11.09.2018
10:00—11:30

Building D, level 6, Conference hall 17

Improving Living Conditions

Redefining Education for the Global Workforce of Tomorrow

As the global economy rapidly evolves, driven by disruptive technologies, education systems face hitherto unseen challenges. Today, the interdependence of man and machine has blurred the lines between the digital, physical, and biological spheres. And while technologies give rise to innovations, they do not promise progress per se. The spread of artificial intelligence and machine learning could leave millions of people unemployed, and disrupt existing social and economic patterns. As a result, the younger generation is at risk of entering a marketplace where the skills gap is worse than at any time before in history. While public and private investments in education aim to improve human capital, new and better approaches to teaching are also needed to provide the skills required to develop the workforce of the future. What is being done to prepare subsequent generations for an uncertain and volatile future? Are current education systems teaching the skills required to close the skills gap in an automated world? What would prompt governments to reconsider the value of education?


Moderator:
Brian Yeung — Editor, Asia Weekly

Panellist:
Charles Yidan Chen — Founder, Yidan Prize Foundation; Core Founder, Tencent Holdings Limited

11.09.2018
12:30—14:00

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 6

Improving Living Conditions

The Future of the Labour Market in the Far East: New Strategies for Employers

By 2025, the Russian Far East will have a total of more than 100,000 modern, high-performance jobs. It will be impossible to fill these positions using only the Far East's existing workforce, however. The government has proposed a programme to attract specialists from other regions; nonetheless, the scale and conditions of these proposals are indicative of the need to adopt new measures aimed at attracting staff and creating a new system to train and retrain specialists in accordance with employers’ requirements. How can we develop a strategy to improve the workforce potential of the Far East? How do we effectively develop and invest in human capital? How do we solve the problems that investors encounter when trying to attract qualified staff that are able to meet the needs of new industries?


Moderator:
Alexey Bobrovsky — Head of the Economic Programme, Russia 24 TV Channel

Panellists:
Nikita Anisimov — Rector, Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU)
Maxim Basov — Chief Executive Officer, Rusagro Group of Companies
Vsevolod Vukolov — Head, Federal Service for Labour and Employment (Rostrud)
Mikhail Karisalov — Chairman of the Management Board, Chief Executive Officer, SIBUR
Alexander Kozlov — Minister for the Development of the Russian Far East
Irina Manuylova — Acting Vice Governor of Primorye Territory
Robert Urazov — Chief Executive Officer, Agency for the Development of Professional Communities and Skilled Workers (WorldSkills Russia)
Svetlana Chupsheva — Chief Executive Officer, Agency for Strategic Initiatives
Irina Yarovaya — Deputy Chairman of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation

Front row participants:
Elena Grekhova — Head of the Project Learning to Drive Disabled People of 1 and 2 Groups, Sport Federation of Persons with Musculoskeletal Injuries in Primorsky Territory (regional public organization)
Andrey Leifa — Acting Rector, Amur State University

11.09.2018
12:30—14:00

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 8

Improving Living Conditions

Information Infrastructure as a Driver of Rapid Economic Development in the Far East

In partnership with MegaFon

Information infrastructure creates opportunities for the development of telemedicine, distance learning, smart energy, and digital utilities, as well as other sectors which promote growth in the digital economy. The government is set to approve a national plan to develop the country’s information infrastructure, which should help to drive growth in these sectors. On the other hand, according to the Ministry for the Development of the Russian Far East, one in ten residents of the region still lacks access to broadband Internet and a reliable mobile connection. This is slowing the development of the high-tech sector in the region, and postponing the creation of a fully-fledged information infrastructure and transition to a digital economy. The most important task in delivering high-quality social services is providing access to a network of educational institutions and healthcare facilities, and in order to maintain road safety and a fast response to emergencies, especially in winter, it is vital that stable mobile communications services are accessible on federal and regional highways. How can business be persuaded to develop the information infrastructure as a whole? What special considerations should be taken into account in the development of the digital economy in the Far East? Which economic, technological, and regulatory barriers to development can be solved with the help of state support? Is there a role for investment support measures here? What opportunities could a stable high-speed connection provide for the expansion of the innovation sector in the Far East? Which solutions would improve the quality of life in the region?


Moderator:
Vladislav Boutenko — Senior Partner, Managing Director, Chairman in Russia, The Boston Consulting Group

Panellists:
Vasily Brovko — Director for Special Commissions, Russian Technologies State Corporation (Rostec)
Amy Lin — Senior Vice President, Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd.
Vladislav Onishchenko — Head, Analytical Centre for the Government of the Russian Federation
Mikhail Oseevskiy — President, Rostelecom
Anna Serebryanikova — Chief Operating Officer, MegaFon

Front row participants:
Sergey Nosov — Acting Governor of Magadan Region
Vladimir Solodov — Acting Chairman of the Government of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)
Zhu Xian — Vice President, Chief Operations Officer, New Development Bank

11.09.2018
12:30—14:00

Building B, level 7, Conference hall 4

Improving Living Conditions

The Forces Driving Change in Society: How to Create Effective Social Communication

Without the cooperation of businesses, charities, and social and volunteer organizations, it is impossible to address the challenges that our society faces today. It is these groups that are the source of innovation, and from which many bold and creative ideas and solutions originate. Modern communications techniques are needed to ensure that information about new ideas and approaches to social issues can reach a wide audience. These techniques may, in turn, become a tool for creating and promoting community values and lead to more people becoming involved in addressing social issues. Effective means of communication can be developed if the efforts of both new contributors and recognized experts in this field are combined. What types of technology can be used to communicate social ideas effectively, and are there any successful examples to be found in Russia? What best international practices can be introduced in Russia? Who might be the key players in the process of setting up these new means of social communication? What measures and initiatives need to be introduced?


