Programme

Plenary Session Economic Policy in Russia’s East: What’s Next? Doing Business in the Russian Far East We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation The Russian Far East: Creating a New Quality of Life by Responding to Challenges Business Dialogue Demographic Policy. New Residents in the Far East ‘Intellectual Property: A Regional Development Tool’ International Forum Presentation of investment projects
06.09.2017
10:30—12:00

Building A, level 3, Conference hall 16

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Renewable Energy: The Outlook for Supplying Energy to Remote Regions That Are Not Part of the National Electricity Network

Despite the frenetic pace of development in Asia-Pacific countries, the social and economic growth of important regions is being held back by an inadequate or non-existent supply of energy. To a certain extent, this issue is being addressed by diesel power stations, although the high cost of fuel, including delivery, results in high electricity prices, while diesel facilities already in operation are harmful to the environment. Building power lines for a small number of consumers is not economically viable. At the same time, modernizing existing forms of electricity generation (or creating new ones) which make use of renewable energy sources – primarily solar and wind energy – would significantly decrease the cost of electricity, reduce atmospheric emissions, and create a solution which could be applied to numerous remote, isolated areas. For Russia, this is an issue of great importance: around 20 million people (13.7% of the population) live in regions with a decentralized energy supply. Russia already has experience of building autonomous hybrid solar-diesel and wind-diesel power plants, primarily in the Sakha Republic, the Altai Republic, and the Transbaikal region. Refining these facilities further would, however, require international cooperation, both in terms of manufacturing components and mechanisms, and in helping to develop remote regions. What measures should be implemented in Asia-Pacific countries in order to realize the potential of renewable energy to provide remote regions with an electricity supply? What is the potential for international cooperation between the countries of the Asia-Pacific region in this field? How can existing solutions for remote and isolated regions based on renewable energy sources be applied to third countries in the Asia-Pacific region?

Moderator:
Evelina Zakamskaya — Anchor, Russia 24

Panellists:
Denis Askinadze — Deputy General Director, Far East and Baikal Region Development Fund
Anatoliy Chubais — Chairman of the Executive Board, RUSNANO Corporation
Nikolay Duraev — First Deputy Minister of Housing and Utilities and Energy of the Republic of Sakha Yakutia
Anton Inyutsyn — Deputy Minister of Energy of the Russian Federation
George Rizhinashvili — Member of the Management Board, First Deputy Director General, RusHydro
Igor Shakhray — General Director, Hevel

Front row participant:
Igor Dubovskiy — Director of the Investment Department, Far East Investment and Export Agency

06.09.2017
10:30—12:00

Building B, level 5, Conference hall 3

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Russia–Mongolia: A Meeting Point in the Russian Far East

Relations between Russia and Mongolia have a long history based on a tradition of good neighbourliness, and are orientated towards further development in the spirit of strategic partnership. Mongolia has an enduring interest in Russian technology, and remains a place which cherishes and respects the Russian language and the culture and traditions of Russia’s peoples. Business relations between the two countries recognize the need to bring a new dynamic to bilateral collaboration and to realize the potential of trade and economic cooperation. Areas in which expanded collaboration shows obvious promise include energy, transit, developing border regions, and environmental conservation. Strengthening cooperation between Mongolia and the EAEU could prove to be a strong driver of growth in mutual trade and cross-border economic partnership.
What decisions could provide a fresh boost to bilateral cooperation? In what sectors does cooperation between Russia and Mongolia show the most potential? How can effective collaboration between Russia and Mongolia be ensured in trade regulation, removing barriers to trade, and supporting the flow of goods and investment? What strategic proposals exist for developing bilateral relations?

Moderator:
Dambadarjaa Jargalsaikhan — Anchor, Independent Economist

Panellists:
Iskander Azizov — Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the Russian Federation in Mongolia
Bayarsaikhan Banzragchiyn — Chairman, National Development Agency of Mongolia
Khaltmaagiin Battulga — President of Mongolia
Oleg Belozerov — President, Chairman of the Board, Russian Railways
Grigory Berezkin — Chairman of the Board of Directors, ESN Group
Banzragch Delgermaa — Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of Mongolia in the Russian Federation
Sergey Donskoy — Minister of Natural Resources and Environment of the Russian Federation
Dangaagiyn Ganbat — Minister of Road and Transport Development of Mongolia
Igor Levitin — Aide to the President of the Russian Federation
Konstantin Petukhov — Deputy General Director for Services Development and Implementation, Rosseti
Victor Vekselberg — Chairman of the Board of Directors, Renova Group; President, Skolkovo Foundation

06.09.2017
10:30—12:00

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 9

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Partnership for Greater Eurasia: Expanding a Future-Oriented Joint Development Space

The Eurasian continent is becoming a flagship example of regional integration, which is focused primarily on the interests of the countries of Greater Eurasia. Developments are taking place in the Eurasian Economic Union (EAEC), the ‘Belt and Road’ economic cooperation system, the initiatives being implemented by ASEAN countries, and the South Asia cooperation programme run under the aegis of India. Ensuring synergy rather than competition between Eurasian projects could advance the interests of all the continent’s nations. This is exactly the idea of the Eurasian Economic Partnership (EEP), or Greater Eurasia: building a space for joint development by creating an economic relations system that takes account of the interests of all of its participants without being tied to the signing of any one collective agreement in particular. How and by what means can the EEP be created? To what extent can the EEP serve both as a common cooperation framework and as a platform for using specific trade and investment mechanisms? What benefits can the establishment of the EEP bring to the region’s countries? How can the experience gained from the success of multilateral trade agreements and pending projects initiated by mega-regional trading blocs be taken into account in the formation of the EEP? What balance between liberalization and protectionism today best meets the interests of EEP member countries and their partners?

