladimir Solodov — Governor of Kamchatka Territory
Sergey Tarusov — Chairman, Lenin Collective Farm Fishery
Ilya Chernov — Director of the Investment Development Department, Ministry of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic

11.09.2023
17:15–18:45

Building D, level 5, conference hall 13

International Cooperation in a Changed World

A New Political and Economic Model of the World


The pandemic, new conflicts, and long-term socio-economic trends are resulting in a new global outlook. The model of the new world is still multidirectional, filled with internal contradictions, instability, and immaturity, but it is radically different from the world of the late 20th to early 21st century. The geographical drivers of this new model include Pacific Asia, Eurasia, including Russia, and African countries. It is the responsibility of politicians and the academic community to understand this new world model. How distant they are in their assessments …


Moderator:
Artem Malgin — Vice-Rector for Development, Director of the MGIMO Development Program "Priority - 2030", MGIMO University

Panellists:
Kirill Babaev — Director, Institute of China and Modern Asia of the Russian Academy of Sciences; Deputy Chairman of the Presidium, National BRICS Research Committee
Pornchai Danvivathana — Secretary General, Asia Cooperation Dialogue (ACD)
Andrey Keller — Director of the Sociocenter - the Operator of the Program "Priority - 2030"
Sergey Krasilnikov — Vice President, Managing Director of the International Relations and Integration Directorate, Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs (RSPP)
Khamsen Sisavong — Vice President of Lao National Chamber of Commerce and Industry
Carlos Tabunda — Dean of the Faculty of International Relations, Director, Center for Russian Studies, New Era University
Ulugbek Khasanov — Head of the Department of International Relations, University of World Economy and Diplomacy

11.09.2023
17:15–18:45

Building D, level 5, conference hall 14

Education and Upbringing as the Foundation of Independence

Women in the Humanitarian and Economic Development of the Territories of the North, Siberia, and the Far East


Large-scale infrastructure and humanitarian projects are being implemented in the North, Siberia and the Far East. The participation of women in preserving the unique ecosystems and identity, culture and traditions of the peoples of Russia’s northern regions, in improving citizens’ welfare, and in the sustainable development of territories is helping to solve some of Russia’s most important socio-economic issues. Talking about them at high-profile discussion platforms helps to provide an overview of effective solutions to the whole range of problems facing the North, whilst constant monitoring of the implementation of these solutions guarantees their success. What are the top-priority measures of support for women in healthcare and social welfare in Russia’s northern regions? How can we find a balance between conserving ecosystems and developing territories? What steps need to be taken to increase women’s participation in developing the economies of these regions? What programmes aimed at increasing women’s participation in all spheres of society is the corporate sector willing to scale up in the northern regions?


Moderator:
Maria Afonina

Panellists:
Olga Batalina — First Deputy Minister of Labor and Social Protection of the Russian Federation (online)
Natalya Gonchar — Head of Corporate Relations Department, Sakhalin Energy
Galina Karelova — Deputy Chairman, Federation Council of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation (online)
Evgenia Kotova — Deputy Minister of Health of the Russian Federation (online)
Elena Myakotnikova — Director of Climate Initiatives and Carbon Management, SIBUR
Alexandra Ryabykh — Co-founder, Association of Women in the Nuclear Industry Foundation; Co-chairman, "Ecosystem" All-Russian Ecological Movement
Tatiana Sakharova — Coordinator, Women and Their Role in the Development of Naval Cities, Council of the Eurasian Women’s Forum (online)
Roza Chemeris — Member of the Committee of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation on Foreign Affairs
Elena Shumakova — Deputy Governor of Khanty‑Mansi Autonomous Area–Yugra

11.09.2023
17:15–18:45

Building D, level 6, conference hall 19

International Cooperation in a Changed World

Scientific Diplomacy in Asia: Constructive Cooperation


The current active expansion of Russia’s ties with the Global South and its most important region, Asia, requires the use of various forms, methods, and channels of interaction that aim to enhance their effectiveness. One of these channels is science diplomacy: a kind of public diplomacy that is part of international scientific cooperation and aims to solve problems that are common to mankind and establish cooperation between countries and peoples. Science is developing rapidly in modern Asia. The weight and influence of these countries in world politics is growing, as academic communities contribute more heavily to the establishment of an independent foreign policy in their states as well as the potential and activities of their science diplomacy. Can advanced scientific knowledge be developed without diplomacy, and is diplomacy effective without science? What can the scientific community do to unite humanity in overcoming the current global challenges? How does the experience that has been gained by countries and academic communities in Asian states showcase how science has helped shape an appropriate and effective foreign policy? What role can science diplomacy play in overcoming political, historical, cultural, ethnic, religious, and other contradictions in Asia and around the world? What are the opportunities and goals of science diplomacy in Russia’s interregional and border relations? What kind of international scientific organizations are needed to maximize the achievement of the goals of developing international scientific cooperation?


Moderators:
Mikhail Kuznetsov — Director, Eastern State Planning Center (FANU Vostokgosplan)
Viktor Larin — Vice Chairman, Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences

Panellists:
Xing Guangcheng — Director, Institute for Border Studies of China, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (online)
Andrey Denisov — First Deputy Chair of the Federation Council Committee on Foreign Affairs; Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
Yuriy Kulchin — Chairman, Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences
Vitaly Naumkin — Scientific Director, Institute of Oriental Studies of the Russian Academy of Sciences
Sergey Sanakoev — Deputy Chairman, Russian-Chinese Friendship Society; Deputy Chairman, Russian Part of the Business Council of the Far East of the Russian Federation and the North-East of the People's Republic of China; Member of the Russian International Affairs Council (RIAC)

Front row participant:
Evgeniy Rusetskiy — Head of Asia-Pacific Representative Office, International Congress of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs

11.09.2023
17:15–18:45

Building D, level 6, conference hall 17

The Far East over the Past Decade: What has been a Success and What Remains to be Done?

Returning Home: The Effects of Special Administrative Districts for Businesses and Society


The global situation with economic and foreign policy has significantly increased the interest of foreign companies with Russian participation in Special Administrative Regions (SARs). Each year sees a new record for the number of companies switching jurisdiction to the Russian Federation and becoming SAR participants: between 2020 and August 2023, the number of participants registered in the SAR on Russky Island had increased from 2 to 61. In addition, a number of fundamental changes to Russian law are planned for approval in 2023 to allow companies to de-offshore through mechanisms other than redomiciliation. How has the SAR on Russky Island been trending over the past year and what are the results? How do SAR participants affect the development of the region? What changes in legislation have been adopted / will be adopted to make it easier for business to return to Russia? What risks do companies redomiciling face and what are the alternatives? Are companies happy in the SAR?


Moderator:
Marina Belyakova

Panellists:
Alexey Vostokov — Chief Executive Officer, Polyus
Nikolay Zhuravlev — Deputy Chairman of the Federation Council of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation
Alexander Iodchin — Director for Strategy and Development, Global Ports Management Company
Nikolay Stetsko — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Primorsky Territory
Ilya Torosov — First Deputy Minister of Economic Development of the Russian Federation

Front row participants:
Andrey Tolmachev — General Director, Kaliningrad Region Development Corporation
Pavel Sheika — Director of Department for Special Administrative Region Support, Far East and Arctic Development Corporation

11.09.2023
17:15–18:45

Building D, level 6, conference hall 18

Education and Upbringing as the Foundation of Independence

Professionalism Index: A New Workforce for the New Economy


The economy in the Far East needs skilled personnel. Vocational professions are increasingly becoming the informed choice of the younger generation and a guarantee of a successful start to their careers. The Professionalism project is successfully transforming education in colleges and technical schools, getting business actively involved in the personnel training process. How can we strike a balance between secondary vocational education and employers’ demands? How can educational programmes be made more relevant? How can we build a meaningful dialogue between business and educational institutions?