Moderator:
Sophie Shevardnadze — Journalist, Anchor

Panellists:
Felix Azhimov — Director for Expertise and Analytics, Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU)
Anna Akparova — Aide to Deputy Prime Minister of Russian Federation and Presidential Envoy to the Far Eastern Federal District Y. Trutnev
Alexander Alekseev — President, Art Directors Club Russia; Creative Director, Serviceplan
Sergey Glushkov — Vice President Corporate Affairs, PepsiCo Russia, CIS, Ukraine & Central Europe
Yuri Grishan — Mayor of Magadan
Anton Dolgov — Executive Director, Presidential Grants Foundation
Ian Colebourne — Chief Executive Officer, Deloitte CIS
Alexey Malinovskiy — Сhief Executive Officer in Russia, Mastercard
Yuliana Slashcheva — Chairman of the Management Board, Creative Production Association Soyuzmultfilm Film Studio FSUE
Ekaterina Son — General Director, Effie Awards Russia

11.09.2018
17:15—18:45

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 7

Improving Living Conditions

The Far East and Sci-tech Progress. What’s the Strategy?

The concept of sci-tech progress encompasses the joint development of both science and technology, the invention and spread of new technologies, and new scientific discoveries. Progress in any one area is closely linked to all others: social development helps nurture new forward-thinking minds that will go on to enrich various industries, which then facilitates the creation of new opportunities for satisfying material demands. Sci-tech progress is highly influenced by the economy: researchers fear that developments in certain areas of science and even medicine will stall because they’re not economically profitable. For example, medicines for rare diseases might not make it to the necessary experimental and trial stages because of the high costs and low profits involved. In the last 200 years, progress has moved swiftly, ever accelerating, driving breath-taking social developments while also depleting the planet’s resources. The nine federal subjects that make up the Russian Far East account for almost 40% of the country’s territory, but only 5% of the population lives on these approximately six thousand square kilometres. The population density of the Russian Far East is 40 times smaller than in the European part of Russia. How can the Russian Far East be made even more appealing? Where should the priorities lie: in improving the region’s standards of living or in large energy and infrastructure projects? Can the Russian Far East become attractive and competitive while keeping up with its foreign neighbours when it comes to the implementation of large sci-tech projects?


Moderator:
Leonid Altukhov — President, Group of Companies Netkom-IPC

Panellists:
Marat Biktimirov — General Director, E-Arena National Association of Research and Educational e-Infrastructures
Riccardo Valentini — Nobel Peace Prize Laureate; Member of the Board of Directors, CMCC (Euro-Mediterranean Centre on Climate Change); Professor, University of Tuscia
Pavel Grachev — Chief Executive Officer, Polyus
Alexander Sergeev — President, Russian Academy of Sciences

11.09.2018
17:15—18:45

Building D, level 6, Conference hall 18

Improving Living Conditions

Parents, Children, and Changing Technology: The Limits of Control and Potential for Development

The world our children are growing up in is changing significantly faster than it did in decades past. Developments in IT, cyberspace, and electronic payment systems are emerging so quickly that children are starting to master them faster than their parents are able to. This can lead to two possible outcomes: either parents place unreasonable restrictions on their children, who can easily find ways around them, or children have unrestricted access to information which may be harmful to them. How can we protect children without inhibiting their development of the skills they clearly need to be successful in our contemporary world? How can we harness the enthusiasm of today’s children for smartphones, computers, and other gadgets and turn it to their benefit? What approaches have forward-thinking parents and society already developed to tackle this issue?


Moderator:
Sophie Shevardnadze — Journalist, Anchor

Panellists:
Aleksandra Altuhova — Director of Special Solution Division, Sberbank
Marina Borovskaya — Deputy Minister of Science and Higher Education of the Russian Federation
Alexander Borodich — Founder, Universa Blockchain Platform; Founder, Child Tech
Tatyana Mineeva — Vice President, Committee for Ecology, Delovaya Rossiya (Business Russia); Chairman, Public Council at the Department of Education of Moscow
Dmitry Peskov — Special Representative of the President of the Russian Federation on Digital and Technological Development; Director of the Young Professionals direction, Agency for Strategic Initiatives
Marina Rakova — Chief Executive Officer, Russian Foundation for Educational Development
Aleksey Sokolov — Deputy Minister of Digital Development, Communications and Mass Media of the Russian Federation
Svetlana Tarasenko — Member of the Organizing Committee, Children of Primorye Social Project