Moderator:
Sergey Karaganov — Dean, School of International Economics and Foreign Affairs, National Research University Higher School of Economics; Honorary Chairman of the Presidium, Council on Foreign and Defence Policy

Panellists:
Rashid Alimov — Secretary General, Shanghai Cooperation Organisation
Andrey Denisov — Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the Russian Federation to the People's Republic of China
Alexandrs Isurins — Chairman of the Executive Board, President, Far Eastern Shipping Company (FESCO)
Hyun Jung Taik — President, Korea Institute for International Economic Policy (KIEP)
Edward Luttwak — Senior Associate, Center for International and Strategic Studies (CSIS)
Veronika Nikishina — Member of the Board, Minister in Charge of Trade, Eurasian Economic Commission
Vladimir Salamatov — Doctor of Economics, PhD in Technical Sciences, Professor; General Director, International Trade and Integration
Alexander Shokhin — President, Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs (RSPP)

06.09.2017
10:30—12:00

Building D, level 5, Conference hall 12

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

The Potential of the Northern Sea Route. From Words to Actions

The Northern Sea Route is the shortest sea route from Asia to Europe, and experts estimate that by 2050 it will be passable for non-ice reinforced vessels all year round. Taking this into consideration, it is strategically advisable at this point to begin developing the Northern Sea Route for purposes other than simply the transport of natural resources from the Arctic zone, or ‘northern deliveries’. In 2016, a model for establishing a regular Arctic container line using the Northern Sea Route was developed. The niche which will be filled by the Northern Sea Route relates to container cargo transit between the ports of North-East Asia (China, Japan, and South Korea) and those of Northern Europe (Rotterdam, Hamburg, and others), which is preferable to a southern route. Around 455,000 TEUs of container cargo traffic currently have transit paths for which use of the Northern Sea Route would provide a significant advantage to the shipper. An optimal logistics scheme has been developed for a regular Arctic container line: transit will be conducted between two port hubs in the cities of Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky and Murmansk using ice-class container ships, with additional feeder lines to end-ports in Europe or Asia. How can participation in the joint development of the Northern Sea Route be made attractive to China, Japan, and South Korea? Would there be merit in establishing a joint venture to manage a regular Arctic container line? How can competitive conditions for container cargo transit via the Northern Sea Route be ensured? Could investment in Northern Sea Route infrastructure be made profitable in the long term?

Moderator:
Alexey Volostnov — Managing Director, Frost & Sullivan Russia

Panellists:
Evgeniy Ambrosov — Senior Executive Vice-President, PAO "Sovcomflot"
Vladimir Korchanov — Member of the Executive Board, First Vice President, FESCO
Dmitry Purim — General Director, Chairman of the Management Board, Sovfracht
Aleksandr Roslyakov — Chief Executive Officer, Onego Shipping
Tero Vauraste — Chair, Arctic Economic Council (AEC)

Front row participants:
Rene Berkvens — Chief Executive Officer, Damen Shipyards Group NV
Kirill Golokhvast — Vice Rector for Research, Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU)
Dmitry Gudimenko — Chief Executive Officer, Capital Development Group
Shinichi Ishii — Senior Consultant, Nomura Research University
Sang-Hyun Suh — President, Korea Research Institute of Ships & Ocean Engineering (KRISO)

06.09.2017
12:45—14:15

Building A, level 3, Conference hall 17

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

‘Russia’s Gateway to Asia’: The Role of the Russian Far East in Asia-Pacific Integration Initiatives

Asia today is growing ever more self-reliant, and, accordingly, more closed-off externally and more open and competitive internally as a market. Other EAEU countries can gain access to this market via the Russian Far East. To safeguard its own interests to the greatest extent possible, it is important for the region to take on a proactive role, cooperating with the Eurasian Economic Commission (EEC) in two key international areas of its activity in the coming years: coupling together the EAEU and the Belt and Road initiative, and concluding free trade agreements with partners in the Asia-Pacific region. The Russian Far East is the part of both Russia and the Eurasian Economic Union, which is situated directly in the Asia-Pacific region, and taking its interests into consideration is vital when building a long-term format for relations with countries of the region. What needs does the Russian Far East have with respect to integration processes in the Asia-Pacific region? How far are the parties prepared to go on the question of creating a free trade zone? To what extent would this be in the interests of the Russian Far East? Could the ‘coupling’ be open for other regional partners to join? Where do participants view a role for the institutions of the EAEU, and where can there be bilateral tracks within the ‘coupling’? How can investment in the Russian Far East be stimulated using free trade zones?

Moderator:
Timofei Bordachev — Programme Director, The Valdai Discussion Club

Panellists:
Evgeniy Chekin — Chairman of the Government of the Republic of Sakha Yakutia
Kirill Dmitriev — Chief Executive Officer, JSC Managing Company Russian Direct Investment Fund (RDIF)
Shinji Hirai — Governor of Tottori Prefecture
Pavel Kadochnikov — President, Center for Strategic Research Foundation
Leyla Mammadzada — Chief Executive Officer, Summa Group
Veronika Nikishina — Member of the Board, Minister in Charge of Trade, Eurasian Economic Commission
Alexander Shokhin — President, Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs (RSPP)
Igor Shuvalov — First Deputy Prime Minister of the Russian Federation
Wu Sikang — Director, Development Research Center of Shenzhen Municipal People's Government

Front row participants:
Igor Makarov — Senior Research Fellow, Centre for Comprehensive European and International Studies (CCEIS), Faculty of World Economy and International Affairs, National Research University – Higher School of Economics
Bong Kwon Park — Editor, Maeil Business Newspaper

06.09.2017
12:45—14:15

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 8

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Competitive Law and the International Arbitration Centre in the Russian Far East

Guarantees for the protection of ownership rights, together with access to effective channels for resolving disputes with counterparties, are of significant importance in the decision as to whether to expand a business into a particular region. The examples of Hong Kong and Singapore show that the presence of competitive systems of law and independent centres of arbitration in these jurisdictions has been an important factor in the development of Asian economic centres. Could the Free Port of Vladivostok repeat the successes of Hong Kong and Singapore in establishing competitive systems for law and arbitration? And if so, how can this be achieved? How should a new arbitration centre in Vladivostok go about winning the confidence of Russian and international investors? Could it be possible to establish an Asian axis of arbitration linking Vladivostok, Beijing, Hong Kong and Singapore?