Moderator:
Evgeniy Szhenov — Scientific Supervisor, "Scientific and Educational Policy" Expert and Analytical Center

Panellists:
Alexander Bugaev — First Deputy Minister of Enlightenment of the Russian Federation
Hasan Hasanbalayev — Executive Director for Social Development, Corporation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Mikhail Ivanov — Deputy General Director, GORA
Evgeny Petrov — Head, Federal Agency for Subsoil Use
Dmitry Shahanov — Deputy Director General, Russian Railways

Front row participants:
Nikolay Dolgov — Director for Development of Professionals 4.0 Platform, Gazprom
Aleksandra Lebedeva — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Kamchatka Territory
Maxim Lopatin — Director, Khabarovsk Industrial and Economic College
Sofia Malyavina — General Director, National Priorities
Olga Petrova — Deputy Minister of Science and Higher Education of the Russian Federation
Pavel Stepanov — Deputy General Director, Geoscan Group of Companies
Mikhail Khardikov — Operations Director, En+ Group

11.09.2023
17:15–18:45

Building D, level 6, conference hall 20

Technological Development as a Guarantee of Sovereignty

Supporting and Protecting Business in the Digital Sphere: Legal Benchmarks for the Far East


The modern digital economy represents a transition to fundamentally new formats of the exchange of information, the organizational restructuring of business and of the administration of government, and the emergence of qualitatively new legal challenges and requirements for the legal protection of business in the digital sphere. Boosting the openness of communications opens up new horizons for entrepreneurial activity, but at the same time means that new approaches must be developed in order to ensure the required level of security for SMEs and state corporations. Unfortunately, the current level of legal protection of businesses in the digital sphere can hardly be seen as sufficient. Despite the fact that in recent years particular attention has been paid to measures to support and stimulate digital business, it remains the most vulnerable part of the digital economic space. This is largely because the formation of the technological regulatory environment takes place outside the framework of understanding of the legal boundaries of business security and the development of models for the protectability of digital entities. What are the legal risks associated with conducting digital business in Russia? How can cybersecurity be guaranteed? Can the law adapt to modern digital technologies? How can we reduce the vulnerability of digital business? How do digital technologies help protect entrepreneurs? And is it possible to say that a branch of digital law is beginning to emerge in Russia?


Moderator:
Elina Sidorenko — Doctor of Law, Professor; Director of the Center for Digital Economy and Financial Innovation, MGIMO University

Panellists:
Yaroslav Aleynik — General Director, Omega
Artem Vasilyev — Rector, Synergy University
Artem Kononenko — Deputy Head of the Main Directorate for the Supervision of Federal Legislation Execution – Head of the Department for Supervision of Observance of the Rights of Entrepreneurs, Prosecutor General's Office of the Russian Federation
Sergey Morozov — First Deputy Chairman, Committee of the Russian State Duma on Regional Policy and Local Self-Government
Dmitry Pristanskov — State Secretary - Vice President, Norilsk Nickel
Yakov Sergienko — General Director, Yakov & Partners
Aleksey Serko — State Secretary – Deputy Minister of the Russian Federation for Civil Defence, Emergencies and Elimination of Consequences of Natural Disasters
Danil Filippov — Deputy Head, Investigative Department, Ministry of Internal Affairs of the Russian Federation
Alexander Shenderyuk-Zhidkov — Senator of the Federation Council of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation
Alexander Shokhin — President, Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs

11.09.2023
17:15–18:45

Building A, level 3, conference hall 3

The Far East over the Past Decade: What has been a Success and What Remains to be Done?

Forest Industrial Complex: Realities and Prospects


The use of LesEGAIS has made it possible to trace the fate of each tree, to create transparency in the supply chain from harvesting areas to the end consumer, and to streamline the work of various regional and federal agencies. The state is not standing still and continues to advance the digitalization of the forest complex, but there is an obstacle in the form of outdated forest inventory materials. These materials hinder not only the government but also businesses, which are unable to obtain forest land for lease. The reshuffling of global timber industry flows results in increased logistics costs and, consequently, reduced revenue from timber sales. Within these processes, there is a need for government support in developing transport routes and assisting businesses in adapting to current conditions while maintaining jobs and the tax efficiency of enterprises. How can we address the problem of a lack of information on forestry and streamline operations through digitization? How to increase the investment appeal of the industry? What does business lack? What support measures are required from the government? What should we start, and what should we continue?


Moderator:
Alla Sbitneva — Project Director, Sberbank

Panellists:
Oleg Bocharov — Deputy Minister of Industry and Trade of the Russian Federation
Dmitrii Dobrynin — Vice President, New Forest Pro (online)
Evgenii Korzh — Director, Eco Toys
Nikolay Krotov — Deputy General Director, Arkhangelsk PPM
Vladimir Krylov — Deputy Director, St. Petersburg State Forest Technical University (online)
Viacheslav Spirenkov — Deputy Head, Federal Forestry Agency
Konstantin Stepanov — Minister of Forestry and Protection of Wildlife of the Primorsky Krai

11.09.2023
17:25–18:45

Building B, level 7, conference hall 11

The Far East of the Future

The Far East Concession: Modern Infrastructure for Far Eastern Cities


Russia is in the process of developing master plans for Far Eastern cities to reshape their image and enhance the social and economic environments. The Far East Concession Programme, launched in 2021, primarily focuses on enhancing urban infrastructure to improve the quality of life for residents of the Far East and to drive social and economic development in the region. This is achieved through the multiplier effects of the new infrastructure, benefiting residents who live, work, study, raise children, and visit the Far East. The programme is currently in demand by regions and investors as a tool that, under existing budget constraints, allows the construction of complex infrastructure that cannot be created without sharing financial risks between the state and businesses. Once created, this infrastructure will be in demand for many generations to come. By the end of 2023, there are plans to launch a minimum of 30 facilities within the master plans of Far Eastern cities, with a combined estimated cost of at least RUB 150 billion. At the same time, current economic conditions also necessitate the development of the Far East's economy, and this cannot be achieved without the implementation of new transportation and industrial infrastructure. In general, the new conditions of economic development require the consolidation of efforts by all stakeholders to formulate an optimal approach and foster interaction to address the strategic objectives of economic development, the financial market, and infrastructure renewal. This includes taking into account the opportunities and limitations of PPPs.


Moderator:
Alexander Dolgov — Partner, Head of Infrastructure and Public-Private Partnerships, Better Chance

Panellists:
Alexander Aksakov — Director of Infrastructure Bonds Division, DOM.RF
Anatoliy Bobrakov — Deputy Minister of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Vitaly Korolev — Deputy Head, Federal Antimonopoly Service of the Russian Federation
Denis Nozdrachev — General Director, InfraVEB
Sergey Nosov — Governor of Magadan Region
Pavel Puzanov — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Amur Region

Front row participants:
Anna Baginskaya — Managing Director, Head of the PPP Center, Sberbank
Andrey Blokhin — Minister of Economic Development of the Primorsky Krai
Valery Eremin — General Director, System Concessions
Maksim Ignatyev — Director for Government Relations and Regional Programs, Delo
Anna Kokorina — Head of the Department of State Capital Investments of the Ministry of Economy of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)
Georgy Fotin — General Director, GDK Baimskaya
Vitaly Shishmarev — Deputy General Director, BTS-MOST

12.09.2023
10:00–11:30

Building A, level 3, conference hall 3

The Far East of the Future

A New Image of the Far East


Russia has confidently turned to the East and is now paying increased attention to the Far East regions with major investment projects, the construction of the Northern Sea Route, unprecedented preferential regimes, and large housing and infrastructure construction projects. But how is the perception of Russians of the territories in the east of the country changing? Is the Far East becoming closer? Has the popular notion of "far away and unknown" changed to "close and attractive"? What are the cornerstones of the territories’ brand identity and what is required for them to compete for human resources?