12.09.2018
09:30—11:00

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 2

Sberbank Panel Session

Improving Living Conditions

Education in Transitional World: New Priorities

Exponential technological development across all industries is changing the economy and human relations, blurring distinctions between the real and the virtual. We are making rapid strides toward a world where artificial intelligence, bio- and nanotechnology are just as commonplace as smartphones have been these past 10 years. Keeping up with the pace of changes in a transitional world is a challenge. As is usually the case in times of dramatic transformations, it is the young who prove to be better at adjusting to the new reality, more tech-savvy and successful in their careers. They become “guides” for older people in the new world. The prestige of “digital professions” and the benefits of education are becoming increasingly pronounced year after year. Training is more and more personalized. What is the ideal model of a university that helps to unleash a student’s “digital potential”? Digital skills are universal, and they often replace traditional ones instead of complementing them. Many educational resources and technologies are free of charge. That said, the overabundance of information encourages mosaic thinking and substitutes real education with an illusion of knowledge. How should the educational system adjust to the global digitalization? What skills and knowledge will still be relevant in 10-20 year?


Moderator:
Herman Gref — Chief Executive Officer, Chairman of the Executive Board, Sberbank

Panellists:
Marina Borovskaya — Deputy Minister of Science and Higher Education of the Russian Federation
Valeria Zabolotnaya — Managing Director, School 21
Ivan Kolomoyets — Chief Executive Director, Co-Founder, Uchi.ru
Pyotr Polozhevets — Editor-in-Chief, Uchitelskaya Gazeta (Teachers’ Gazette), an Independent Pedagogical Publication
Elvira Shamonova — General Director, Khabarovsk Territorial Education Centre

12.09.2018
09:30—11:00

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 8

Improving Living Conditions

National Projects: What Will Be Done in the Far East? Housing and Urban Environment

The level of old and dilapidated housing in the Russian Far East is very high, accounting for 6% of the total housing stock in 2016, which is more than two-and-a-half times higher than the average for Russia. Public infrastructure in the Far Eastern Federal District is characterized by the fact that utility networks and facilities are in a decrepit state, and there is a lack of capacity to cover even the existing loads, which means that its operation is cost intensive. The proportion of the housing stock that has access to plumbing in the Far Eastern Federal District is 75%, compared with a Russian average of 81.5%. Only 62% of the housing stock in the macroregion is served by a hot water supply system, whereas the average Russian rate is 68%. Changing the situation will require a national project that includes special measures for the accelerated development of the macroregion and the necessary funding, including in such areas as special mortgage products, provision of housing for young families, remediation of dilapidated housing, and elimination of the period that citizens who are leaving the regions of the Far North and other equivalent localities must wait to receive housing subsidies. What measures should be taken as part of the national project? How can the Russian Far East be brought up to the same level as the rest of the country? How much money will be needed?


Moderator:
Vasily Savin — Partner, Head of Power and Utilities, KPMG in Russia and the CIS

Panellists:
Dmitriy Berdnikov — Mayor of Irkutsk City
Alex de Valukhoff — General Director, Aggreko Eurasia
Alexey Muratov — Partner, KB Strelka
Alexander Plutnik — Chief Executive Officer, Chairman of the Management Board, DOM.RF
Igor Shuvalov — Chairman, State Corporation "Bank for Development and Foreign Economic Affairs (Vnesheconombank)"
Vladimir Yakushev — Minister of Construction, Housing, and Utilities of the Russian Federation

Front row participants:
Andrey Levykin — Director of Far East Branch, MegaFon
Aleksey Struchkov — First Deputy Prime Minister of the Republic of Sakha(Yakutia)
Dmitriy Tetenkin — Adviser to the Minister for the Development of the Russian Far East
Hideyuki Yamada — Senior Consultant, Nomura Research Institute Ltd.

12.09.2018
09:30—11:00

Building D, level 5, Conference hall 12

Improving Living Conditions

The Far Eastern Hectare: From Granting to Developing

It has already been two years since the first residents of the Far East received land under the Far Eastern Hectare programme, and over the last 18 months, it has been rolled out on a national level. The programme provides a simplified procedure for obtaining a plot of land in comparison with the typical process. The main advantage of the programme is that it makes it easier to acquire land. The success of the programme points to a further need to develop the ways in which land plots are used, including in ways that foster entrepreneurship. What are the success stories of the Far Eastern Hectare programme? How should the programme be developed in the future? What factors limit the development of the programme? What support measures should be considered?


Moderator:
Irina Lutskovskaya — Special Correspondent, GTRK Dalnevostochnaya

Panellists:
Marina Dedyushko — Deputy Minister for the Development of the Russian Far East
Roman Kapinos — Deputy Chairman of the Board, SME Bank
Alexey Uspenskiy — Minister of Economic Development of the Sakhalin Region
Sergei Khovrat — General Director, Agency for the Development of Human Capital in the Far Eastern Federal District
Yury Chayka — First Deputy Chair of the Government of Khabarovsk Territory for Investment and Priority Projects

12.09.2018
09:30—11:00

Building D, level 6, Conference hall 17

Improving Living Conditions

Genetic Engineering: A Boon to the Economy or a Threat to Life?