Moderators:
Andrey Gorlenko — Executive Administrator, Arbitration Center, Autonomous Non-profit Organisation "Institute of Modern Arbitration" (ANO "ISA")
Mikhail Orlov — Partner, Head of Tax and Legal, KPMG Russia

Panellists:
Jose Angelo Estrella Faria — Senior Legal Officer and Head, Technical Assistance Section, International Trade Law Division, Office of Legal Affairs, United Nations
Mikhail Galperin — Deputy Minister of Justice of the Russian Federation
Akira Kawamura — President, The Japan Association of Arbitrators (The "JAA")
Alexey Kostin — Chairman, The International Commercial Arbitration Court, Chamber of Commerce and Industry of the Russian Federation
Vladimir Kurilov — J.S.D., LL.D., Academic Supervisor, Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU); Dean, Director, School of Law, FEFU
Wesley Wong — SC, Solicitor General, Department of Justice of the Hong Kong SAR

Front row participants:
Sean Yu Chou — Partner, WongPartnership LLP
Dmitriy Dyakin — Partner, Egorov Puginsky Afanasiev & Partners
Alexander Ermolenko — Partner, FBK Legal
Pavel Komarov — Deputy General Director, Head of the Center of Monitoring and Law Enforcement Practice, Far East Development Corporation JSC
Alexander Molotnikov — Chairman of the Board, Russian-Chinese Legal Society

06.09.2017
12:45—14:15

Building B, level 7, Conference hall 5

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

The Asian Energy Ring. Are Politicians and Energy Companies Ready?

Current and projected energy demand in the Asia-Pacific region is enormous. At the same time, in many countries of the region it is precisely a lack of access to energy, which is acting as a brake on continued high growth rates. The launch of huge international energy projects is a key global trend. Projects like these help to address the disparity in access to energy resources, to calm price volatility, and to achieve political stability and regional economic development. To ensure comprehensive integration of these projects and to create a new configuration of connected energy networks, it is essential to set up a single technological platform for the electricity grid. Digital transformation, standardization, and ensuring a new level of energy security are all vital conditions for this. These challenges create a far-reaching opportunity to carry out scientific research in the field of electricity transmission, to establish new standards for managing a new-generation network, to ensure the integration of different sources of generation and smart users, and to provide cyber security. Science could become a key driver behind the creation of a platform for integrated energy networks in North-East Asia. The establishment of an Asian super-ring connecting Russia, China, Japan, South Korea, Mongolia, and possibly additional countries has the potential to solve many of the problems threatening sustainable development in the region, and could lead to enduring, mutually beneficial collaboration, not only in energy, but in a number of other sectors as well. What regulatory changes are necessary in order for such a project to be realized? Do the economic implications surrounding existing electricity transmission technologies make projects to integrate energy networks in North-East Asia viable, or is it vital to invent new, ground-breaking technologies? To what extent should technological solutions for integrated energy networks be standardized? What is the economic viability of implementing such a project, and what financial models have been used to implement similar projects?

Moderator:
Vasily Savin — Partner, Deal Advisory, Head of Power and Utilities, KPMG, Russia and CIS

Panellists:
Moon Bong-Soo — Executive Vice President and Chief Power Grid Officer, Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO)
Atsuo Iiyoshi — Chancellor, Board Chairman of Directors, Chubu University
Vyacheslav Kravchenko — Deputy Minister of Energy of the Russian Federation
Evgeniy Olkhovich — Deputy General Director for Strategic Development, Rosseti
Alexander Osipov — First Deputy Minister for the Development of the Russian Far East
Vyacheslav Solomin — Chief Executive Officer, EUROSIBENERGO PLC.
Ou Xiaoming — Head of Representative Office in the Russian Federation, State Grid Corporation of China
Chen Zhiqiang — Deputy Secretary General, Global Energy Interconnection Development and Cooperation Organization (GEIDCO)

06.09.2017
15:15—16:45

Building A, level 5, Conference hall 10

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

The Export Potential of the Russian Far East. Meeting Growing Demand in the Asia-Pacific Region

One of the key challenges posed by the creation of favourable conditions for investment in the Russian Far East lies in establishing a system for delivering regional goods to the rapidly expanding markets of the Asia-Pacific region; in particular, to markets in which the consumer represents the major economic class of modern Asia – the urban middle class. Here, the Russian Far East is in competition, not only with national Asian producers, but also with companies from the USA and Europe who have already been exporting to these markets for some time. These export competitors already enjoy the support of their Asian partners and their governments, through chambers of commerce and export-import banks. These invest directly in information, networking with Asian regulatory bodies, engaging Asian experts to do outreach work with exporters, and assisting exporters by organizing industry and marketing research in their interests. A full range of tools are used by the government in support of exports. What barriers are hindering the export of goods from the Russian Far East? How can a support system for exports from the Russian Far East be formed on a governmental and intergovernmental level? What are the most effective channels for promoting export-oriented goods produced in the Russian Far East? What role could be played by electronic platforms? How can a marketing strategy for Russian Far Eastern goods be implemented, and a ‘Made in the Russian Far East’ brand be created to promote them on foreign markets?