Moderator:
Sofia Malyavina — General Director, National Priorities

Panellists:
Konstantin Abramov — General Director, All-Russian Public Opinion Research Center Foundation (VTsIOM); Chairman, Public Council under the Ministry of Labor and Social Protection of the Russian Federation
Kirill Bychkov — First Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)
Aleksandra Lebedeva — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Kamchatka Territory
Anna Lenz — Project Director, Strelka Design Bureau
Anatoly Nikolaev — Rector, Ammosov North-Eastern Federal University
Elvira Nurgalieva — Deputy Minister of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Ivan Podbereznyak — Chairman of the Board, SME Bank

Front row participants:
Yelena Gafforova — Vice Rector for Academic Affairs, Far Eastern Federal University
Igor Gorevoy — General Director, "Amur.life" Media Group
Mikhail Ivanov — Deputy General Director, GORA
Taras Sharyga — Co-Founder and Head, "BEREGI" Company

12.09.2023
10:00–11:30

Building A, level 5, conference hall 4

Education and Upbringing as the Foundation of Independence

Priorities for the Development of Universities in the Far East and the Arctic as Drivers of Socioeconomic and Technological Development of the Territories


Solving social, economic and infrastructural problems in the Arctic and the Far East is impossible without attracting talented young people. At the federal level, there are numerous programmes aimed at attracting young people to science, IT and other high-tech areas. Universities play a key role in the implementation of such projects, providing a link between schoolchildren, students and graduates (employees). The participation of Far Eastern universities in the Priority 2030 programme and the Advanced Engineering Schools project has facilitated the launch of new tools for working with young people and competing for talent alongside metropolitan universities. This engagement has also fostered collaborations with businesses and the region, which are essential for the successful execution of strategic projects. What do universities in the Arctic and Far East need to do to be attractive to applicants, young teachers and researchers? What are the most effective tools for attracting talented young people today? What problems do universities and employers face, and why has the issue of staff shortage remained acute for a long time? What measures should be taken at the federal/regional/local level to attract talent to the Far East?


Moderator:
Irina Zhukova — Director of the Agricultural Education Development Center, Innopraktika

Panellists:
Andrey Voronin — Director, Center for Strategic Initiatives, MISIS University; Deputy Chairman, Coordinating Council for Youth Affairs in the Scientific and Educational Spheres of the Council under the President of the Russian Federation for Science and Education
Hasan Hasanbalayev — Executive Director for Social Development, Corporation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Yulia Goryachkina — Director for the "Personnel for the Digital Economy" Direction, Digital Economy (online)
Sergey Zverev — Deputy Director, Integration Education Development Center; Member of the Coordinating Council for Youth Affairs in the Scientific and Educational Spheres of the Council under the President of the Russian Federation for Science and Education
Boris Korobets
Alexander Samardak — Acting Rector, Sakhalin State University
Lyudmila Tekutyeva — General Director, Arnika

12.09.2023
10:00–11:30

Building B, level 6, conference hall 6

The Far East of the Future

Rental Homes: A Comfortable Flat for Every Specialist

In partnership with DOM.RF

The development of the Far East continues to be a priority of government policy, and it is moving forward quickly. It is essential that we create the conditions top retain and develop human resources for industry and society. A new presidential programme to create 10,000 rental flats for young professionals and students among others aims to resolve this issue. What has the Programme already managed to accomplish and what steps are planned for the future? What challenges await? What regulatory changes are needed at the federal and regional levels?


Moderator:
Veronika Yanushkevich — Director for Rental Housing Development, DOM.RF

Panellists:
Alexey Vostokov — Chief Executive Officer, Polyus
Gadzhimagomed Guseynov — First Deputy Minister of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Vladislav Kuznetsov — Acting Governor of the Chukotka Autonomous Region
Yury Marfin — Acting Rector, Pacific State University
Vitaly Mutko — Chief Executive Officer, DOM.RF
Aisen Nikolaev — Head of Sakha Republic (Yakutia)
Nikita Stasishin — Deputy Minister of Construction, Housing and Utilities of the Russian Federation
Aigul Yusupova — Managing Partner, Unikey

Front row participant:
Sergey Nosov — Governor of Magadan Region

12.09.2023
10:00–11:30

Building A, level 3, conference hall 2

The Logistics of Change

Maritime Logistics: Strategies for Exponential Growth

In partnership with Delo Group

The development of the global maritime logistics industry is part of a long-term trend as production costs decrease, and the green operation of the fleet increases. The extreme increase in orders for new vessels in 2020–2021 was spurred on by the lengthening of global logistics chains and the resulting reduction in turnover, and consequently, the market will welcome a fleet of record capacity in 2023–2025. The green agenda is significantly changing the requirements for new ships: by the beginning of 2023, roughly 40% of vessels built must be capable of running on alternative fuels. And the globalization of maritime logistics has led to an increase in regionalization and initiatives to create national shipping companies. The outlook is ambiguous for projects launched by large conglomerates in digital platforms and information systems. Over the last year and a half, the Russian economy has seen the departure of almost all global sea carriers depart to be replaced by an abundance of smaller operators. Domestic companies are forced to look for new solutions for foreign trade, the bulk of which has traditionally passed through seaports. At the same time, an imbalance in imports and exports, a less efficient fleet, constraints on infrastructure, and operational and regulatory costs have all led to a significant increase in the overall cost of logistics connected to Russia. We must now rush to create a specialized ice-class fleet for the development of transport along the Northern Sea Route and the North–South Transport Corridor. What challenges await Russian maritime logistics in the near future? How can we improve the efficiency of interaction in maritime transport chains? What is the potential for cooperation with transport and logistics companies from the Asia-Pacific, Middle East, and Africa? What are the prospects of building a national fleet?


Moderator:
Mikhail Bazhenov — Partner, Capital Projects & Infrastructure, Debt Advisory Leader, Technologies of Trust

Panellists:
Raj Jit Singh Wallia — Chief Executive Officer, Managing Director of DP World Central Asia
Nikita Gusakov — Chief Executive Officer, EXIAR; Senior Vice President, Russian Export Center
Ekaterina Lyakhova — Director for Business Development, The State Atomic Energy Corporation ROSATOM
Andrey Severilov — Chairman of the Board, FESCO
Sergey Shishkarev — Chairman of the Board of Directors, Delo Group of Companies; Chairman of the Supreme Council, Handball Federation of Russia

12.09.2023
10:00–11:30

Building B, level 6, conference hall 9

Technological Development as a Guarantee of Sovereignty

Advanced Russian Technologies to Ensure Technological Sovereignty and Development of the Far East and the Arctic

In partnership with the State Atomic Energy Corporation Rosatom

For Russia today, ensuring technological sovereignty is of paramount importance, while boosting local industries and expanding the relevant expertise has become a top priority. In this regard, it is crucial to accelerate the development and introduction of advanced Russian technologies that could become a driver for the country’s various industries and regions. The Far East and the Arctic, with their enormous economic potential and unique geographical features, have a special place on the agenda of Russia’s strategic development priorities. The implementation of major investment projects in these regions requires a holistic and interconnected approach that entails reliable sources of electricity, the use of efficient industrial solutions, as well as the integrated development of infrastructure, particularly in logistics. What advanced technologies are most in demand when implementing projects in the Far East and the Arctic? How can we effectively stimulate the development and introduction of Russian technologies in the region? What effect will this have on the development of the Far East and the Arctic?