Modern biotechnologies, including synthetic biology and genome editing, are currently some of the most promising growth areas in science and the economy. In many countries of the world, including the countries of the Asia-Pacific region, bioengineering projects are receiving support from national governments. Genetic engineering has opened the door to effective tools for the reproduction of natural organisms and the creation of ‘synthetic’ biological material that has never before been seen in nature. There are more than 100 large laboratories around the world working in this field and tens of billions of US dollars have been invested. The last 10 years have witnessed the rapid growth of publications and patent applications in Europe, the United States, India, and China. Developments in genetic engineering are beneficial for health. They are especially important in the fight against infections and the development of vaccines, and they also have important applications in agriculture, industry, and other sectors of the economy. At the same time, biotechnologies are becoming more accessible, allowing a wide range of researchers to conduct experiments more or less at home, including those involving the pathogens of dangerous infectious diseases. Thus, although synthetic biology offers benefits in terms of economic, scientific, and technological development, the field also poses potential risks associated with threats to the human body and the environment that are not fully understood. These risks are extremely high, and the possible consequences that they entail are comparable to nuclear radiation in terms of scale. Coordinated actions by the government as well as by scientific and business communities are required to prevent any possible threats from manifesting themselves. What future will achievements in biotechnology bring about? Does research in the field of synthetic biology need to be regulated at the national and international levels? How can we prevent the negative impacts of biotechnology? Who bears responsibility for research outcomes: the scientist, customer, or state? How can we forge partnerships between regional governments in this area?


Moderator:
Anna Popova — Head, Federal Service for Surveillance on Consumer Rights Protection and Human Wellbeing

Panellists:
Dmitry Morozov — General Director, BIOCAD
Hong Du Nguyen — Director-General, Russian-Vietnamese Tropical Research and Technology Centre
Carlos Tabunda — Director of the ASEAN Studies Center, New Era University; Anchor, Net 25 TV Channel
Mikhail Shchelkanov — Head, Laboratory of Microorganism Ecology with the International Research and Educational Centre of Molecular Technologies, School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU); Head, Laboratory of Virology, Federal Scientific Centre of East Asia Terrestrial Biodiversity of Far Eastern Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences

12.09.2018
09:30—11:00

Building D, level 6, Conference hall 18

Improving Living Conditions

The Contribution of Female Innovators and Business Leaders to Shaping the Economy of the Future

Technology, business, and innovation are not only driving the development of the 21st-century economy, they are also strengthening the role of women as leaders in contemporary society. Despite women’s potential when it comes to opening up new markets and launching innovative products, their level of economic and digital participation in the Asia-Pacific region remains insufficient. This lack of full participation by women in the digital economy can be attributed to a low awareness of investment opportunities in innovative markets corresponding to their interests, and a shortage of gender-specific approaches to doing business. If the current gender disparity in the field of digital technology can be overcome, we can create the conditions in which quality of life can be improved for women, men, and society as a whole. How can the contribution of women to strengthening national and global economic, social, political, and cultural potential be assessed? What innovative products are created by women or for women? How are innovative online training platforms to support women’s entrepreneurship being promoted? How is women’s role in the digital age changing? What tools exist to improve women's access to advanced technologies?


Moderator:
Victoria Panova — Vice-Rector for International Relations, Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU)

Panellists:
Marina Zhunich — Director for Government Relations, Google LLC
Irina Makieva — Deputy Chair, Bank for Development and Foreign Economic Affairs (Vnesheconombank)
Agnessa Osipova — President, Russian Franchise Association (RFA)
Wang Ping — Chairman, China Chamber of Tourism
Ekaterina Rybakova — Co-Founder, President, Rybakov Foundation
Yuliana Slashcheva — Chairman of the Management Board, Creative Production Association Soyuzmultfilm Film Studio FSUE
Natalya Tretyak — First Vice President, Gazprombank
Anna Tsivileva — Chairman of the Board of Directors, Kolmar Group

12.09.2018
11:30—13:00

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 6

Improving Living Conditions

National Ecology Project: State Priorities, Business Opportunities

A total of more than RUB 4 trillion will be spent on implementation of Russia’s national Ecology project. Of those, RUB 727 billion are expected to come from the federal budget, an additional RUB 81 billion from regional budgets, and RUB 3207 billion from extra-budgetary sources (primarily industrial enterprises). What roles are assigned to the state, regions, and companies regarding implementation of the national project? How and through which mechanisms can the project’s main targets be achieved: creating a safe waste management system, reducing harmful emissions, improving water quality, preserving unique water and forestry resources, developing specially protected natural areas, and preserving biodiversity? What are the priorities of the national project for the Far East? How can a balance between the development of the regional economy and the preservation of a thriving environment be achieved?