Moderator:
Alexey Tyupanov — Chairman of the Management Board, Chief Executive Officer, EXIAR

Panellists:
Grigory Berezkin — Chairman of the Board of Directors, ESN Group
Vadim Moshkovich — Chairman of the Board of Directors, Rusagro
Masafumi Nakada — President, Nippon Export and Investment Insurance (NEXI)
Orkhon Onon — Chief Executive Officer, Trade and Development Bank of Mongolia
Koji Yonetani — Executive Vice President, Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO)

Front row participants:
Sergey Fedorov — First Deputy Head, Far Eastern Customs Directorate, Federal Customs Service
Alexander Meshcheryakov — Senior Vice-President, Deputy Head of Corporate Block, Managing Director of International, Documentary and Transactional Business, Promsvyazbank
Alexey Nazarov — Partner, Head of Strategy and Operation, KPMG in Russia and the CIS
Maxim Protasov — Head, Russian Quality System
Oleg Safonov — Head, Russian Federal Agency for Tourism
Anna Tsivileva — Chairman of the Managment Board, Kolmar Sales and Logistics (KSL AG)

06.09.2017
15:15—16:45

Building A, level 8, Conference hall 11

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Pandemic Preparedness as a Condition of Sustainable Economic Growth in the Asia-Pacific Region

The Asia-Pacific region is among the most vulnerable to the threat of pandemic. The spread of infection has an impact on many sectors, including trade, investment, tourism, medicine, and scientific and technological cooperation. Losses caused by new (highly pathogenic influenza, the Zika virus, coronavirus) and well-known (HIV/AIDS, dengue fever, malaria) infections in a region can amount to billions of dollars, but they can be avoided. To make this possible, rapidly growing economic and social links in the region should be accompanied by investment in strengthening epidemic warning and reaction systems, and in developing intergovernmental cooperation on a regional level. This will reduce the negative effects of pandemics on the economy and the progress of integration processes, and increase investment attractiveness. The key to increasing preparedness and the ability to react to a pandemic in the Asia-Pacific region lies in political commitment to cooperation in this area, developing collaboration between healthcare services, and scientific and technological cooperation in research and development to identify new means of diagnosing and preventing infection. Is the Asia-Pacific region prepared for the next pandemic? What weak points are there in existing systems for controlling epidemics in the region? Would it be possible to create a single international epidemic warning and reaction system in the region? What could Russia and other states in the region contribute to the creation of such a system? What are the priorities for scientific and technological cooperation between countries in the region in order to increase readiness to deal with the threat of infection? What incentives exist to encourage private sector investment in healthcare, scientific and technological cooperation to counter pandemics in the Asia-Pacific region?

Moderator:
Anna Popova — Head, Federal Service for Surveillance on Consumer Rights Protection and Human Wellbeing

Panellists:
Oleg Deripaska — President, Member of the Board of Directors, RUSAL; Chairman of the Supervisory Board, Basic Element
Qudsia Huda — Team Leader, Operational Readiness Team, Country Health Emergency Preparedness and IHR(CPI), World Health Organization (WHO)
Luiz Loures — Deputy Executive Director, Programme, UNAIDS
Svetlana Lukash — Deputy Head of the Presidential Experts Directorate, Sherpa G20 Russian Federation
Victoria Panova — Vice-Rector for International Relations, Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU)
Alena Peryshkina — Director, AIDS Infoshare Foundation
Dang Quang Tan — Deputy Director, General Department of Preventive Medicine, Ministry of Health of Vietnam
Zhao Yang — Deputy Director General, Department of Health and Quarantine Supervision, General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine of the People's Republic of China (AQSIQ)

06.09.2017
15:15—16:45

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 6

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

The Russia–China–Japan–US Quadrangle: Are There Opportunities for Cooperation?

Valdai Club Session

A session devoted to discussing new opportunities for multilateral cooperation in Asia. The context for such a discussion is provided by the continuation of ‘Russia’s turn pivot to the East’, changes in USA regional and global policy, the strengthening of the multifaceted partnership between Russia and China, and the spirit of cooperation pervading Russian-Japanese relations. Although contradictions and disagreements on important issues exist between the countries of the Asian region, Asia should not be allowed to become a region divided by zones of influence and competition between groupings of states. The refusal of the USA to participate in projects regarded by the previous administration as a means of containing China and, in part, Russia, could open up new opportunities for multilateral cooperation. Russia needs to further strengthen its position in Asia through collaboration with all of the important players in the region, and to engage them in projects to develop the Russian Far East and deepen its integration into regional and global markets. It is the relationships that exist within the Russia-China-USA-Japan quadrangle that could eventually become a basis for cooperation and coordination of interests which is beneficial to all. A practical agenda for such cooperation must be formed now, through substantive discussion of its participants’ approaches to the political and economic development of Asia and the world as a whole.

Moderator:
Edward Luttwak — Senior Associate, Center for International and Strategic Studies (CSIS)

Panellists:
Edmund Gerald Brown — Governor of the State of California
Andrei Bystritsky — Chairman of the Board, Foundation for Development and Support of the Valdai Discussion Club
Tadashi Maeda — Chief Executive Officer, Executive Managing Director, Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC)
Igor Morgulov — Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation
Stanislav Voskresensky — Deputy Minister of Economic Development of the Russian Federation

06.09.2017
15:15—16:45

Building D, level 5, Conference hall 15

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

International space projects in the Asia-Pacific region

Today, the development of space-related activities and rapid progress in the field of applied space systems and research have created a solid foundation for intensifying international cooperation in this area. These trends are emerging most clearly in the Asia-Pacific region. What kinds of areas of space-related activity are of particular interest for cooperation in the Asia-Pacific region? How may regional international organizations assist in identifying and advancing large-scale, multilateral space projects?