Moderator:
Dmitry Peskov — Head of Young Professionals Direction, Agency for Strategic Initiatives to Promote New Projects; General Director, Platform of the National Technology Initiative; Special Representative of the President of the Russian Federation on Digital and Technological Development

Panellists:
Konstantin Beirit — President, Seligdar
Anatoliy Bobrakov — Deputy Minister of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Yuriy Korsun — Deputy Chairman, VEB.RF
Denis Kravchenko — Deputy Chairman of the Committee of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation on Economic Policy
Alexey Likhachev — Director General, State Atomic Energy Corporation ROSATOM
Alexander Popov — Vice President, Head of the Trans-Baikal Division, OJSC MMC Norilsk Nickel
Viktor Khmarin — Chairman of the Management Board, General Director, RusHydro

12.09.2023
10:00–11:30

Building B, level 7, conference hall 11

Business Dialogue

Russia – India


New geopolitical realities lend particular importance to relations with reliable partners, which India certainly is. Trade between India and Russia exceeded USD 35 billion in 2022, an increase of 250% over 2021, due primarily to fuel and energy exports. Russia and India continue to discuss ways to diversify and expand co-operation beyond just fuel and energy, and in this context, the Russian Far East is of particular interest to India. Particular emphasis has been placed on the development of an Eastern Maritime Corridor, collaboration on the NSR, and cooperation in promising industries such as shipbuilding, pharmaceuticals, and tourism among others. What is currently preventing a full realization of existing potential? How can trade be increased in a balanced way, more support provided to investment, and cooperation in promising industries and areas further intensified?


Moderator:
Yakov Sergienko — General Director, Yakov & Partners

Panellists:
Raj Prakash Vyas — President of Corporate Affairs, Cadila Pharmaceuticals Limited (online)
Vasily Grudev — Minister of Investment Policy, Government of the Sakhalin Oblast
Pavan Kapoor — Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the Republic of India to the Russian Federation
German Maslov — Vice President of Liner and Logistic Division, FESCO
Ivan Nosov — Chief Manager, Branch of Sberbank in India
Vladimir Panov — Special Representative for the Development of the Arctic, State Atomic Energy Corporation ROSATOM
Shailesh Pathak — Secretary General, Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI) (online)
Somasundaram Subramanian — Surgical Oncologist; Founder, General Director, Eurasian Federation of Oncology (EAFO); Chair, Board of Directors, Eurasian Cancer Research Council (ECRC)
Alexey Chekunkov — Minister of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic (video message)
Alexander Shokhin — President, Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs

Front row participant:
Azer Mamedov — Director of the Investment Department, Russian Direct Investment Fund (RDIF)

12.09.2023
10:00–11:30

Building B, level 7, conference hall 12

The Far East of the Future

Protected Business as a Basis for Sustainable Economic Development


The most important condition for economic growth of a nation is the development of business and production capacities based on domestic technological infrastructure. The state guarantees stability and predictability in regulating these legal relationships.
The tasks of unconditionally implementing all decisions made by the country's leadership to bolster the economy, stimulate entrepreneurial initiatives, and attract investments in various regions and industries are taking centre stage. The Far East and the Arctic serve as key platforms for fostering innovation and industrial potential.
A set of measures has been implemented to support entrepreneurs, including preferential land plot rights, tax incentives, assistance in the implementation of investment projects, a reduction in administrative pressure from auditing structures, and much more. Efforts are currently underway to enhance transport accessibility and establish new logistics chains.
At the same time, the issue of legal protection for conscientious and responsible businesses remains relevant.
What is the role of the prosecution authorities in further shaping a favourable business climate? What additional mechanisms to protect the rights of entrepreneurs will be effective in today's economic realities? How can we build constructive cooperation with foreign partners and ensure the protection of capital investments?


Moderator:
Petr Marchenko — TV and Radio Presenter; Russian Journalist

Panellists:
Alexander Kalinin — President, All‑Russian Non‑Governmental Organization of Small and Medium‑Sized Businesses OPORA RUSSIA
Igor Krasnov — General Prosecutor of the Russian Federation
Svetlana Orlova — Auditor of Accounts Chamber of the Russian Federation
Maksim Reshetnikov — Minister of Economic Development of the Russian Federation
Elina Sidorenko — Doctor of Law, Professor; Director of the Center for Digital Economy and Financial Innovation, MGIMO University
Naree Tantasathien — Attorney General of the Kingdom of Thailand
Boris Titov — Presidential Commissioner of the Russian Federation for the Protection of Entrepreneurs’ Rights
Thi Da Oo — Minister of Legal Affairs, Attorney General of the Republic of the Union of Myanmar
Alexey Chekunkov — Minister of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic

Front row participants:
Ruslan Davydov — Acting Head, Federal Customs Service of the Russian Federation
Alexander Demin — Chairman of the Committee of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation on Small and Medium Enterprises
Alexander Dyomin — Secretary of State - Deputy Head, Federal Service for Ecological, Technological and Nuclear Supervision (Rostekhnadzor)
Sergey Morozov — First Deputy Chairman, Committee of the Russian State Duma on Regional Policy and Local Self-Government
Aleksey Serko — State Secretary – Deputy Minister of the Russian Federation for Civil Defence, Emergencies and Elimination of Consequences of Natural Disasters

12.09.2023
10:00–11:30

Building D, level 5, conference hall 16

The Far East over the Past Decade: What has been a Success and What Remains to be Done?

The World Ocean: Global Opportunities for the Russian Fleet


The development of fishing in the exclusive economic zones of foreign countries and on the high seas using a modern fishing fleet with integrated raw material processing capabilities is one of the main objectives of the industry. In 2022, Russian fishermen harvested about 580 thousand tonnes outside the Russian EEZ – in convention and open waters of the World Ocean (minus 12% compared to the 2021 level). According to industry science, the raw material base of Russian fisheries outside the national exclusive economic zone allows to catch up to 2 million tonnes in the medium term only under existing international treaties. Russia is currently undergoing a large-scale reform of the fishing industry – renewal of the fleet and processing facilities. In this regard, it is important to create conditions for economic interest in using the new Russian fleet in the open waters of the World Ocean. It is obvious that fishing outside Russian waters is a strategically significant and economically promising direction for the development of the Russian fishing industry. Expansion of oceanic fishing, along with geopolitical interest, will help consolidate Russia's status as a leading fishing power. What opportunities does the Russian fishing fleet currently have? Is there any business motivation? What fishing areas are of interest to Russian companies? State support tools (fuel subsidies, subsidizing the construction of krill and tuna boats) – what will really work?


Moderator:
Anton Borisov — Anchor, Russia 24 TV Channel

Panellists:
Andrey Grechkin — General Director, Dalreftrans
Irina Zhachkina — Member of the Board, First Deputy Chairman of the Board, Russian Agricultural Bank
Kirill Kolonchin — Director, The Russian Research Institute of Fisheries and Oceanography (VNIRO)
Ivan Mikhnov — President, Antey Group of Companies
Ilya Shestakov — Head, Federal Agency for Fisheries (Rosrybolovstvo)
Mohamed El Hafedh Ejiwen — Director General, Mauritanian Institute for Oceanographic Research and Fisheries (IMROP) (online)

Front row participant:
Vladimir Solodov — Governor of Kamchatka Territory

12.09.2023
10:00–11:30

Building B, level 6, conference hall 8

Education and Upbringing as the Foundation of Independence

Role and Potential of Civil Society in the Development of the Far East


Together with infrastructure, investment, and natural resources, the creative energy of residents plays a key role in the development of territories. Active citizens, who initiate and implement social, creative, educational, youth, and environmental projects in the Far East, make a huge contribution to the growth of the quality of life and make these regions more attractive. Their activities form a whole branch of the economy – the non-profit sector. The state builds partnership relations with this sector: most regions hold grant competitions for NPOs, preferences are created for businesses implementing projects in this sector, support is provided for scaling up practices and developing competences of project teams. What is the role of civil society institutions in ensuring the advanced development of the Far East? How do the regions measure the social effect of the work of the non-profit sector of the economy? Is the partnership between the state, business, and NPOs equal in rights?