Moderator:
Maria Morgun — Chief Editor, Live Planet TV

Panellists:
Kirill Dmitriev — Chief Executive Officer, Russian Direct Investment Fund (RDIF)
Viktor Evtukhov — State Secretary, Deputy Minister of Industry and Trade of the Russian Federation
Sergei Ivanov — Special Presidential Representative for Environmental Protection, Ecology and Transport
Dmitry Kobylkin — Minister of Natural Resources and Environment of the Russian Federation
Alexey Likhachev — Chief Executive Officer, State Atomic Energy Corporation ROSATOM
Vyacheslav Solomin — Chief Executive Officer, EN+ GROUP
Vladimir Yakushev — Minister of Construction, Housing, and Utilities of the Russian Federation

Front row participants:
Sergey Aramilev — General Director, Amur Tiger Centre Autonomous Non-Profit Organization
Yuriy Korotaev — General Director, Duracell Russia
Petr Shpilenok — Director, Kronotsky State Natural Biosphere Reserve

12.09.2018
11:30—13:00

Building D, level 5, Conference hall 15

Improving Living Conditions

Healthy Life Expectancy in the Russian Far East

The national development goals of Russia include raising life expectancy to 78 years and ensuring sustainable natural population growth. In addition, a national demographics project has been developed. The indicators of the Far Eastern regions in this area are lower than the national average, and the gap is even more pronounced when we compare the region to neighbouring countries. To adequately respond to this challenge, the government will need to take a special approach to planning healthcare development in the Russian Far East. Given the region’s limited resources, it is necessary to take measures to improve the population’s quality of life in ways that will allow residents to lead professionally and physically active lives. What resources will be needed to increase life expectancy in the Russian Far East? In what ways is healthcare cooperation with neighbouring countries currently being developed?


Moderator:
Georgy Kaptelin — Deputy Editor-in-Chief, TASS Russia

Panellists:
Dmitry Morozov — General Director, BIOCAD
Takao Nishida — Deputy Secretary General, Hokuto Social Medical Corporation
Aleksandr Rumyantsev — General Director, Dmitry Rogachev National Research Centre
Valentin Shumatov — Rector, Pacific State Medical University
Hidetoshi Endo — Director, Education and Innovation Centre for Geriatrics and Gerontology, National Centre for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Japan
Tatyana Yakovleva — First Deputy Minister of Healthcare of the Russian Federation

Front row participants:
Lyubov Drozdova — Senior Researcher, Department of Primary Prevention of Chronic Non-Infectious Diseases in the Healthcare System, FGBU State Scientific and Research Center for Preventive Medicine of the Ministry of Healthcare of the Russian Federation
Ekaterina Kruglova — Managing Director, Memory of Generations Charity Foundation
Pavel Serebryakov — Vice Governor of Primorsky Territory for Healthcare, Social Affairs, Physical Culture and Sport
Olga Tkacheva — Director, Russian Gerontology Clinical Research Centre (RGNKC)

12.09.2018
11:30—13:00

Building D, level 6, Conference hall 16

Improving Living Conditions

National Projects: What Will Be Done in the Far East? Demographics

The strategic goal of the demographic policy of the Russian Far East covering the period to 2025 is to stabilize the population at 6.2 million by 2020 and increase it to 6.5 million by 2025. Ensuring the growth of the population of the macroregion will require implementing a set of systematic measures that are designed to stimulate the birth rate by increasing the amount of social welfare payments that are awarded on the birth of a child, increasing life expectancy and reducing mortality, reducing migration outflow, and encouraging people from other regions of the country to resettle in the area. How can we implement special measures to achieve the goals of the national programme for demographic growth in the Far East and ensure that these measures are adequately funded? What needs to be done to ensure population growth? How can we reduce migration outflow and encourage people to resettle in the region?


Moderator:
Valery Fedorov — Director General, Russian Public Opinion Research Center (VCIOM)

Panellists:
Vsevolod Vukolov — Head, Federal Service for Labour and Employment (Rostrud)
Andrey Kaprin — Director, Federal State Budgetary Institution National Medical Research Radiological Centre of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation
Oleg Skufinskiy — Deputy Presidential Plenipotentiary Envoy to the Far Eastern Federal District
Natalya Trunova — Vice President, Head of Spatial Development, Center for Strategic Research Foundation
Nikolay Kharitonov — Chairman of the Committee for Regional Policy and Issues of the North and Far East, State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation
Svetlana Yachevskaya — Deputy Chairman of the Management Board, Member of the Management Board, State Corporation Bank for Development and Foreign Economic Affairs (Vnesheconombank)

Front row participants:
Veronica Peshkova — President, Foundation for the Development of Public Diplomacy Women's Perspective
Tatyana Savchenko — Deputy Chairman of the Government of Magadan Region
Nikolay Sivak — Commercial Director of Healthcare Sector, Philips Russia and CIS
Vera Shcherbina — Chairperson of the Government of Sakhalin Region

12.09.2018
11:30—13:00

Building D, level 6, Conference hall 17

Improving Living Conditions

National Projects: What Will Be Done in the Far East? Education and Science

According to 2017 statistics, a high proportion of schoolchildren in the Far East still go to school in the afternoon and evening during the so-called 'second shift’. At 249, the number of students attending institutions of higher education per 10,000 residents is lower than the national average of 289. Across the macroregion, 13% of public schools are housed in buildings which are in a decrepit state or require major repairs. Close to 70% of equipment in schools is obsolete, and in a large number of buildings major repairs have not been performed for more than 50 years. In recent years, the percentage of graduate students defending dissertations who have graduated from institutions of higher education has also dropped significantly. How can we address the fact that the Russian Far East is falling behind? What approach should we take to determine the financial contribution of the regions of the Far Eastern Federal District in solving these problems as part of national and federal projects? Why is it necessary to envisage the creation of world-class scientific centres in the Far Eastern Federal District?