Moderator:
Evelina Zakamskaya — Anchor, Russia 24

Panellists:
Mamoru Endou — Senior Vice President, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)
Yuriy Kulchin — Director, Institute of Automation and Control Processes Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences
Yuriy Makarov — Director, Joint Department for Strategic Planning and State Space Programs, State Space Corporation ROSCOSMOS
Andrey Tyulin — General Director, Russian Space Systems
Kimia Yui — Astronaut, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)
Tian Yulong — Secretary General, China National Space Administration (CNSA)

06.09.2017
17:15—18:45

Building D, level 5, Conference hall 12

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

The Fight Against Social Inequality and Polarization in Countries of the Asia-Pacific Region

The risks arising from growing social inequality have been discussed by international experts for a number of years. On the basis of UN data for 2017, it is clear that social inequality is far more pronounced than anyone had assumed: 3.6 billion people on the planet lack the basic essentials and many cannot afford to go to school or to visit the doctor. Reducing the scale of social inequality in the Asia-Pacific region will be of crucial importance in achieving the objective of reducing social inequality at the international level. What policies for reducing social inequality are being pursued by the countries of the Asia-Pacific region in order to protect disadvantaged groups? What programmes and ideas for reducing social polarization have already been implemented? Will these prove effective in the long-term? If not, what urgent steps must be taken?

Moderator:
Natalia Pochinok — Rector, Russian State Social University

Panellists:
Valery Fedorov — Director General, Russian Public Opinion Research Center (VCIOM)
Oleg Fomichev — State Secretary, Deputy Minister of Economic Development of the Russian Federation
Olga Golodets — Deputy Prime Minister of the Russian Federation
Pavel Kadochnikov — President, Center for Strategic Research Foundation
Elena Myakotnikova — Corporate Director, Agency for Strategic Initiatives
Maxim Topilin — Minister of Labour and Social Protection of the Russian Federation

Front row participants:
Olga Epifanova — Deputy Chair, The State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation
Tatiana Maleva — Director, Institute for Social Analysis and Forecasting, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration
Evgeniy Podlesny — Head, Department of Social Policy of the Chukotka Autonomous Region
Natalya Zubarevich — Regional Program Director, Independent Institute for Social Policy (IISP); Senior Research Fellow, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration

06.09.2017
17:30—19:00

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 8

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Logistics in Russia and Asia-Pacific Interconnect under China’s Belt and Road Initiative

In partnership with FESCO

China is moving its Belt and Road initiative from a framework discussion phase to tangible projects, establishing the preconditions for the development of routes across Russia with the active involvement of major players in the Russian transport industry. Sino-Russian cooperation in this area is supported by the two countries’ heads of state, who signed a joint declaration on cooperation to connect the Eurasian Economic Union and the Silk Road Economic Belt. Freight owners in Asia-Pacific countries currently spend up to USD 1 billion per year on transporting freight by sea (bypassing Russia). If Russian and Chinese transport companies begin offering cheaper and more convenient services, up to 30% of freight could be transported by land across China and Russia rather than by sea. How should Russia make the most of the opportunities presented by China’s Belt and Road initiative? What action is already being taken by market players to develop the country’s transit potential, such as overland routes along the Trans-Siberian Railway? What limiting factors are currently preventing freight traffic in Asia-Pacific countries, like China, from being connected to Russian transit routes? What steps need to be taken by the Chinese and Russian governments in the near future to create conditions that will foster increased cooperation in this area?

Moderator:
Natalia Knyazhevich — Anchor, RBC Сhannel

Panellists:
Petr Baskakov — Chief Executive Officer, TransContainer
Alexandrs Isurins — Chairman of the Executive Board, President, Far Eastern Shipping Company (FESCO)
Sergey Konovalenko — Head of Directorate, Federal Customs Service
Guangsheng Li — Deputy General Manager, Zhengzhou International Hub Development and Construction Co Ltd
Jinyou Wang — Group Managing Director, SWIFT Transportation Group

06.09.2017
17:30—19:00

Building B, level 7, Conference hall 5

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Connecting Europe and Asia. International Transport Corridors in the Russian Far East

An important project for realizing the transit potential of the Russian Far East is the development of the international transport corridors ‘Primorye 1’ and ‘Primorye 2’, linking the north-eastern provinces of China with ports in the south of Primorsky Territory. The potential total cargo base of these is estimated at around 45 million tonnes annually. It is the objective of both countries’ governments to make the transit of cargo through these corridors ‘seamless’ and competitive. Between 2016 and 2017, Russia for its part has adopted a full range of practical solutions for creating attractive conditions for cargo transit via international transport corridors: a 24-hour regime has been introduced for checkpoint operation together with simplified and fast-tracked customs control procedures designated for seaports rather than the land border. What action is the Chinese side taking to develop these corridors? When and under what conditions will the construction of new infrastructure for the international transport corridors begin? How will support for investors from both countries be realized as investment projects for the development of transport corridors are implemented? What measures must be taken to create a ‘seamless’ regime, reduce transport costs for shippers, and lower expenses and customs clearance times for transit cargo?