Moderator:
Anton Dolgov — Executive Director, Presidential Grants Foundation

Panellists:
Georgiy Belozerov — Chief Operating Officer, Agency for Strategic Initiatives to Promote New Projects
Roman Karmanov — Chief Executive Officer, Presidential Fund for Cultural Initiatives
Sergey Novikov — Chief of the Presidential Directorate for Social Projects (video message)
Oleg Rakitov — Director-Coordinator of Social and Cultural Programs, VEB.RF
Nikolai Slabzhanin — Executive Director, Russian Committee "Children's Villages - SOS"; Member, Public Council under the Commissioner for the President of the Russian Federation for Children
Alexey Tsydenov — Head of the Republic of Buryatia
Pavel Yasevich — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Kamchatka Territory

Front row participants:
Mikhail Kanavtsev — Head of the Direction Studio of New Media, Russia – the Country of Opportunities
Artem Naumenko — President, Charitable Foundation "We are together"
Elena Spiridonova — Executive Director – Chief of Staff, Russian Bar Association

12.09.2023
10:00–11:30

Building D, level 6, conference hall 19

The Far East over the Past Decade: What has been a Success and What Remains to be Done?

Current Status and Outlook of Hydrogen Transportation Sector Development in Russia: Status, Challenges, and Key Tasks


The rapid development of hydrogen technologies around the world raises a number of questions: from Russia’s need to accelerate to the greatest possible extent in an attempt to catch up and overtake the most successful countries in this area, to Russia’s complete rejection of hydrogen as an inauspicious energy source given its large hydrocarbon reserves. Over the last few years, the demand for hydrogen technologies has increased several times over, and it is not going to stop. One of the most developed areas of using hydrogen globally is hydrogen transportation. Russia is intensively developing hydrogen transportation projects in the Far East. The biggest Russian companies are working on the design and implementation of a comprehensive hydrogen project on Sakhalin Island, as part of which there are plans to build and roll out hydrogen transportation infrastructure for road and rail. With government support, a test site is being created on Sakhalin for the development and trialling of hydrogen technologies. What are the specific features of the Russian hydrogen transportation sector in the Far East? Is there a future for hydrogen transportation in Russia? Which hydrogen transportation projects are being implemented in Russia, and what is the role of the state in this? Are Russian hydrogen transportation technologies developing while there are restrictions on importing technology?


Moderator:
Denis Deryushkin — Chief Executive Officer, National Hydrogen Union

Panellists:
Song Liang — General Director, Gezhouba Russ (online)
Tiancai Ma — Vice Executive Secretary, China Hydrogen Alliance (H2CN) (video message)
Denis Nozdrachev — General Director, InfraVEB
Nikolay Odintsov — Vice President for Corporate Sales Development, Bus Division, GAZ Group Managing Company
Evgeny Pakermanov — President, Rusatom Overseas
Pavel Sorokin — First Deputy Minister of Energy of the Russian Federation

Front row participants:
Vyacheslav Alenkov — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Sakhalin Region
Bogdan Kopasovsky — Director for Government Relations and External Communications, H2Invest

12.09.2023
10:00–11:30

Building D, level 5, conference hall 13

The Far East of the Future

Life of Indigenous Minorities: Preserving Traditions, Developing the Economy, Improving Quality


The Russian State has historically shouldered the responsibility and ensured the preservation of the ancestral habitat, traditional ways of life, and spiritual heritage of the small indigenous minorities in the North, Siberia, and the Far East of the Russian Federation. In this regard, comprehensive measures are being implemented for their ethnocultural development, social support, and the enhancement of life support systems for the most vulnerable groups of these peoples residing in inter-settlements, remote, and inaccessible territories. As a result, unlike many regions around the world, the indigenous populations in our country have maintained their population numbers, settlement systems, self-governance, way of life, culture, languages, and connections with their lands. However, amidst a globalizing world, economic growth, and the consequent transformation of social systems, indigenous populations are confronted with new challenges and threats. In this context, there exists a requirement for a substantial public debate concerning the enhancement of their economic potential, aimed at fortifying their independent livelihood systems. How can we modernize the conditions for conducting traditional economic activities of indigenous peoples? How can we support entrepreneurial endeavours in these areas? How can we incorporate them into the development of creative economy sectors? What are the perceived economic prospects of traditional economic activities, strategies for their expansion, and the role of the state in solving this problem?


Moderator:
Grigory Ledkov

Panellists:
Igor Barinov — Head, Russian Federal Agency for Ethnic Affairs
Maxim Dankin — Director of the Department for the Development of the Arctic Zone of the Russian Federation and the Implementation of Infrastructure Projects, Ministry of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Innokentiy Dementyev — Deputy General Director, Presidential Grants Foundation
Magomedsalam Magomedov — Deputy Chief of the Executive Office of the President of the Russian Federation
Andrey Mondokhonov — Head of the Directorate for the Far Eastern Federal District, General Prosecutor's Office of the Russian Federation
Mikhail Nikiforov — Deputy Prime Minister of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)
Nikolay Kharitonov — Chairman of the Committee on the Development of the Far East and the Arctic, State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation

12.09.2023
10:00–11:30

Building B, level 6, conference hall 7

Technological Development as a Guarantee of Sovereignty

Biosecurity Sovereignty: Fighting Together or Every Man for Himself?


Biosecurity risks are evolving rapidly. Factors such as globalization, economic integration, and the development of synthetic biology and genetic engineering are largely shaping modern epidemic processes. In the current conditions of increased biological threats, it is crucial to have the capabilities required to independently manage the risks posed by epidemics. The countries of the Asia-Pacific region not only have the necessary capacity to manage such risks, but are also actively implementing it, as they rapidly and effectively develop science and technology to combat infectious threats. Russia shares the desire of Asia-Pacific states to build a modern system to counter biological threats. Russia has been implementing joint cooperation projects with China, Vietnam, and Mongolia for several years, and is currently developing cooperation with its partners from Thailand and Myanmar. What are some of the strategic areas of cooperation that will help respond to the constantly changing challenges of various infections? What are the main components of biological sovereignty? What are the specialized agencies of Asia-Pacific countries focusing on in particular to develop their own capacity to combat epidemics? How can we ensure that Russia remains independent of external assistance in matters concerning biosecurity?


Moderator:
Anna Popova — Head of the Federal Service for Surveillance on Consumer Rights Protection and Human Wellbeing – Chief State Sanitary Physician of the Russian Federation

Panellists:
Sergey Balakhonov — Director, Irkutsk Research Anti-Plague Institute of Siberia and the Far East
Andrey Kuznetsov — General Co-Director, Joint Russian-Vietnamese Tropical Research and Technology Center (Tropical Center) (online)
Andrey Rudenko — Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation
Tatiana Stepanova — Director, Tyumen Research Institute of Regional Infectious Pathology
Zsuzsanna Jakab — Acting Regional Director for the Western Pacific, World Health Organization (online)
Irina Yarovaya — Deputy Chairman of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation

Front row participants:
Pornchai Danvivathana — Secretary General, Asia Cooperation Dialogue (ACD)
Kirill Kaem — Senior Vice-President for Innovations, Skolkovo Foundation
Olga Trotsenko — Director, Khabarovsk Research Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology
Mikhail Shchelkanov — Director, Research Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology named after G.P. Somov

12.09.2023
10:00–11:30

Building D, level 6, conference hall 17

Russia – Philippines


As part of the 7th Eastern Economic Forum in 2022, a friendship and cooperation agreement was signed between Vladivostok and the Philippine city of Cebu at the Administration of Vladivostok. The document was signed by the cities’ mayors, Konstantin Shestakov and Michael Lopez Rama, in a virtual ceremony. “There is more than three thousand kilometres between us, but distance means very little when it comes to friendship,” Konstantin Shestakov, Mayor of Vladivostok, said in welcoming the guests. “We are keen to establish stable ties between our cities in the most varied of fields, from socio-cultural to economic. We can organize exchanges for children’s and student delegations, joint sports and cultural events, and all manner of master classes, especially given the opportunities afforded by modern information technology, thanks to which we have been able to sign our agreement virtually.” The Mayor of Vladivostok added that this year marks 46 years since diplomatic relations were established between the Russian Federation and the Republic of the Philippines. Russian–Philippine relations nowadays hold potential for deepening multifaceted engagement. In turn, Cebu Mayor Michael Lopez Rama expressed confidence that joint efforts would take cooperation to a whole new level, and that the agreement would facilitate the implementation of joint projects in different areas. What are the priorities in terms of deepening cooperation between regional hubs? What is needed to create a sustainable infrastructure? Which elements of this infrastructure are of primary importance for economic operators in both cities? What needs to be done to increase supply chains, develop digital infrastructure and incrase engagements between regional and provincial relations?