Moderator:
Marina Rakova — Chief Executive Officer, Russian Foundation for Educational Development

Panellists:
Igor Barinov — Head, Russian Federal Agency for Ethnic Affairs
Alexander Bugaev — Head, Federal Agency for Youth Affairs (Rosmolodezh)
Olga Vasilyeva — Minister of Enlightenment of the Russian Federation
Alexander Povalko — Chief Executive Officer, Chairman of the Management Board, RVC
Robert Urazov — Chief Executive Officer, Agency for the Development of Professional Communities and Skilled Workers (WorldSkills Russia)

Front row participants:
Eugeniy Nizhnik — Deputy General Director, Agency for the Development of Human Capital in the Far Eastern Federal District
Nina Polichka — Director, Far Eastern Scientific Centre of Local Self-Government
Vladimir Solodov — Acting Chairman of the Government of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)
Natalya Tretyak — First Vice President, Gazprombank
Elvira Shamonova — General Director, Khabarovsk Territorial Education Centre

12.09.2018
11:45—13:00

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 2

Improving Living Conditions

Presentation of the Digital Economy School of the Far Eastern Federal University

Colossal potential of the digital world is creating demand for educated specialists in advanced areas of expertise, for professionals who will create the future of the country and the world with their own hands. Digital economy is an inexhaustible source of new technology and disruptive discovery that boosts competition among specialists on the market, whole regions, and even countries. Russia’s first Digital Economy School was opened in the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) in 2018 supported by Sberbank as one of the key partners. Students can choose from five Master’s courses created together with Russia’s tech leaders, best universities, and science centers: “Artificial Intelligence and Big Data”, “Virtual and Augmented Reality”, “Cybersecurity”, “Regional Development Based on Remote Earth Probing Technology and Data”, and “Digital Art”. Dynamic, modular curricula allow for individual learning tracks. The teaching process is coupled with implementation of high-tech projects started by market-leading IT companies. It is the place for new ideas and daring projects.


Presentation of the Digital Economy School of the Far Eastern Federal University:
Nikita Anisimov — Rector, Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU)

Speech on Competences of the Future and New Trends in Technology:
Herman Gref — Chief Executive Officer, Chairman of the Executive Board, Sberbank

12.09.2018
17:00—18:30

Building A, level 5, Conference hall 10

Improving Living Conditions

Telemedicine in Russia: Ensuring that New Technologies Save Lives

Since the new telemedicine law came into effect in 2018, a new market for such services has emerged in Russia. Experts estimate that it will be worth around RUB 18.5 billion this year, and RUB 68 billion in 2023. Across the vast expanses of Russia's Far East, telemedicine is particularly important, and is growing rapidly. It is clear that telemedical and other information technologies can overcome distances, contribute to better medical decisions, make it easier for health workers and patients to communicate, and assist with the collection and analysis of big data. However, it should not be forgotten that they are only technologies: the most important aspect of healthcare is for processes to be standardized. It is no coincidence that the aviation, auto, and nuclear industries all put process before technology. This means that both traditional and new models of healthcare should clearly specify what is to be done, by whom, and when, how staff and patients should be educated, and how infrastructure should support processes. Only then will the new technologies prove their worth and save lives. Does the new telemedicine law meet the development needs of these services? Have any standard operating procedures been specified for telemedical services? How will personal data be protected? What requirements do public and private telemedical service providers need to meet? Where will patient data be held, and how will such data make medical decisions easier? What additional resources are needed for wide-scale adoption of IT in healthcare?


Moderator:
Evelina Zakamskaya — Editor-in-Chief, Doctor Channel; Anchor, Russia 24

Panellists:
Alexander Akkuratov — Sales Director in Russia, Philips LLC
Ilya Larchenko — Chief Innovation Officer, Doc+
Oleg Pak — Chief Doctor, Medical Centre, Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU)
Mingjun Zu — President, Golden Days International Medical Technology Co., Ltd
Dmitry Churilov — Chief Physician, Vladivostok Ambulance Station

12.09.2018
17:00—18:30

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 7

Improving Living Conditions

National Projects: What Will Be Done in the Far East? Culture

The network of cultural and art institutions in the Russian Far East has high potential. The Far Eastern Federal District is home to philharmonic societies, cinemas, circuses, parks of culture and recreation, and theatres for children and adults, including federally funded institutions, such as the Primorsky Stage of the State Mariinsky Theatre and a branch of the Vaganova Academy of Russian Ballet, as well as professional educational institutions and art schools. At the same time, the number of buildings housing cultural institutions that are in an unsatisfactory state of repair in the Far East exceeds the average Russian level. Visitor numbers also remain low and the problem of staffing in this sector is quite acute. Despite the measures that have been taken, there are a number of positions that have been left vacant due to a lack of housing and low wages. In order to help the Russian Far East to catch up, it is necessary to ensure that the national programme covers and funds special measures that are aimed at creating cultural and recreational organizations; cultural, educational, and museum centres featuring concert halls and schools of theatre, music, choreography, and other creative arts; as well as exhibition spaces, virtual concert halls, and cinemas, including in rural areas. What is the current assessment of the gap between the Russian national average values for key indicators and the values that are recorded in the Far Eastern Federal District? What are the target indicators that should be improved as part of the national cultural programme, and what values should be achieved in the Far East by 2024? How much funding is required for the national cultural programme in the Russian Far East?