Moderator:
Elena Kuznetsova — Partner, McKinsey & Company

Panellists:
Kim Hyun Suk — President of the Visual Display Business, Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd.
Irina Olkhovskaya — First Deputy General Director - Commercial Director, "Port Management Company" - management company of "Vostochny Port"
Nikolai Podguzov — General Director, Russian Post
Wang Xingzhu — Mayor, Suifenhe Municipal People's Government
Jin Yuhui — Vice-Governor of Jilin Province, People's Republic of China
Jia Yumei — Vice-Governor of Heilongjiang Province, People's Republic of China
Xian Zhu — Vice President, Chief Operations Officer, New Development Bank

Front row participants:
Movses Barsegyan — President, International Express LLC
Valery Dubrovsky — Director of the Investment Department, Far East Investment and Export Agency
Alexander Osipov — First Deputy Minister for the Development of the Russian Far East
Aleksey Vasilchenko — Managing Director "Aviation", Basic Element
Borisbiy Zhangurazov — Senior Director for Foreign Projects, Summa Group

06.09.2017
18:00—19:30

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 6

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Russia’s Pivot to the East: Outcomes and New Goals

TV Debates of Russia 24 and the Valdai Discussion Club

‘Russia’s Turn to the East’ has taken place. This is true both in an international respect – both political and economic – and, more importantly, internally, with measures for the development of Siberia and the Russian Far East, with the creation of the conditions for integrating them into the Asian and European markets. At the same time, Russia is diversifying its links with Asia – the number of highly important partners with which it is strengthening its relations already includes a large group of countries – China, Japan, South Korea, Singapore, and Vietnam. In a changing global environment, it is vital for Russia to build cooperation with its Asian partners. It is equally important that leading European, and perhaps also American players, should be ‘hitched’ to cooperative relationships between Russia, Asia, and Eurasia, both on a state and on a corporate level. A programme of action is needed which will strengthen Russia’s position in Asia and create a critical mass of collaboration and cooperation. This must be achieved first and foremost in economic terms, in order to make the country a fully-fledged Atlantic-Pacific power of the future. It is likewise important now to confirm Russia’s negotiating position – what do we want from our partners? It is vital that we address our partners in Asia with a clear and precise message, indicating what areas and topics in our relations with them are optimal for Russia from the point of view of the challenges posed by her internal development.

Moderator:
Stanislav Natanzon — Anchor, Russia 24 TV Channel

Panellists:
Timofei Bordachev — Programme Director, The Valdai Discussion Club
Egor Borisov — Head of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)
Andrei Bystritsky — Chairman of the Board, Foundation for Development and Support of the Valdai Discussion Club
Sergey Karaganov — Dean, School of International Economics and Foreign Affairs, National Research University Higher School of Economics; Honorary Chairman of the Presidium, Council on Foreign and Defence Policy
Jae-Young Lee — Vice President, Russian and CIS Economy, Korea-CIS Economic Cooperation, Korea Institute for International Economic Policy (KIEP)
Edward Luttwak — Senior Associate, Center for International and Strategic Studies (CSIS)

07.09.2017
09:00—10:30

Building A, level 5, Conference hall 10

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Healthcare Investment in the Asia-Pacific Region: The Economic and Social Impact

Accessible healthcare services for all sectors of the population is the most important principle of inclusive economic growth in the countries of the Asia-Pacific region, together with income equality, accessible education, and environmental protection. In investing in healthcare, business is interested in returns, and the government in extending the life expectancy of its citizens, as well as their working lives, and accelerating the pace of economic growth. How is a balance between the interests of the private sector and the state ensured in healthcare in Asia-Pacific region countries? What are the key trends in healthcare development in the Asia-Pacific region? How can the Russian Far East make use of the concrete advantages of Asia-Pacific healthcare systems for its own development?

Moderator:
Guzel Ulumbekova — President of the Board, Association of Medical Societies for Quality of Medical Care and Medical Education; Head, Higher School of Healthcare Organization and Management

Panellists:
Elena Gorchakova — Adviser to the Minister for the Development of the Russian Far East
Valery Karpenko — Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Kamchatka Territory
Luiz Loures — Deputy Executive Director, Programme, UNAIDS
Makoto Mihara — General Manager, Healthcare Division, JGC Corporation
Pavel Serebryakov — Vice Governor of Primorsky Territory for Healthcare, Social Affairs, Physical Culture and Sport
Myongsei Sohn — Professor, Department of Health Law and Ethics, Yonsei University

Front row participants:
Zalim Balkizov — Official Representative, Association for Medical Education in Europe (AMEE)
Kirill Kaem — Vice-President, Executive Director of ВIO Cluster, Skolkovo Foundation
Yury Khotimchenko — Vice-Rector for Medical Affairs; Director, School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU)
Alexei Nekhzer — Coordinator, "Japanese Medicine" programme; Association of Oncology Organizations of the Far East and Siberia
Ekaterina Timofeeva — Partner, Managing Director, The Boston Consulting Group
Kenji Toba — President, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Japan
Evgeny Yakovlev — Professor of Economics, New Economic School (NES)

07.09.2017
09:00—10:30

Building D, level 5, Conference hall 15

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

The Atom as a Carbon-Free Basis for the Energy Sector of the Future in the Asia Pacific Region

The Asian-Pacific Region is one of the largest world centres of international trade, financial resources and modern production. It is of principal importance to create energy systems on the basis of carbon-free sources in the countries of the region to ensure high growth and intensive industrial high-technological development along with compliance with the commitments in the area of struggle against the climate change. In this respect, the development of nuclear power is of special significance. Nuclear already takes about 10 % in the total energy mix of the region, the region itself is the focal point for growth of nuclear capacities. What challenges face countries in the region in developing their energy programmes? What are the high-demand solutions and what effect are new and developing nuclear generation capabilities having on the region?