Moderator:
Daniyar Akkaziev — Executive Director, Russia-ASEAN Business Council

Panellists:
Igor Bailen — Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the Republic of the Philippines to the Russian Federation
Vadim Vetolskiy — Consul ad Honorem of the Philippines in Vladivostok
Armi Lopez Garcia — 5. Consul Armi Lopez Garcia Consul ad Honorem of the Russian Federation in Cebu
Michael Lopez Rama — Mayor of the City of Cebu, Republic of the Philippines
Vyacheslav Manuilov — Deputy Head of the Department of Foreign Economic and International Relations, Moscow Government
Joy Pesquera — Chairperson – Cebu City Tourism
Ivan Polyakov — Chairman, Russia–ASEAN Business Council

12.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building D, level 6, conference hall 17

The Far East of the Future

Territorial Planning in the Health Care System


The public’s satisfaction with the healthcare system is one of the key indicators of how well a society lives. An assessment of this system based on the actual availability and quality of medical care provides an understanding of the effectiveness of the efforts made by the government and society to improve it. An effective healthcare system is based on the approach that is taken to develop primary healthcare, which ensures that better health indicators are achieved at a lower cost and reduces the negative impact of economic hardship on people’s health. This approach is based on proper territorial planning in healthcare, which primarily aims to create conditions for the harmonious development of the healthcare system, ensure the wide availability of medical care, and improve the efficiency of medical services. The scope, type, and quality of such services must correspond to the morbidity level and needs of the entire population. To achieve this ambitious task, improvements need to be made to the healthcare system depending on the specific features of each region, in particular, their territory, geographical and climatic conditions, population density, transport accessibility of healthcare organizations, and the level and general structure of morbidity. What role does territorial planning play in the accessibility of medical care? How can we properly manage resources and correctly plan the location of medical infrastructure facilities? What data is needed and which government bodies need to participate in creating an optimal system to provide medical care to the population?


Moderator:
Olga Kobyakova — Director, Federal Research Institute for Health Organization and Informatics of Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation

Panellists:
Elena Drozdova — Acting Deputy Governor; Head, Department of Health of the Chukotka Autonomous District
Elena Zhidkova — Head of the Clinics Network, Russian Railways-Medicine – A Branch of Russian Railways; General Director, Russian Railways-Medicine
Victor Ushakov — Executive Director, Health Industry Center of Sberbank
Victor Fisenko — First Deputy Minister of Health of the Russian Federation
Anastasia Khudchenko — Deputy Head of Primorye Territory Administration, Ministry of Health of Primorye Territory
Vladimir Yuschuk — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Sakhalin Region

12.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building B, level 6, conference hall 6

International Cooperation in a Changed World

EAEU and BRICS: Role in Shaping a New Multipolar World


Profound and fundamental changes are taking place in the global arena. More and more countries are in favour of building a new and fairer architecture of international relations. The key role in this process can be played by international associations, where progressive initiatives and projects to promote the development of economic relations take shape, in which all stakeholders have a voice. The Eurasian Economic Union is the world’s largest integration association in terms of the territory it covers. The Union is developing at pace, achieving high rates of industrial and agricultural production and establishing an open dialogue with its foreign partners. BRICS, as a unique format of inter-state cooperation, is of particular interest to rapidly developing economies. The share of GDP of the BRICS countries currently stands at 26 per cent, with purchasing power parity at 31.5 per cent, compared to 30 per cent for the G7 countries. More than 20 countries have expressed their desire to join BRICS, including Belarus and Kazakhstan, member states of the Eurasian Economic Union. There is a great scope for expanding cooperation between EAEU and BRICS countries both in Eurasia and globally. What mechanisms are needed to build EAEU–BRICS relations and facilitate the creation of a new multipolar order? How will combining the potential of the EAEU and BRICS contribute to the development of an independent infrastructure for the monetary and financial market? What is the role of the EAEU and BRICS development institutions in this process? What are the opportunities and preconditions for creating the transport and logistics framework of the macroregion through the development of the modern intermodal logistics solutions and transport corridors? What is the potential for cooperation in the digital economy and innovative technologies? Is business interested in creating joint projects in the EAEU and BRICS countries?


Moderator:
Ksenia Komissarova — Chief Editor, TV BRICS International Media Network

Panellists:
Sammy Kotwani — President, Indian Business Alliance (IBA)
Dmitry Krutoy — Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Ambassador of the Republic of Belarus to the Russian Federation
Mikhail Myasnikovich — Chairman of the Board, Eurasian Economic Commission
Alexey Overchuk — Deputy Prime Minister of the Russian Federation
Sergey Pavlov — First Deputy Managing Director, Russian Railways
Vladimir Padalko — Vice President, Chamber of Commerce and Industry of the Russian Federation

Front row participants:
Dmitry Volvach — Deputy Minister of Economic Development of the Russian Federation (online)
Danil Ibraev — President, Kyrgyz Union of Manufactures and Entrepreneurs
Sergey Storchak — Senior Banker, VEB.RF
He Zhenwei — Chairman, China Overseas Development Association

12.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building B, level 6, conference hall 9

The Far East over the Past Decade: What has been a Success and What Remains to be Done?

Siberia's Role in Turning East: How to Use the Far East Experience?


Today, Siberia has a special role to play – to become the main driver of Russia's economic development in the new environment. The strategy for socio-economic development of the Siberian Federal District, approved in early 2023, sets ambitious goals to turn Siberia into an accelerated centre of economic growth and a stronghold of the "the pivot to the East". However, Siberia is inextricably linked to the Far East, and the latter one has already accumulated impressive experience in managing the development of a separate macro-region. How to use the experience of the Far East in organizing the management of Siberia's development? Perhaps, it is the creation of the Siberia Development Corporation that will give impetus to the beginning of major changes in the macro-region and will allow financial, managerial, scientific, and socio-cultural tools to be effectively channelled towards growth. What other management know-how can be used, taking into account the successful examples of other regions? What global practices will help achieve the strategy's goals and, at the same time, increase the volume of added value produced, improve the living standards of the population, create a powerful logistics base and, at the same time, a creative economy centre in Siberia? How to integrate the territorial strategies of Siberia, the Far East, and the European part of Russia? What could be a synergy effect from the synchronization of macro-regional strategies? How to turn Siberia into a region attractive for the young, creative, and purposeful to live and work? What does the Far East have to offer in this direction?


Moderator:
Anton Sviridenko — Executive Director, Stolypin Institute for the Economy of Growth

Panellists:
Elena Bezdenezhnykh
Petr Ivanov — Sociologist, Civil Engineering Laboratory; Author, Editor, Telegram channel "Urbanism as the meaning of life"
Andrey Klepach — Chief Economist, VEB.RF
Evgeny Kogan — Professor, National Research University Higher School of Economics
Yakov Sergienko — General Director, Yakov & Partners
Boris Titov — Presidential Commissioner of the Russian Federation for the Protection of Entrepreneurs’ Rights
Alexander Uss

Front row participant:
Mikhail Sutyaginskiy — Chairman of the Board of Directors, Titan Group of Companies

12.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building B, level 7, conference hall 11

The Logistics of Change

Rail Logistics in a New Age: Realities, Challenges, and Opportunities


Russia’s domestic transport and logistics industry is currently developing in a new economic reality. Export and import cargo flows have shifted from west to east, new logistics routes are emerging, and projects to modernize the infrastructure of international transport corridors have gained momentum. Despite the infrastructural constraints, container transportation is rapidly developing and growing in volume with each passing year. Container operators’ investments in the development of transport and logistics centres and sea terminals directly impact the GRP of Russia’s regions, in particular, the Primorye Territory. What role does container transportation play in a country’s socioeconomic development and who is competing with whom on the railways today? How developed is the domestic railway and port infrastructure? How have transport and logistics flows changed and what new international routes have emerged? How do foreign partners assess the potential for cooperation with Russia?