Moderator:
Victor Shalai — Director, Arseniev State Museum of Primorsky Region

Panellists:
Felix Azhimov — Director for Expertise and Analytics, Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU)
Asya Gabysheva — Director, National Art Museum of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)
Lyudmila Gorlacheva — Minister of Culture and Tourism of Magadan Region
Aleksandra Maksimets — General Director, "SEAWOLF. Cinematic stories creation" LLC
Eduard Smirnov — Chairman, Primorsky Regional Branch of All-Russian Public-Government Organization Russian Military Historical Society

Front row participants:
Svetlana Aygistova — Minister of Culture of Kamchatka Territory
Alexey Samarin — Minister of Culture and Archives of Sakhalin Region
Vladimir Tikhonov — Minister of Culture and Spiritual Development of the Sakha Republic (Yakutia)
Andrey Chugunov — Rector, Far Eastern State Institute of Arts

12.09.2018
17:00—18:30

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 8

Improving Living Conditions

The Smart City: From Theory to Practice

The modern city is changing how its residents live, creating an environment for development, and providing a place where people can achieve their creative and intellectual potential. The appearance and comfort of our cities and towns have become important competitive factors in attracting and retaining the active part of the population, namely young professionals. In order to compete for human capital, the cities of the Russian Far East must, in one way or another, change their approach to development strategies. The integrated and phased introduction of ‘smart’ solutions in all areas of urban life will help to reduce utility costs, optimize resource consumption, make cities affordable and convenient for people, and attract investors. The opportunities for ‘smart’ development are mainly determined by high human and innovative potential, aspects which determine long-term social and economic development trends and improve the quality of the urban environment. What is a ‘smart city’? Which international technologies and best practices should be followed? Which are the first solutions that might be implemented in the Russian Far East? What mechanisms need to be developed in order to make cities smarter and attract investors?


Moderator:
Andrey Chibis — Deputy Minister of Construction, Housing and Utilities of the Russian Federation

Panellists:
Lev Gorilovskiy — Member of the Board of Directors, Polyplastic Group
Dmitry Dyrmovsky — General Director, Member of the Board of Directors, Speech Technology Centre
Hiroaki Ishizuka — Chairman, New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO)
Aysen Nikolaev — Acting Head of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)
Mikhail Oseevskiy — President, Rostelecom
Fumihiko Yuki — Vice-Minister for Infrastructure, Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism of Japan

Front row participants:
Alexey Abramov — Head, The Federal Agency on Technical Regulating and Metrology
Christopher Miller — Program Leader, World Bank Russian Federation
Dmitriy Tetenkin — Adviser to the Minister for the Development of the Russian Far East

12.09.2018
17:00—18:30

Building B, level 7, Conference hall 4

Improving Living Conditions

Talent 20.35: Challenges and Solutions

Contemporary realities are giving rise to new challenges. The transformation of the economy, and as a result, the labour market, has resulted in current education systems being unable to satisfy the needs of the digital economy and ensure the implementation of National Technology Initiative roadmaps. One response to the demand from the state, business, and society for improved identification, development, and cultivation of talent is the creation of University 20.35 – a new kind of networked education system based on the best global practices used by education organizations and digital education platforms, and on the best courses and models for personal training. This new model of university is making it possible to move away from analogue paper credentials, and to replace them with digital skills passports, which are constantly supplemented by virtue of the ‘digital footprint’. One of the tasks of the university is to train individuals to manage based on data from teams of federal and regional government bodies. How can the education system be quickly reconfigured from an institution-centric one to an individual-centric one? How can we help individuals to understand and develop their own abilities? What tools can be used to assess skills ‘in the moment’? What is a Chief Data Officer, how many of them will be needed by 2035, and what is the most effective way to train them? Could artificial intelligence be capable of recommending a path for individual development based on big data collected during the training process? Could the Russian Far East become a region for self-development in difficult circumstances and position itself in the avant-garde of working with talented people?


Moderator:
Nikita Anisimov — Rector, Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU)

Panellists:
Vladislav Boutenko — Senior Partner, Managing Director, Chairman in Russia, The Boston Consulting Group
Olga Vasilyeva — Minister of Enlightenment of the Russian Federation
Vsevolod Vukolov — Head, Federal Service for Labour and Employment (Rostrud)
Pavel Gudkov — Deputy General Director, Foundation for Assistance to Small Innovative Enterprises
Mikhail Nikolayev — President of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) (1991-2002)
Dmitry Peskov — Special Representative of the President of the Russian Federation on Digital and Technological Development; Director of the Young Professionals direction, Agency for Strategic Initiatives
Vasily Tretyakov — General Director, University 20.35 Autonomous Non-Commercial Organization
Robert Urazov — Chief Executive Officer, Agency for the Development of Professional Communities and Skilled Workers (WorldSkills Russia)

Front row participants:
Mikhail Akim — Vice President, ABB Ltd; Chairman, Working Group for Modernization and Innovations, Association of European Businesses (AEB)
Dmitry Zemtsov — Head of the National Technology Initiative working group on developing continuing and non-formal education, Study Group Movement
Mikhail Khomich — Deputy Prime Minister, Udmurt Republic