Moderator:
Peter Bird — Senior Adviser, Rothschild Global Advisory

Panellists:
Yoichi Ito — Deputy Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan (MEXT)
Roman Kopin — Governor and Chairman of the Government of Chukotka Autonomous Area
Alexey Likhachev — Chief Executive Officer, ROSATOM State Atomic Energy Corporation
Donato Marcos — Undersecretary of the Department of Energy of the Republic of the Philippines

07.09.2017
11:30—13:00

Building A, level 3, Conference hall 16

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Competitive Customs Regulation: Best Practices in the Asia-Pacific Region

Russia has taken unprecedented steps in recent years to implement specialized regulations targeted at the development of the Russian Far East. Many of the practices being applied in state regulation are unique for Russia. A range of measures for simplifying customs procedures are presently being implemented in the advanced special economic zones and in the Free Port of Vladivostok, but in the face of strong competition for investors from the Asia-Pacific region these may prove insufficient. What practical results have been achieved thanks to the introduction of special customs regulations in the advanced special social and economic zones and in the Free Port of Vladivostok? Do the new customs instruments reflect the successful practices of Asia-Pacific region countries? What promising new technologies make it possible to increase the efficiency of customs operations and reduce administrative burden on foreign trade operators? What next steps should be taken to improve customs regulation mechanisms?

Moderator:
Mikhail Orlov — Partner, Head of Tax and Legal, KPMG Russia

Panellists:
Vladimir Bulavin — Head, Federal Customs Service
Hiroshi Kishimoto — Deputy Director General of the Customs and Tariff Bureau, Ministry of Finance of Japan
Nikolai Podguzov — General Director, Russian Post
Aleksey Shilo — Director of Commerce Activities, General Director of the Center of Corporate Transportation Services, Russian Railways
Vadim Shvetsov — General Director, Member of the Board of Directors, SOLLERS

Front row participants:
Elena Gubina — General Director, SeaLife
Denis Kurochkin — General Director, Beringpromugol
Yevgeny Sachkov — General Director, Eurasian Diamond Centre
Tamara Safonova — General Director, Ussuriyskiy Industrial Park
Vitaly Verkeenko — General Director, Sumotori Machinery Group
Pavel Volkov — State Secretary, Deputy Minister for the Development of the Russian Far East

07.09.2017
11:30—13:00

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 6

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

New Technologies in the Asia-Pacific Financial Sector. How Blockchain is Transforming Reality

Perhaps nowhere more than in the financial sector do trust and the availability of intermediary chains play such a crucial role. Blockchain technology is potentially able to replace both, and to increase drastically the productivity in the sector. Recent direct investment in this area has amounted to nearly USD 2 billion, with more than 500 companies emerging. On the other hand, no breakthroughs have been seen yet, except for virtual currency ones. The key to the success of blockchain technology is the definition and harmonization of common standards as a key prerequisite. As no such common standards have been found and instated yet, there is a window of opportunity for the Asia-Pacific region. Once the standard is defined, everybody will follow the leader. By choosing a relevant direction for itself and combining and coordinating its efforts, the region could set a sufficient impetus for establishing a worldwide standard and achieving further dissemination and adoption of blockchain technology. How does blockchain technology affect the financial sector, and what realistic potential does it offer? What role can Russia and its Far East play in the development of blockchain technology? What are the success factors, and what is the model for international interaction and management?

Moderator:
Max Hauser — Partner, Managing Director, The Boston Consulting Group

Panellists:
Alexander Borodich — Founder, Universa Blockchain Platform
Igor Bulantsev — Senior Vice-President, Sberbank; Head, Sberbank CIB
Antonio Fallico — President, Conoscere Eurasia Association; Chairman, Board of Directors, Banca Intesa
Sergey Gorkov — Chairman, Bank for Development and Foreign Economic Affairs (Vnesheconombank)
Boris Titov — Presidential Commissioner of the Russian Federation for the Protection of Entrepreneurs’ Rights

Front row participants:
Oleg Shibanov — Professor of Economics, Deputy First Vice-Rector, New Economic School (NES)
Demetrios Zamboglou — Chief Business Development Officer, Lykke Corp.

07.09.2017
11:30—13:00

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 7

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Increasing Academic Mobility in the Asia-Pacific Region

The intensification in transnational flows of information, capital, and technology has created a situation in which labour markets and educational services have expanded beyond their own national borders. In the last decades, practically all developed countries have implemented numerous reforms to their education systems, including in their programmes such crucial components as internationalization, and investing enormous financial resources into them. In this context, it is in the interests of practically all Asia-Pacific region countries to invest in a more forward-looking strategy to development human resource potential in the region. What strategies for internationalization at institutions of higher learning in the Asia-Pacific region appear the most forward-looking? Is it possible to identify universal mechanisms for developing internationalization in higher education which can be applied just as effectively to the region as a whole? What are the most acute obstacles to developing academic mobility? The challenges and prospects of establishing a single educational space in the region. Experience from mutual recognition of educational courses and diplomas.