Moderator:
Marianna Ozhereleva — TV presenter; Deputy Executive Director for Public Relations, ESP

Panellists:
Alexey Vladimirov — General Director, Astafiev Terminal
Khasyan Zyabirov — General Director, UgolTrans
Alexander Kakhidze — General Director, FinInvest
Igor Levitin — Aide to the President of the Russian Federation; Secretary, State Council of the Russian Federation
Valeriy Prokopchuk — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Primorsky Territory
Mya Tun Oo — Deputy Prime Minister, Union Minister for Transport and Communications of the Republic of the Union of Myanmar
Aleksey Shilo — Deputy Managing Director, Head, Centre for Corporate Transport Services (CFTO), Russian Railways
Andrey Shpilenko — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Omsk Region, representative of the Omsk Region under the Government of the Russian Federation

Front row participants:
Shamil Baishev — Co-founder, Smart Container
Vladimir Buzanov — Director, VSCT
Vladimir Burovtsev — Rector, Far Eastern State Transport University
Aleksey Gradov — First Deputy General Director, New Land Grain Corridor
Vyacheslav Kvon — Head of Artemovsky Urban Okrug
Mikhail Khardikov — Operations Director, En+ Group

12.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building A, level 5, conference hall 4

The Logistics of Change

A Consolidated Airline for the Far East: Spreading Our Wings


The Unified Far Eastern Airline is a large-scale project aimed at ensuring the Far East can be accessed by air, improving the quality of life of those living in the Far East, making the region more attractive to investors, and accelerating social and economic development there. What changes must be made to the regulation of air travel to hard-to-reach settlements to help accelerate the development of infrastructure on the ground and the network of routes crossing the Far Eastern Federal District? What has already been accomplished in three and a half years building a unified Far Eastern airline and what problem-solving mechanisms do the project participants – regional authorities and Aurora Airlines - foresee? What has the airline already done to drive growth and what more needs to be done in the coming years? What developments from aircraft manufacturers and new domestically produced aircraft already satisfy the objectives of the aviation industry in the Far Eastern Federal District, and what has yet to be developed, what difficulties still need to be overcome? What are the prospects for new aircraft deliveries to a unified Far Eastern airline? To what extent do the economic and technical indicators of the new equipment serve for the resolution of the tasks aviators face? How should we go about training flight personnel for new domestic aircraft and a whole new generation of aviators in the Far Eastern Federal District? How can we make sure the infrastructure on the ground matches the scale of the tasks facing the unified Far Eastern airline?


Moderator:
Mikhail Kuznetsov — Director, Eastern State Planning Center (FANU Vostokgosplan)

Panellists:
Alexander Averkiev — Head of the Airport Operations Department, Federal Agency for Air Transport
Anatoliy Bobrakov — Deputy Minister of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Oleg Bocharov — Deputy Minister of Industry and Trade of the Russian Federation
Pavel Simigin — Member of the Committee of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federationon for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Konstantin Sukhorebrik — General Director, Aurora Airlines

Front row participants:
Yakov Dalinger — Vice-Rector, Russian University of Transport (MIIT)
Vladimir Sivtsev — Minister of Transport of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)
Evgeny Terentiev — Director of the Institute of Education, National Research University Higher School of Economics

12.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building B, level 5, conference hall 5

Business Dialogue

Russia – China


Trade between Russia and China increased by 40.6% in the first half of 2023 compared to the same period of 2022, amounting to USD 114.5 billion, even as settlements in national currencies continue to grow steadily. The important geographical location and economic potential of the Far East have Russia and China actively working to improve cooperation models and programmes. Joint prosperity and development in the macro-region depend more and more on the interaction and exchange of information, technology, and experience between the state and business. How can the high level of trust that exists between the leaders of Russia and China be used to further develop cooperation in trade and investment to the mutual benefit of the two countries? How can new opportunities be fully unlocked in logistics and finance among other areas to help diversify and optimize trade and economic interaction between Russia and China? Are additional measures needed to improve the business environment and increase bilateral cooperation in production and investment and the transfer of innovations in the Russian Far East (e.g., as part of the ASEZ, bonded zone preferences, and so forth)?


Moderators:
Zhou Liqun
Alexey Maslov — Director, Institute of Asian and African Studies, Lomonosov Moscow State University

Panellists:
Mikhail Volkov — General Director, Chairman of the Board, Russian Post
Qian Wei — Director General of the Strategic Planning Department, Baowu Resources Co., Ltd.
Chen Guoping — Executive Vice President, State Grid Corporation of China
Vitaly Evdokimenko — President, TransContainer
Alexander Zainigabdinov — Head of the Beijing office of China Window Consulting Group, arbitrator of the Shanghai International Arbitration Center
Pavel Zarkov — Director of Investments and Development, Sodrugestvo Management Company
Alexander Kalinin — President, All‑Russian Non‑Governmental Organization of Small and Medium‑Sized Businesses OPORA RUSSIA
Sergey Lebedev — Vice President of Government Relations, AliExpress Russia
Liu Xuesong — Plenipotentiary Minister, Embassy of the People`s Republic of China in the Russian Federation
Alexey Chekunkov — Minister of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic (video message)
Hu Zhirong — Chairman of the Board, Kai Xin Rong Group Co Ltd
Chen Zhong — Deputy General Manager, China Communications Construction Group Co., Ltd.
Han Shengjian — Vice Governor, People's Government of Heilongjiang Province
Huang Yongzhang — President, PetroChina Company Limited

12.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building D, level 5, conference hall 13

The Far East over the Past Decade: What has been a Success and What Remains to be Done?

Infrastructure: The Nervous System of the Far East


The most important prospective task in the development of the Far East is to create the infrastructure necessary to ensure sustainable growth can take place and investment projects can be implemented effectively. There continues to be a lack of infrastructure in the region, and it is needed for transport and logistics, engineering, and the construction of social facilities. A significant portion of the infrastructure built in the Far Eastern Federal District uses financial support from the state, public-private partnerships, concessions, and project financing. What infrastructure is needed to sustain development? What support tools are needed to accelerate the construction of the necessary infrastructure? What mechanisms and instruments of support are the most effective and most sought after by investors at present? How can existing measures be effectively combined?


Moderator:
Natalya Trunova — Auditor, Accounts Chamber of the Russian Federation

Panellists:
Alexander Aksakov — Director of Infrastructure Bonds Division, DOM.RF
Lev Gorilovskiy — President, Polyplastic Group
Gadzhimagomed Guseynov — First Deputy Minister of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Sergei Ivanov — Special Representative of the President of the Russian Federation on Environmental Protection, Ecology and Transport
Nikita Stasishin — Deputy Minister of Construction, Housing and Utilities of the Russian Federation
Valery Tsivilev — General Director, Coal Mining Company “Kolmar”
Mikhail Yurchuk — Deputy CEO for Government Relations, Atlas Mining

Front row participants:
Georgy Fotin — General Director, GDK Baimskaya
Evgeniy Chekin — Chairman of the Government of of Kamchatka Territory
Yuliya Shabala — Deputy General Director for Sustainable Development and Corporate Affairs, Udokan Copper

12.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building D, level 6, conference hall 20

The Far East of the Future

The Phenomenon of Russian Film: National Cinema as an Engine of the Regional Economy