12.09.2018
17:00—18:30

Building D, level 6, Conference hall 18

Improving Living Conditions

From the Funding of Social Services to the Achievement of Social Impacts

Russia’s social development goals have been defined and include increasing life expectancy, reducing poverty, and natural population growth. These goals are especially relevant today for the Russian Far East. To address these issues, it will not be enough to just increase public expenditure. New approaches and solutions that combine private initiative, a focus on a specific result, and resources and investment will be required. When implementing social projects, it is often not the process of providing a service that is important, but rather the specific changes and social impacts that are achieved in a particular sector. Will Russia be able to switch from redistributing state budgets to finance services to a model that involves financing outcomes and achieving social and economic impacts? What tools are available for attracting private initiatives and investment to achieve social impacts? What are the key differences between the new funding tools and the traditional format for financing services and public–private partnerships? What has the experience of implementing social impact projects in other countries been? What impact has the SIB tool had on social issues in other countries? What is the role of the state in developing this tool? What is the role of social impact projects in achieving national development goals in the social sphere in the Russian Far East?


Moderator:
Marina Rakova — Chief Executive Officer, Russian Foundation for Educational Development

Panellists:
Marina Borovskaya — Deputy Minister of Science and Higher Education of the Russian Federation
Innokentiy Dementyev — Deputy General Director, Presidential Grants for Civil Society Development Foundation
Ilya Torosov — Deputy Minister of Economic Development of the Russian Federation
Hidetoshi Endo — Director, Education and Innovation Centre for Geriatrics and Gerontology, National Centre for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Japan
Svetlana Yachevskaya — Deputy Chairman of the Management Board, Member of the Management Board, State Corporation Bank for Development and Foreign Economic Affairs (Vnesheconombank)

Front row participant:
Nikolay Milkis — Deputy Governor, Director of Economic Development Department, Government of the Khanty-Mansiysk Autonomous Okrug-Ugra

13.09.2018
10:00—11:30

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 9

Improving Living Conditions

The Young People of the Far East

The young people of the world are the driving force behind innovation and creativity,
the catalyst for putting new initiatives, ideas, and movements into practice, and a reservoir of vast intellectual potential. The young people of the Russian Far East hold the key to overall economic development in the macroregion. The rapid growth of youth entrepreneurship, the implementation of projects which are strategically important to the regions, and the establishment of an environment in which economically advantageous ideas can be replicated are all facilitating further development in the Far East. Entrepreneurial activity by young people in the Far Eastern Federal District is capable of making a significant contribution to increasing the gross regional product. But how can we attract young people to the Far East? What conditions are required to establish a youth entrepreneurship ecosystem in the Far East? How can we develop cross-border youth entrepreneurship?


Moderator:
Alexey Bobrovsky — Head of the Economic Programme, Russia 24 TV Channel

Panellists:
Yekaterina Dragunova — Deputy Head, Federal Agency for Youth Affairs (Rosmolodezh)
Alexander Kalinin — President, All-Russian Non-Governmental Organization of Small and Medium-Sized Businesses OPORA RUSSIA
Ivan Komarov — Director of Education Projects, Delovaya Sreda JSC
Aleksey Mostovshchikov — Co-chairman of Magadan Regional Division, Delovaya Rossiya (Business Russia)
Vladimir Solodov — Acting Chairman of the Government of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)

Front row participants:
Tatiana Andreeva — General Director, Centre for Business and Innovation Development Initiative
Denis Balura — Managing Partner, Modern Services
Alim Galimullin — Co-Founder, Gafel
Alexander Golovko — Individual Entrepreneur
Stanislav Terekhov — Individual Entrepreneur

13.09.2018
12:30—14:00

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 9

Improving Living Conditions

How Can Volunteers Help Develop the Far East?

Participation in the volunteer movement is fundamentally changing the way people live in the Russian Far East. It is not only helping to bring together active, committed people, whose spiritual and creative potential is being revealed through their involvement in volunteer projects, it is also creating a whole community of successful, open-minded, and purposeful citizens. And it is these citizens who will provide the starting point for imaginative and socially significant projects aimed primarily at improving and developing the Far East. What benefits can volunteering bring to development in the Russian Far East? What is the value of this movement that has come to encompass every aspect of people’s lives? How do we ensure that volunteering becomes an integral part of everyone’s life? Is there a need to consider volunteering through the prism of international projects, and what mechanisms for cooperation with such projects are available? How can volunteers help to resolve the region’s problems?


Moderator:
Artem Metelev — Chairman of the Council, Association of Volunteer Centers; Member of the Public Chamber of the Russian Federation

Panellists:
Undral Gombodorj — Chairperson, Network of Mongolian Volunteer Organizations (NMVO)
Yekaterina Dragunova — Deputy Head, Federal Agency for Youth Affairs (Rosmolodezh)
Ilya Popov — Founder, GoodSurfing Global Project
Ekaterina Rybakova — Co-Founder, Rybakov Foundation
Valery Fedorov — Director General, Russian Public Opinion Research Center (VCIOM)
Natalia Yakunina — Head, Dream Island Environmental Project