Moderator:
Victoria Panova — Vice-Rector for International Relations, Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU)

Panellists:
Mikhail Fedoruk — Rector, Novosibirsk State University
Christopher Tremewan — Secretary General, Association of Pacific Rim Universities
Kiyoshi Yamada — Chancellor, Tokai University
Wang Yan — Director, Department for International Cooperation, National Institute of Education Sciences of China; EDNET (Education Network) Coordinator, Human Resources Development Working Group (HRDWG), Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC)
Kim Yong-Hak — President, Yonsei University
Pavel Zenkovich — State Secretary - Deputy Minister of Science and Education of the Russian Federation

07.09.2017
11:30—13:00

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 9

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Smart Energy: Balancing Demand with Capacity. New Projects

In partnership with En+ Group

The major revolutionary breakthroughs of the last 300 years have been possible thanks to the discovery of new kinds of fuel. Starting with hydropower during the industrial revolution, it was then the turn of hydrocarbon-based fuels: coal, oil, and gas – and now the world awaits the full arrival of renewable energy sources. But today the development of IT and technology is creating colossal opportunities for optimizing how we use energy and increasing energy efficiency – and it’s entirely possible that the results could amount to a new energy revolution. What is the present demand from the world economy for new energy technologies? What impact will big data, machine learning and other ‘smart’ technologies have on this highly traditional sector of the economy? Could the Russian Far East become a ‘smart’ energy hub for the Asia-Pacific region? What would be needed in order to achieve this, and what is the realistic potential of Russia’s Far East taking into consideration its numerous competitive neighbours who are already engaging actively with the smart energy era?

Moderator:
Pavel Sorokin — Head, Analytical Center of the Energy Sector, Russian Energy Center of the Ministry of Energy of the Russian Federation

Panellists:
Anatoliy Chubais — Chairman of the Executive Board, RUSNANO Corporation
Alexander Dyukov — Chairman of the Management Board, Chief Executive Officer, PJSC Gazprom Neft
Kazuo Furukawa — Chairman, New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO)
Dmitriy Konov — Chairman of the Management Board, SIBUR Holding
Alexander Novak — Minister of Energy of the Russian Federation
Vyacheslav Solomin — Chief Executive Officer, EUROSIBENERGO PLC.

Front row participants:
Mikhail Kolesnikov — Vice President, All-Russian Non-Governmental Organization of Small and Medium-Sized Business OPORA RUSSIA
Evgeniy Olkhovich — Deputy General Director for Strategic Development, Rosseti
Grigory Vygon — Managing Director, VYGON Consulting

07.09.2017
11:30—13:00

Building B, level 7, Conference hall 4

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Cybercrime: The Key Threat to the Digital Economy

Sberbank Workshop

Due to explosive growth of technologies, the most innovative actors in the international community have been transitioning to the digital economy, Russia being one of the leading participants in this “race”. The total “digitalization” and other disruptive processes force Asia-Pacific companies to change their conventional practices and approaches to doing business, which means overhauling management models. The increasing take-up of AI, Big Data, Blockchain in traditional sectors of economy is enabling people on the planet to break-through to much higher living standards. The unfortunate truth is that the criminal world adapts to technological changes very quickly, and we are all becoming unwilling witnesses of international businesses falling victims to cyberattacks. Such attacks are becoming increasingly targeted, automated, simple to manage and wide-spread, whereas hacker communities are becoming ever higher organized and international. Not only conventional businesses are threatened. For example, attacks on electronic exchanges and wallet management systems of several cryptocurrencies based on blockchain inflicted damage equivalent to USD 100 million last year. Sberbank, as the largest financial institution in Russia, CIS and Eastern Europe, encounters cyberattacks every day and is keenly aware that only united efforts of state institutions, financial and corporate sectors of the world economy in fighting cyberthreats can pave a secure way for a transition to our digital future. How can Far East companies in Russia get securely integrated into the ecosystem of a digital business? How can Asia-Pacific nations interact effectively in fighting cybercrime?

Moderator:
Stanislav Kuznetsov — Deputy Chairman of the Executive Board, Sberbank

07.09.2017
17:00—18:30

Building B, level 6, Conference hall 8

We Are Neighbours: Earning through Cooperation

Fostering Cooperation from Lisbon to Vladivostok: Vladivostok!

The key tasks the ‘From Lisbon to Vladivostok’ project is designed to address are promoting the development of international cooperation and joint activities from Lisbon to Vladivostok, and establishing and coordinating further bilateral and multilateral relations between EAEU member countries and EU partners. The Eurasian Economic Union (EAEU) is one of the centres around which the Greater Eurasian partnership is being formed. The formation of a Greater Eurasia is a necessary but insufficient prerequisite for the growth of trade on the Eurasian continent, and one of the future pillars of the world economy. Are the interested parties ready to start implementing this megaproject now? What steps can be taken to start forming a Greater Eurasia now, despite political difficulties? How do we ensure Russia’s involvement in the Silk Road Economic Belt project? Which economic cooperation model will most benefit trade between the EU and the EAEU? What infrastructure projects need to be implemented in the Russian Far East to fully connect the region to European integration processes?

Moderator:
Alexander Knobel — Director, Institute of World Economics and Finance, Russian Foreign Trade Academy, Ministry of Economic Development of the Russian Federation

Panellists:
Rashid Alimov — Secretary General, Shanghai Cooperation Organisation
Alexander Gareev — Managing Director, Eurasian Development Bank (EDB)
Kim Jongkyung — Regional Director General for CIS, Korea Trade and Investment Promotion Agency (KOTRA)
Sergey Karaganov — Dean, School of International Economics and Foreign Affairs, National Research University Higher School of Economics; Honorary Chairman of the Presidium, Council on Foreign and Defence Policy
Matthias Schepp — Chairman, Russian-German Chamber of Commerce; B20 Germany representative
Sergey Utkin — Head of Foreign Policy and Security Direction, Strategic Research Center Foundation

Front row participants:
Vladimir Klimanov — Director, Institute for Public Finance Reform (IPFR); Head of the Chair for State Economic Regulation, RANEPA School of Public Policy
Nikolay Pegin — General Director, Development Corporation of Kamchatka
Petr Shelakhaev — Deputy General Director, Far East and Baikal Region Development Fund