Every year, the regions are demonstrating their potential in the filmmaking industry to an increasing extent, and the interest of Moscow directors and foreign film companies in shooting in regional locations only proves this. Today, in addition to its information, ideological, and entertainment functions, cinema is more and more commonly seen as a driver of regional economic growth. The tax rebate system attracts investment and creates new jobs, while the organization of filming locations and the creation of film production infrastructure requires financial investment from outside and helps to improve the region’s economy. By 2023, 36 constituent territories of the Russian Federation have film committees that assist film companies, and 14 regions have financial support programmes in place in the form of reimbursement of a portion of costs, totalling approximately RUB 500 million. As well as economic benefits, the development of film production creates a distinctive cultural environment in the regions: according to the Russian Ministry of Culture, more than 387 regional film festivals are held annually in 75 regions of Russia, during which meetings with audiences are held and educational venues, film schools, and film labs are set up. There are 684 film clubs in 43 regions. With the appropriate support and investment, regional cinema can become a powerful economic engine and an incentive to develop local cultural industries and tourism. What does boosting cinema in the regions bring them, and why should regional budget funds be invested in this? How has the creation of film commissions influenced changes in the cinematographic climate in the regions? What is the right way to unlock the cinematographic potential of the regions and attract domestic and foreign film crews? What are the prospects for creating a film cluster in the Far East? Should we try to attract professionals from Moscow and St. Petersburg, or is it better to grow our own locally? How does one make national cinema and find one’s audience? What are the key areas for developing filmmaking in the region which will be provided with financial support: independent films, festival films, children’s and animated films, or screen adaptations?


Moderator:
Roman Karmanov — Chief Executive Officer, Presidential Fund for Cultural Initiatives

Panellists:
Philip Abryutin — Artistic Director, Golden Raven International Arctic Film Festival
Julia Lipatova — General Producer, HOUMPRODUCTION
Dmitry Makhonin — Governor of Perm Territory
Evgeniy Melentyev — Chief Executive Officer, KINODANZ
Aisen Nikolaev — Head of Sakha Republic (Yakutia)
Elvira Nurgalieva — Deputy Minister of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Far East and the Arctic
Alexey Romanov — Artistic Director, Autonomous Institution of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) State Oil Company "Sakhafilm"
Dmitry Shevtsov — General Director, Vladivostok Film Studio
Fedor Scherbakov — General Director, Lenfilm Film Studio
Dmitry Yakunin — Deputy Executive Director, Regional Cinema Support Fund (FPRK)

12.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building B, level 6, conference hall 8

Technological Development as a Guarantee of Sovereignty

Technologies of the Future: Any Room for Love?


Modern technologies are being dynamically introduced into everyday life. The volume of investments in future technologies is increasing, and states are adopting national strategies and programmes for developing them. Adoption of technologies and the launch of pilot projects ‘on the ground’ is becoming critical. Technology companies are in constant search of industrial and regional partners. One of the key points of growth has become the Far East, where numerous initiatives to develop the territory are being put into action. Are the regions ready for a technological boom? Can technology steer them down the wrong path? And will there be room for people and human relationships?


Moderator:
Ruslan Yunusov — Co-founder, Russian Quantum Center

Panellists:
Konstantin Abramov — General Director, All-Russian Public Opinion Research Center Foundation (VTsIOM); Chairman, Public Council under the Ministry of Labor and Social Protection of the Russian Federation
Anatoly Wasserman — Deputy of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation
Alexey Likhachev — Director General, State Atomic Energy Corporation ROSATOM
Alena Mastiukova — Research Fellow, Laboratory of Quantum Information Technologies, National University of Science and Technology MISiS
Natalya Popova — First Deputy General Director, Innopraktika
Ilya Semerikov — Researcher at the Laboratory "Optics of Complex Quantum Systems", Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences
Hailong Xue — Executive President, Xuanyuan Group Industrial Development

Front row participant:
Igor Drozdov — Chairman of the Board, Skolkovo Foundation

12.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building D, level 6, conference hall 19

The Far East of the Future

Crystal of Growth: How to Accelerate Advanced Development in the Far East


In the current economic environment, the key challenge is the need to transition to a supply-side economy and intensify investment processes. The key problem identified by business is the lack of sufficient ‘long’ credit resources in the economy at a reasonable rate. The size of loans that are provided with state support or by state development institutions are insufficient and scarce. Due to internal and external factors, there are particular motivations in Russia for reconsidering the key role of the state in the economy. Using our historical experience, as well as the experience of leading economies, we may try to move away from the existing restrictions and prohibitions and, using the example of pilot projects, test the creation of a series of industrial investment production facilities in the Far East through targeted project emissions. Today we have prepared a draft and the main parameters of the Far East Industrial Development Programme, which will entail the launch of an investment cycle for the Far East. Which new and forgotten old ways and mechanisms will make it possible to stimulate investment processes? Which industrial projects and areas of activity are suitable for financing using targeted project emissions? What are the effects, and the possible risks and ways to reduce them when targeted project emissions are put into action?


Moderator:
Alexander Galushka — Vice President, Civic Chamber of the Russian Federation

Panellists:
Roman Berdnikov — First Deputy General Director, Member of the Management Board, RusHydro
Pavel Volkov — State Secretary – Deputy Minister for the Development of the Russian Far East and the Arctic
Artur Niyazmetov — Deputy Presidential Plenipotentiary Envoy to the Central Federal District
Vladimir Novikov — Member of the Board of Directors, General Director, VEB Engineering
Alexander Osipov — Governor of Trans-Baikal Territory

Front row participants:
Dmitriy Zaytsev — Auditor, Accounts Chamber of the Russian Federation
Andrey Klepach — Chief Economist, VEB.RF
Alexander Krutikov — Managing Partner, Agency Invest Rus
Ivan Kutsevlyak — Deputy Governor of the Chelyabinsk Region

12.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building A, level 3, conference hall 2

The Far East of the Future

Human Resources for Industry in the Far East: System and Prospects


Human resources for industry in the Far East are a key factor for the region's development. The panel discussion will focus on the system of personnel training for employment in the Far East's industrial sector and its future prospects. Participants will discuss the current situation in HR, the problems faced by industrial companies, and potential ways to develop and improve the system of education and training to the benefit of industry. What measures can be taken to reduce the gap between the needs of the labour market and training? What practices are most effective in attracting and retaining talented specialists in the Far East?


Moderator:
Victoria Shubochkina — Chief Executive Officer, Excellence Expert

Panellists:
Aleksandr Vaino — Head of Youth Initiatives Center, Agency of Strategic Initiatives (ASI)
Andrey Vinyukov — First Deputy General Director, Coal Mining Company “Kolmar”
Fedor Kirsanov — General Director, Atlas Mining
Vera Podguzova — Senior Vice President, Director of External Relations Directorate, Promsvyazbank
Alexander Popov — Vice President, Head of the Trans-Baikal Division, OJSC MMC Norilsk Nickel
Denis Sekirinsky — Deputy Minister of Science and Higher Education of the Russian Federation

Front row participant:
Alexey Agafonov — Deputy Director, Russia – Land of Opportunity

12.09.2023
12:30–14:00

Building B, level 6, conference hall 7

The Far East of the Future

Sustainable Development of Small and Medium-Sized Cities: Developing Business and Government Cooperation


Improving the quality of life in cities with populations of up to 100,000 people is a strategic priority for the state, as one in every six Russian citizens resides in them. Sustainable development of small and medium-sized cities depends, to a large extent, on productive dialogue and cooperation between local authorities and companies that oversee 'city-forming' enterprises. The largest employers are indeed interested in improving the quality of life in the regions where they operate, considering this to be one of the goals of their own sustainable development strategies. They implement long-term social investment programmes in their "territories of responsibility" and seek to improve the efficiency of managing these investments. At the same time, such programmes are subject to a certain inertia arising due to tradition. In the current conditions, the issue of prompt synchronization between businesses and municipalities regarding priorities in the selection of investment projects takes centre stage. Synchronization will be genuinely effective only when there is objective and promptly updated data on the current state and dynamics of changes in the quality of life in specific cities, as well as data on the experiences of other regions where significant positive changes have already become possible due to productive interaction between business and government. How can businesses and governments harmonize approaches to determining areas of socially responsib